Translations/Questions

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hashi
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Re: Translations/Questions

Postby hashi » 2016-02-29, 20:38

Why does ci have to mean so many things xD Based on my knowledge so far, it can mean:

- 'there' (as in 'there are two dogs' > ci sono due cani, and of course c'è)
- 'us' (as in 'he doesn't see us' > lui non ci vede)
- 'ourselves' (as in 'we see ourselves here' > ci vediamo qui)

Am I missing any others?

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Re: Translations/Questions

Postby zchance » 2016-03-09, 15:33

I am from Utah in the USA and I am trying to find a phrase that roughly translates as "This is the place". Locally it is a famous quote. I found a sicialian slang term, "Keste" which I assume is from "que este" which I believe means "This is it" Google's translate page gave me, "questo è il posto" which is longer than I had hoped and difficult for Americans to spell intuitively. Is there something else shorter/simpler that may work?

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Re: Translations/Questions

Postby IpseDixit » 2016-03-09, 17:32

zchance wrote:I am from Utah in the USA and I am trying to find a phrase that roughly translates as "This is the place". Locally it is a famous quote. I found a sicialian slang term, "Keste" which I assume is from "que este" which I believe means "This is it" Google's translate page gave me, "questo è il posto" which is longer than I had hoped and difficult for Americans to spell intuitively. Is there something else shorter/simpler that may work?



"Questo è il posto" is correct. There is no shorter/simpler way to translate it unless you want to slightly alter the meaning, for example you could say "è il posto" but technically it means "it is the place". You can also use the word "luogo" as an alternative to "posto".

Oh and it's "è" with the grave accent. Make sure to write it otherwise if you write "questo e il posto" what you're saying is "this and the place".

As for Sicilian slang I can't help you.

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Re: Translations/Questions

Postby IpseDixit » 2016-03-10, 9:52

hashi wrote:Why does ci have to mean so many things xD Based on my knowledge so far, it can mean:

- 'there' (as in 'there are two dogs' > ci sono due cani, and of course c'è)
- 'us' (as in 'he doesn't see us' > lui non ci vede)
- 'ourselves' (as in 'we see ourselves here' > ci vediamo qui)

Am I missing any others?


"Ci" can also replace "a+pronoun". E.g:

A: Tu credi alle fate?
B: No, non ci credo.

---

A: Hai pensato a cosa vuoi fare dopo l'università?
B: Sì, ci ho pensato.

hashi wrote:(as in 'we see ourselves here' > ci vediamo qui)


Although ci vediamo qui literally means that, it's usually used to mean "we're going to meet up here"

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Re: Translations/Questions

Postby Massimiliano B » 2016-04-12, 22:45

hashi wrote:Why does ci have to mean so many things xD Based on my knowledge so far, it can mean:

- 'there' (as in 'there are two dogs' > ci sono due cani, and of course c'è)
- 'us' (as in 'he doesn't see us' > lui non ci vede)
- 'ourselves' (as in 'we see ourselves here' > ci vediamo qui)

Am I missing any others?


"Ci" also means "by/with something". For example:

"A cosa ti serve la bicicletta?" - "Ci vado a scuola" ("What do you do with your bicicle?" - "I go to school by it ("by it" = ci)".


"Cosa fai con questo aggeggio?" - "Ci apro le bottiglie" ("what do you do with this thing?" - "I open bottles by means of it" (by means of it = ci).

These two usages, however, are colloquial, but widely used.
Dette er nemlig Formelen, som beskriver Selvets Tilstand, naar Fortvivlelsen ganske er udryddet: i at forholde sig til sig selv, og i at ville være sig selv grunder Selvet gjennemsigtigt i den Magt, som satte det. (This is namely the formula, that describes the condition of the self, when despair is completely eradicated: by relating itself to itself, and by willing to be itself, the self is grounded transparently in the power which constituted it) (Søren Kierkegaard, The sickness unto death)

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Re: Translations/Questions

Postby hashi » 2016-04-12, 23:02

Thanks erryone for the clarification. I will take note of these and try to remember haha.

