What are they saying here?

Moderator: hashi

User avatar
ainurakne
Posts: 566
Joined: 2012-02-16, 22:09
Gender: male
Country: EE Estonia (Eesti)

Re: What are they saying here?

Postby ainurakne » 2017-02-14, 7:40

More like midnight than middle of the night. Just happened to check my e-mail before calling it a night.

Linguaphile wrote:4. Sel võistlusel kindlad võitjad polnudki > In this competition there isn't a sure winner (but my computer tells me "Sel võistlusel kindlad võitjad polnudki" isn't what they are saying; what do you hear?)
Sel võistlusel kindlat võitjat polnudki. -- partitive singular instead of nominative plural. I think I have seen that before in this thread, that you may mix up the two cases if the difference is just t vs. d.

Linguaphile wrote:5. Rongkäik liikus lippude lehvides väljakule. > The parade went into the square waving flags.
I guess 'to wave' could be both, transitive and intransitive? In this sentence it's intransitive, so maybe "The parade moved into the square, flags waving."?

7th is Pühkigu oma suu lotovõidust puhtaks. - literally (approximately) 'May (s)he wipe his/her mouth clean from a/the lottery winning.' or '... from winning a/the lottery.' (i'm not sure how to phrase this better).
"suu millestki puhtaks pühkima" means something like 'to get empty-handed' or 'to lose or give up something that was hoped/expected'.

Linguaphile wrote:10. Ta keetis suppi ja küpsetas kooki. > He boiled soup and baked a cake.
Or (S)he was boiling soup and baking cake., because of the partitive.
Eesti keel (et) native, English (en) I can manage, Suomi (fi) trying to learn, Pусский (ru)&Deutsch (de) unfortunately, slowly fading away

Linguaphile
Posts: 334
Joined: 2016-09-17, 5:06
Country: US United States (United States)

Re: What are they saying here?

Postby Linguaphile » 2017-02-14, 14:44

ainurakne wrote:Sel võistlusel kindlat võitjat polnudki. -- partitive singular instead of nominative plural. I think I have seen that before in this thread, that you may mix up the two cases if the difference is just t vs. d.
:roll: Yeah, I do that. :headbang:

ainurakne wrote: 7th is Pühkigu oma suu lotovõidust puhtaks. - literally (approximately) 'May (s)he wipe his/her mouth clean from a/the lottery winning.' or '... from winning a/the lottery.' (i'm not sure how to phrase this better).
"suu millestki puhtaks pühkima" means something like 'to get empty-handed' or 'to lose or give up something that was hoped/expected'.

Wow, I don't think I ever would have gotten that one. Thanks!
English (en) Learning is a treasure that follows its owner everywhere.
Spanish (es) El aprendizaje es un tesoro que sigue a su dueño por todas partes.
Estonian (et) Õpitu on aare, mis saadab oma omanikku kõikjal.
German (de) Lernen ist ein Schatz, der seinem Besitzer überallhin folgt.
French (fr) L'apprentissage est un trésor qui suit son propriétaire partout.
Hmong (hmn) Txoj kev kawm yog cov khoom muaj nqis, uas raws nws tus tswv qhov txhia chaw.
Võro (vro) Op'minõ om aarõq, miä saat uma umanikku egäl puul.

Linguaphile
Posts: 334
Joined: 2016-09-17, 5:06
Country: US United States (United States)

Re: What are they saying here?

Postby Linguaphile » 2017-02-16, 20:44

I'm back with another one!

Hääldusharjutused kesk- ja kõrgtasemele > Peatükk 2. Hääldusharjutusi kõrgtasemele > Harjutus I-IX

1. Toomas toob toobi õlut. "Toomas brings a mug of beer."
2. Tartu meeskoor kohtus Tallinna kooriga. "The Tartu men's choir met with the Tallinn choir."
3. Kooli kokk peab kartuleid koorima. "The school cook has to peal potatoes."
4. Kuidas sa seda häälikut hääldad? "How do you pronounce this phoneme?"
5. Jääme järve äärde laagrisse. "We're staying in a/the camp beside a/the lake."
6. Kardan sääski – sääsed imevad verd. "I'm afraid of mosquitoes - mosquitoes suck blood."
7. Läksin õhtul paari sõbraga baari. "In the evening I went to a/the bar with a couple friends."
8. Selle kaaluga ei saa kalu kaaluda. This is the one which I got wrong. What are they actually saying? The way I hear it, I would translate it as "Fish cannot be weighed with this scale" or "With this scale you cannot weigh fish."
9. Maalikunstnik maalis daami portree. "The painter painted the lady's portrait." / "The painter painted a portrait of a lady."

Also, one more question. In a different exercise they use these same sentences and the task is to identify which word in each sentence has the longest vowel (kuulake lauset ja kirjutage sõna, kus te kuulete kõige pikemat vokaali). For Toomas toob toobi õlut, I understand in principle why the correct answer is toob, but the first syllables of Toomas and toobi both sound 'longer' than toob to me. Do you hear it that way too or is it just my ears? Sometimes my ears get length mixed up with emphasis (maybe that's the issue here)? You can listen to it at the link above - although this exercise is from the previous page, it's the exact same recording on both pages. Any thoughts on this?
English (en) Learning is a treasure that follows its owner everywhere.
Spanish (es) El aprendizaje es un tesoro que sigue a su dueño por todas partes.
Estonian (et) Õpitu on aare, mis saadab oma omanikku kõikjal.
German (de) Lernen ist ein Schatz, der seinem Besitzer überallhin folgt.
French (fr) L'apprentissage est un trésor qui suit son propriétaire partout.
Hmong (hmn) Txoj kev kawm yog cov khoom muaj nqis, uas raws nws tus tswv qhov txhia chaw.
Võro (vro) Op'minõ om aarõq, miä saat uma umanikku egäl puul.

User avatar
Naava
Posts: 238
Joined: 2012-01-17, 20:24
Gender: female
Country: FI Finland (Suomi)

Re: What are they saying here?

Postby Naava » 2017-02-16, 23:11

Linguaphile wrote:8. Selle kaaluga ei saa kalu kaaluda. This is the one which I got wrong. What are they actually saying? The way I hear it, I would translate it as "Fish cannot be weighed with this scale" or "With this scale you cannot weigh fish."

-> ei saa kala

Well, you're not alone - to me that toob sounds definitely shorter than Toomas and toobi. Hmm. :hmm: Actually, the more I listen to it, the more toob sounds like tob!

Also, thanks for showing these exercises! They're great. :mrgreen:
native:  (fi)
speaks more or less fluently:  (en)
can talk about weird topics in:  (sv)
learning process started:  (ru) &  (et)

User avatar
ainurakne
Posts: 566
Joined: 2012-02-16, 22:09
Gender: male
Country: EE Estonia (Eesti)

Re: What are they saying here?

Postby ainurakne » 2017-02-17, 8:05

Yep, it's Selle kaaluga ei saa kala kaaluda. - they are either referring to a single fish or fish as an uncountable mass of matter, as is quite frequently done to food stuff.

Checking out the previous exercise myself, it seems that instead of looking for the longest sounding vowel sound, they are rather looking for the word that is kolmandas vältes (in third degree of quantity?), although, I'm not completely sure either what it is that they are looking for.
I think, there should be some kind rule that a closed syllable at the end of the word is automatically overlong by definition if it contains a long sound, or something like that. In that light, both Toomas and toobi are just long.
But in most contexts (unless it's really emphasized), I would also pronounce toob rather short. More precisely, as short as it is in plurals toome, toote and toovad, since the whole present tense should be in the weak grade of the word according to my logic (compare overlong ma-infinitive tooma which is in strong grade). :hmm:
Eesti keel (et) native, English (en) I can manage, Suomi (fi) trying to learn, Pусский (ru)&Deutsch (de) unfortunately, slowly fading away

Linguaphile
Posts: 334
Joined: 2016-09-17, 5:06
Country: US United States (United States)

Re: What are they saying here?

Postby Linguaphile » 2017-02-17, 19:42

Naava wrote:-> ei saa kala

ainurakne wrote:Yep, it's Selle kaaluga ei saa kala kaaluda. - they are either referring to a single fish or fish as an uncountable mass of matter, as is quite frequently done to food stuff

It's funny how we sometimes "hear" exactly what we expect hear - I was expecting partitive plural and really believed I'd heard kalu yesterday. After reading your responses I went back and listened and now it's so clear that it's kala. Thanks!