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Re: Translations/Questions

Postby OldBoring » 2016-04-13, 2:11

Totti si ferma al semaforo rosso. Un mendicante ceceno si avvicina e gli dice: “Tu dare me un euro.”.
Totti: “E perché?”.
“Perché io ceceno.”.
“Ma come ce ceni? Io co' un euro nun ce pijo manco er caffè.”.

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Re: Translations/Questions

Postby Massimiliano B » 2016-04-13, 19:47

OldBoring wrote:Totti si ferma al semaforo rosso. Un mendicante ceceno si avvicina e gli dice: “Tu dare me un euro.”.
Totti: “E perché?”.
“Perché io ceceno.”.
“Ma come ce ceni? Io co' un euro nun ce pijo manco er caffè.”.


Ah ah ah! La sapevo!

Qui il "ci" ("ce" in romanesco) significa appunto "con un euro".
Dette er nemlig Formelen, som beskriver Selvets Tilstand, naar Fortvivlelsen ganske er udryddet: i at forholde sig til sig selv, og i at ville være sig selv grunder Selvet gjennemsigtigt i den Magt, som satte det. (This is namely the formula, that describes the condition of the self, when despair is completely eradicated: by relating itself to itself, and by willing to be itself, the self is grounded transparently in the power which constituted it) (Søren Kierkegaard, The sickness unto death)

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Re: Translations/Questions

Postby hashi » 2016-08-09, 8:03

Hi, quick question. Was listening to a song and reading along the lyrics, and came across this line: Vorrei toccarti e respirarti. I have no idea what respirarti is meant to mean. Can anyone elaborate? I figured it'd be something like "breathe on you", but if so, that's really weird xD

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Re: Translations/Questions

Postby IpseDixit » 2016-08-09, 9:53

hashi wrote:Hi, quick question. Was listening to a song and reading along the lyrics, and came across this line: Vorrei toccarti e respirarti. I have no idea what respirarti is meant to mean. Can anyone elaborate? I figured it'd be something like "breathe on you", but if so, that's really weird xD


Actually it's even weirder, respirarti means "breathe you", it's definitely poetic stuff that is not supposed to have any real logical meaning, I guess you can kinda interpret it as you like.

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Re: Translations/Questions

Postby hashi » 2016-08-10, 8:54

Hahaha that is definitely odd. Thanks for the response :)

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Re: Translations/Questions

Postby Bernard » 2016-08-29, 11:20

Ciao a tutti!
Chi sa indicarmi l’etimologia del nome del commune di Amatrice? Suppongo che la parola non derivi dal latino ‚amatrix‘, cioè l’amante f.

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Re: Translations/Questions

Postby OldBoring » 2016-08-30, 11:58

Bernard wrote:Ciao a tutti!
Chi sa indicarmi l’etimologia del nome del commune di Amatrice? Suppongo che la parola non derivi dal latino ‚amatrix‘, cioè l’amante f.

Probabilmente da "matrice"; ma originariamente siccome si anteponeva l'articolo, la matrice è stata rianalizzata come l'amatrice, da cui "Amatrice" in italiano, e L'Amatrici in sabino.

Almeno secondo questa pagina: http://www.comuni-italiani.it/057/002/
Etimologia (origine del nome)
Secondo alcuni il nome deriva dalla presenza di una chiesa "matrice" in zona. Molto più probabilmente si riferisce al latino matrix, icis, ossia "canale".


A Roma molti sostengono che "spaghetti/bucatini alla matriciana" sia la grafia originale, e perciò quella preferita dalle trattorie tradizionali o dagli amanti del dialetto.

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Re: Translations/Questions

Postby Bernard » 2016-09-07, 7:54

Ciao, OldBoring!
Ti ringrazio per le tue informazioni utilissime. - L'importante è che Amatrice ha da essere ricostruita.


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