Naava wrote:Well, you're not alone - to me that toob sounds definitely shorter than Toomas and toobi. Hmm. :hmm: Actually, the more I listen to it, the more toob sounds like tob!

ainurakne wrote:Checking out the previous exercise myself, it seems that instead of looking for the longest sounding vowel sound, they are rather looking for the word that is kolmandas vältes (in third degree of quantity?), although, I'm not completely sure either what it is that they are looking for.

I'm glad I'm not alone then!

ainurakne wrote:I think, there should be some kind rule that a closed syllable at the end of the word is automatically overlong by definition if it contains a long sound, or something like that. In that light, both Toomas and toobi are just long.
But in most contexts (unless it's really emphasized), I would also pronounce toob rather short. More precisely, as short as it is in plurals toome, toote and toovad, since the whole present tense should be in the weak grade of the word according to my logic (compare overlong ma-infinitive tooma which is in strong grade). :hmm:

Okay, yeah.... but the idea that a word that is "kolmandas vältes/third degree of quantity" can be essentially be pronounced like a "second- or first-degree of quantity" word is messing with my mind. :headbang: :headbang:

Naava wrote:Also, thanks for showing these exercises! They're great. :mrgreen:
Võta heaks! I think I had found them a while ago (before I started posting here) and gave up in frustration.... I came across them again as a result of an earlier discussion on this forum and now that I have you guys to turn to when I get stuck, it's not so bad.
English (en) Learning is a treasure that follows its owner everywhere.
Spanish (es) El aprendizaje es un tesoro que sigue a su dueño por todas partes.
Estonian (et) Õpitu on aare, mis saadab oma omanikku kõikjal.
German (de) Lernen ist ein Schatz, der seinem Besitzer überallhin folgt.
French (fr) L'apprentissage est un trésor qui suit son propriétaire partout.
Hmong (hmn) Txoj kev kawm yog cov khoom muaj nqis, uas raws nws tus tswv qhov txhia chaw.
Võro (vro) Op'minõ om aarõq, miä saat uma umanikku egäl puul.

Linguaphile
Posts: 334
Joined: 2016-09-17, 5:06
Country: US United States (United States)

Re: What are they saying here?

Postby Linguaphile » 2017-02-18, 18:35

Here's the next one!
Hääldusharjutused kesk- ja kõrgtasemele > Peatükk 2. Hääldusharjutusi kõrgtasemele > Harjutus II-I

1. Kersti keedab kartuleid ja paneb ka peedid keema. "Kersti is boiling some potatoes and also putting some beets to boil."
2. Mulle meenus, et homme on eesti keele tund. "It occurred to me that tomorrow is the Estonian language class."
3. Seenemetsast korja ainult söödavaid seeni. (this one is incorrect, so please listen to this one and tell me what you hear) "Pick only the edible mushrooms from the forest." [I know seenemets is a "mushroom forest," but that just doesn't work in English. Try searching for images of "mushroom forest" in English and you'll see what i mean! :mrgreen: ]
4. Sööklas sööme me ainult köögivilju. "In the cafeteria we only eat vegetables."
5. Ööbik laulab öösel. "The nightengale sings at night."
6. Gröönimaal ei saa telgis ööbida. "In Greenland one can't spend the night in a tent."
7. Mõõgaga võõra üle me ei rõõmusta. "We don't delight in taking a sword against a stranger/foreigner." (Surely there is a better way to translate that, but it's not coming to mind.)
8. Sellele sõralisele meeldib põõsas põõnata. "This hoofed animal likes to sleep in the bush/bushes."
9. Kass võttis suure sõõmu rõõska koort. "The cat took a large gulp of sweet cream."
English (en) Learning is a treasure that follows its owner everywhere.
Spanish (es) El aprendizaje es un tesoro que sigue a su dueño por todas partes.
Estonian (et) Õpitu on aare, mis saadab oma omanikku kõikjal.
German (de) Lernen ist ein Schatz, der seinem Besitzer überallhin folgt.
French (fr) L'apprentissage est un trésor qui suit son propriétaire partout.
Hmong (hmn) Txoj kev kawm yog cov khoom muaj nqis, uas raws nws tus tswv qhov txhia chaw.
Võro (vro) Op'minõ om aarõq, miä saat uma umanikku egäl puul.

Prantsis
Posts: 67
Joined: 2016-11-02, 15:32
Gender: male
Country: FR France (France)

Re: What are they saying here?

Postby Prantsis » 2017-02-18, 19:02

Linguaphile wrote:Seenemetsast korja ainult söödavaid seeni!

:mrgreen:

Linguaphile
Posts: 334
Joined: 2016-09-17, 5:06
Country: US United States (United States)

Re: What are they saying here?

Postby Linguaphile » 2017-02-18, 19:29

Prantsis wrote:
Linguaphile wrote:Seenemetsast korja ainult söödavaid seeni!

:mrgreen:

Oh good grief... it was driving me crazy. Thank you!
:oops:
English (en) Learning is a treasure that follows its owner everywhere.
Spanish (es) El aprendizaje es un tesoro que sigue a su dueño por todas partes.
Estonian (et) Õpitu on aare, mis saadab oma omanikku kõikjal.
German (de) Lernen ist ein Schatz, der seinem Besitzer überallhin folgt.
French (fr) L'apprentissage est un trésor qui suit son propriétaire partout.
Hmong (hmn) Txoj kev kawm yog cov khoom muaj nqis, uas raws nws tus tswv qhov txhia chaw.
Võro (vro) Op'minõ om aarõq, miä saat uma umanikku egäl puul.

User avatar
ainurakne
Posts: 566
Joined: 2012-02-16, 22:09
Gender: male
Country: EE Estonia (Eesti)

Re: What are they saying here?

Postby ainurakne » 2017-02-18, 21:52

Linguaphile wrote:7. Mõõgaga võõra üle me ei rõõmusta. "We don't delight in taking a sword against a stranger/foreigner." (Surely there is a better way to translate that, but it's not coming to mind.)
This one may indeed feel ambiguous, but I really think (and it sounds that way too) that it's a/the stranger with a sword: "We are not very happy about the stranger with a sword." (We are not happy that there is a stranger with a sword here).

In case of your meaning (although it doesn't make much sense, at least to me), I think it would be more likely "Mõõgaga me võõra üle ei rõõmusta." or "Me võõra üle mõõgaga ei rõõmusta." or "Võõra üle me mõõgaga ei rõõmusta." or "Võõra üle ei rõõmusta me mõõgaga.", etc...
Eesti keel (et) native, English (en) I can manage, Suomi (fi) trying to learn, Pусский (ru)&Deutsch (de) unfortunately, slowly fading away

Linguaphile
Posts: 334
Joined: 2016-09-17, 5:06
Country: US United States (United States)

Re: What are they saying here?

Postby Linguaphile » 2017-02-18, 23:23

ainurakne wrote:
Linguaphile wrote:7. Mõõgaga võõra üle me ei rõõmusta. "We don't delight in taking a sword against a stranger/foreigner." (Surely there is a better way to translate that, but it's not coming to mind.)
This one may indeed feel ambiguous, but I really think (and it sounds that way too) that it's a/the stranger with a sword: "We are not very happy about the stranger with a sword." (We are not happy that there is a stranger with a sword here).

In case of your meaning (although it doesn't make much sense, at least to me), I think it would be more likely "Mõõgaga me võõra üle ei rõõmusta." or "Me võõra üle mõõgaga ei rõõmusta." or "Võõra üle me mõõgaga ei rõõmusta." or "Võõra üle ei rõõmusta me mõõgaga.", etc...

Makes sense now! Thanks!
English (en) Learning is a treasure that follows its owner everywhere.
Spanish (es) El aprendizaje es un tesoro que sigue a su dueño por todas partes.
Estonian (et) Õpitu on aare, mis saadab oma omanikku kõikjal.
German (de) Lernen ist ein Schatz, der seinem Besitzer überallhin folgt.
French (fr) L'apprentissage est un trésor qui suit son propriétaire partout.
Hmong (hmn) Txoj kev kawm yog cov khoom muaj nqis, uas raws nws tus tswv qhov txhia chaw.
Võro (vro) Op'minõ om aarõq, miä saat uma umanikku egäl puul.

Linguaphile
Posts: 334
Joined: 2016-09-17, 5:06
Country: US United States (United States)

Re: What are they saying here?

Postby Linguaphile » 2017-02-19, 4:37

Hääldusharjutused kesk- ja kõrgtasemele > Peatükk 2. Hääldusharjutusi kõrgtasemele > Harjutus II-III

1. Kiilidel on läbipaistvad tiivad. "Dragonflies have transparent wings."
2. Tiiu läbis miili kõige kiiremini. "Tiiu ran the mile the fastest."
3. Siidiussid toodavad siidi. "Silkworms produce silk."
4. Kas üürnik maksis üüri ära? "Did the tenant pay off the rent?" (please listen to this one and make any corrections. For some reason there is no box to submit the answer on the website, so I can't check to see if it is correct.)
5. Küüliku hein pandi küüni. "The rabbit's hay [hay for the rabbit] was put in the barn."
6. Haudadel süüdati küünlad. "Candles were lighted at the graves."
7. Kuulad, kuidas tuul undab? "Do you hear how the wind whistles/blows?" (Same as #4, please check this one, since there is no way to submit it to be checked on the site)
8. Tahan neid uusi luuletusi kuulata. "I want to listen to [hear] these new poems."
9. Puudel luusib kuuri taga. "The poodle wanders around behind the shed."
English (en) Learning is a treasure that follows its owner everywhere.
Spanish (es) El aprendizaje es un tesoro que sigue a su dueño por todas partes.
Estonian (et) Õpitu on aare, mis saadab oma omanikku kõikjal.
German (de) Lernen ist ein Schatz, der seinem Besitzer überallhin folgt.
French (fr) L'apprentissage est un trésor qui suit son propriétaire partout.
Hmong (hmn) Txoj kev kawm yog cov khoom muaj nqis, uas raws nws tus tswv qhov txhia chaw.
Võro (vro) Op'minõ om aarõq, miä saat uma umanikku egäl puul.

User avatar
ainurakne
Posts: 566
Joined: 2012-02-16, 22:09
Gender: male
Country: EE Estonia (Eesti)

Re: What are they saying here?

Postby ainurakne » 2017-02-19, 7:05

Linguaphile wrote:2. Tiiu läbis miili kõige kiiremini. "Tiiu ran the mile the fastest."
Because of the verb läbima, it could be actually anything. She could crawl, walk, swim, ride or even fly it through.

Linguaphile wrote:4. Kas üürnik maksis üüri ära? "Did the tenant pay off the rent?" (please listen to this one and make any corrections. For some reason there is no box to submit the answer on the website, so I can't check to see if it is correct.)
Looks correct to me.

I think 7th is Kuuled, kuidas tuul undab? ("kuulad" - you listen; "kuuled" - you hear), although there is a very unnatural pause there.
Eesti keel (et) native, English (en) I can manage, Suomi (fi) trying to learn, Pусский (ru)&Deutsch (de) unfortunately, slowly fading away

User avatar
Naava
Posts: 238
Joined: 2012-01-17, 20:24
Gender: female
Country: FI Finland (Suomi)

Re: What are they saying here?

Postby Naava » 2017-02-19, 9:39

ainurakne wrote:I think 7th is Kuuled, kuidas tuul undab? ("kuulad" - you listen; "kuuled" - you hear), although there is a very unnatural pause there.

I don't know how much my opinion matters here, but I hear it as kuuled too.
native:  (fi)
speaks more or less fluently:  (en)
can talk about weird topics in:  (sv)
learning process started:  (ru) &  (et)

Linguaphile
Posts: 334
Joined: 2016-09-17, 5:06
Country: US United States (United States)

Re: What are they saying here?

Postby Linguaphile » 2017-02-19, 18:46

ainurakne wrote:I think 7th is Kuuled, kuidas tuul undab? ("kuulad" - you listen; "kuuled" - you hear), although there is a very unnatural pause there.

Naava wrote:I don't know how much my opinion matters here, but I hear it as kuuled too.

Of course your opinion matters, Naava, and thank you both! Definitely kuuled.
English (en) Learning is a treasure that follows its owner everywhere.
Spanish (es) El aprendizaje es un tesoro que sigue a su dueño por todas partes.
Estonian (et) Õpitu on aare, mis saadab oma omanikku kõikjal.
German (de) Lernen ist ein Schatz, der seinem Besitzer überallhin folgt.
French (fr) L'apprentissage est un trésor qui suit son propriétaire partout.
Hmong (hmn) Txoj kev kawm yog cov khoom muaj nqis, uas raws nws tus tswv qhov txhia chaw.
Võro (vro) Op'minõ om aarõq, miä saat uma umanikku egäl puul.


Return to “Estonian (Eesti keel)”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest