Romanian Discussion Group

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IvoCarog
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Re: Romanian Discussion Group

Postby IvoCarog » 2012-08-05, 19:08

Thanks for clarifying that for me, much appreciated! :)
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pleomax28
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Re: Romanian Discussion Group

Postby pleomax28 » 2012-10-06, 13:48

who help me learn english i wiil help him learning romanian.

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Re: Romanian Discussion Group

Postby pittmirg » 2012-11-26, 20:53

Wiktionary lists some ‘popular’ Romanian month names:

gerar, făurar, mărțișor, prier, florar, cireșar, cuptor, gustar, răpciune, brumărel, brumar, undrea/îndrea

Are these commonly used?
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Re: Romanian Discussion Group

Postby AdiJapan » 2012-11-28, 15:23

pittmirg wrote:Wiktionary lists some ‘popular’ Romanian month names:

gerar, făurar, mărțișor, prier, florar, cireșar, cuptor, gustar, răpciune, brumărel, brumar, undrea/îndrea

Are these commonly used?

No. The overwhelming majority of speakers don't even understand these names in a passive way, let alone use them actively.

But some of the names do appear in certain contexts. For instance, March is sometimes called luna lui mărțișor, and people understand this, because they know that mărțișor (a small talisman given to women to be worn pinned on their clothes) is a tradition of the month of March. Similarly, luna lui cuptor (literally the month of the oven) is the hottest month of the year, August, and the phrase may appear in literary texts.

In old texts these words occur more frequently. Also, older people, especially in the country, know and use them more often.

Personally I recognize almost all of them as traditional month names, but I can only identify 3 or 4 of them if they are out of context.
[flag]ro[/flag] maternă  [flag]us[/flag] pretty well  [flag]fr[/flag] pas mal  [flag]ja[/flag] 順調

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Re: Romanian Discussion Group

Postby Ethefor » 2013-01-25, 18:56

Hi, everybody. I'm from Poland and I very like Romanian language. I started to interest in Romanian as I listen to Romanian pop/dance music :P Especially I like DJ Project, Activ, Yarabi, Inna, Costi Ioniță and some song by Gulia, Celia, Voltaj, O-Zone.

I learned French, and I like Romance languages. But this what is the best for me in Romanian is Slavic influence. I love slavic languages because of I'm a slavic man, and I like slavic languages, especially Czech, and Slovak. But Romanian is for me even more interesting because it is Romance language but with strong Slavic influence :) In my opinion Slavic words makes Romanian very special and unique :)
So please Romanian people, don't stop using slavic words in your language. Without Slavic words Romanian would be far less special and interesting. I don't negate that Romanian is a Romance language, and I understand that you go into roots, but mixing of languages and loanwords is very interesting. I like my language Polish as a Slavic language, but I also like loanwords in my language :)

Sorry for my very bad english, but I hope that you understand my post :)

And I would also to ask users of Romanian: please use diacritics. I found that in internet very few text in Romanian are with diacritics, and this is make very difficult to pronouncate your language properly. And I also think that your diacritics are very beatiful. The word săptămâni is more neat and nice than saptamani.

Anyway Romanian language and Romania are for me very interesting, and I explain to my friends in Poland, that Romania is a great, modern country with very interesting language and with many interesing places :)

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Re: Romanian Discussion Group

Postby stefanmerzan » 2013-03-23, 19:10

Inna And Alexandra Stan are very popular in Europe and I Think everyone want to go and watch a concert with this music artists :partyhat:

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Re: Romanian Discussion Group

Postby johnnicecool » 2013-03-24, 14:34

I find it very surprising. While America has many artists that consist of Hip-Hop,Pop,Rock, Reggae,Country,Jazz and so much more, Romania seems like they have catched up too. Most of the music I listen to is Hip-Hop,Pop,Rock, Reggae,Country,Jazz and so much more, and they are all from Romania. I do deep searching to find the music I listen to, They have some of the best music in the world. The beats that are used in some of the music is so different and unique. I do not even speak Romanian but the music sounds so good. I am thinking about learning it one day, and as for their dancing. I've found many videos where they are incredible in all style of dancing. Viva Romania!

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Re: Romanian Discussion Group

Postby Seachd12 » 2013-04-11, 1:04

I'm curious about the Romanian word or term for "lapel pin". Google doesn't help much, and if I had a gun to my head and had to guess, I'd take the plunge with "ac de rever". I have no idea if that's correct or would even be understood, or even if the concept really means anything in Romania.

Does anyone have better ideas?

Thanks!

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Re: Romanian Discussion Group

Postby AdiJapan » 2013-04-11, 14:44

Seachd12 wrote:I'm curious about the Romanian word or term for "lapel pin". Google doesn't help much, and if I had a gun to my head and had to guess, I'd take the plunge with "ac de rever". I have no idea if that's correct or would even be understood, or even if the concept really means anything in Romania.

In Romanian ac never has this particular meaning of pin. If you say ac de rever people will think you're talking about a meaningless needle that you stick into your lapel and they'll miss the idea of a symbol.

You can say insignă, which is generally translated as badge, but always refers to the sort of small badge that you wear on your chest, lapel or hat (military beret, etc.), that is, not something like the police badge. If you really want to restrict the meaning to the lapel use, you can say insignă de rever, which is perfectly understandable, although rather unusually precise. I'd go with just insignă.
[flag]ro[/flag] maternă  [flag]us[/flag] pretty well  [flag]fr[/flag] pas mal  [flag]ja[/flag] 順調

Seachd12
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Re: Romanian Discussion Group

Postby Seachd12 » 2013-04-11, 21:23

AdiJapan wrote:In Romanian ac never has this particular meaning of pin. If you say ac de rever people will think you're talking about a meaningless needle that you stick into your lapel and they'll miss the idea of a symbol.

You can say insignă, which is generally translated as badge, but always refers to the sort of small badge that you wear on your chest, lapel or hat (military beret, etc.), that is, not something like the police badge. If you really want to restrict the meaning to the lapel use, you can say insignă de rever, which is perfectly understandable, although rather unusually precise. I'd go with just insignă.


Thanks a lot!

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Re: Romanian Discussion Group

Postby pittmirg » 2013-05-14, 18:51

Salut, I've got another 'ye olde' question: is the particle ja 'already' (I am told it existed) still used by any românophones or has it been universally replaced by deja?
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Re: Romanian Discussion Group

Postby Levike » 2013-05-14, 21:09

"Deja" is the word that we all use.

I never heard of any "ja".
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Re: Romanian Discussion Group

Postby pittmirg » 2013-05-16, 22:27

I guess it's really archaic then, if such a form really existed.
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Re: Romanian Discussion Group

Postby AdiJapan » 2013-05-17, 14:28

pittmirg wrote:is the particle ja 'already' (I am told it existed) still used by any românophones or has it been universally replaced by deja?

Where did you find the information that a ja "particle" ever existed?

The word deja appeared in Romanian around the 19th century, more probably the second half, so if it really did replace an older word, it should be easy to find what that word was.

But what I can already tell you is that before deja entered the regular use, people used to say the same thing (and still do) using phrases like de pe acum, de-acuma, încă de pe acum, etc. when the verb is in the present tense, and the same phrases with atunci instead of acum for past or future.

So I'm guessing there was no short word with the same meaning, because if there was, then it wouldn't have made sense for it to disappear and get replaced by longer phrases.
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Re: Romanian Discussion Group

Postby pittmirg » 2013-05-18, 15:47

AdiJapan wrote:
pittmirg wrote:is the particle ja 'already' (I am told it existed) still used by any românophones or has it been universally replaced by deja?

Where did you find the information that a ja "particle" ever existed?


I've got it from a co-forumer who has studied something Romanian-related at university. Maybe he got some interference (apparently French used to have ).

But what I can already tell you is that before deja entered the regular use, people used to say the same thing (and still do) using phrases like de pe acum, de-acuma, încă de pe acum, etc. when the verb is in the present tense, and the same phrases with atunci instead of acum for past or future.


Limba română — pirahã Europei. really. :))
So I'm guessing there was no short word with the same meaning, because if there was, then it wouldn't have made sense for it to disappear and get replaced by longer phrases.


French did lengthen its 'already' at one point, maybe it was becoming too indistinct. Also words get replaced for extralinguistic reasons...
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Re: Romanian Discussion Group

Postby AdiJapan » 2013-05-19, 6:11

pittmirg wrote:
So I'm guessing there was no short word with the same meaning, because if there was, then it wouldn't have made sense for it to disappear and get replaced by longer phrases.

French did lengthen its 'already' at one point, maybe it was becoming too indistinct. Also words get replaced for extralinguistic reasons...

Actually that wasn't a lengthening of a previous "already". The Old French word ja used to mean something else: "at this/that moment", that is, either "now" or "then". Together with dès, meaning "since" or "starting from a certain point", it made up the present day déjà.

But I agree it is possible for short words to be felt as too indistinct for the meaning they carry and so to get somehow lengthened to give them more force. It doesn't seem to be the case here, neither in French déjà, nor in Romanian deja.
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Re: Romanian Discussion Group

Postby pittmirg » 2013-05-20, 20:04

AdiJapan wrote:Actually that wasn't a lengthening of a previous "already". The Old French word ja used to mean something else: "at this/that moment", that is, either "now" or "then". Together with dès, meaning "since" or "starting from a certain point", it made up the present day déjà.


Well, I've found a few trustworthy-looking sites which claim it could mean "already", in Old French or at a later point. Perseus even suggests that already iam could mean that. Though it seems to me that there are many contexts where now/then-type words and already-type words overlap and it may be hard to determine whether the author meant simply now/then or specifically now/then-while-not-in-the-past.

http://www.cnrtl.fr/definition/ja
http://www.utexas.edu/cola/centers/lrc/ ... -MG-X.html
But I agree it is possible for short words to be felt as too indistinct for the meaning they carry and so to get somehow lengthened to give them more force. It doesn't seem to be the case here, neither in French déjà, nor in Romanian deja.


Aujourd'hui is another example, or Common Slavic *(j)u-že (cf. Lithuanian jau) or many other Slavic adverbs extended with (a reflex of) the emphatic *-že.
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Dozzer
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Re: Romanian Discussion Group

Postby Dozzer » 2013-09-15, 13:20

Greetings. I am a new member of this community and I have decided to register due to my high interest in linguistics, an object that I also study in the high school that I attend.

I am relatively young (16 y.o.) and therefore I hope I will not cause any problems around here :D

As a native Romanian speaker, I can offer help in regards to this language, should anyone need it. I also consider myself to be fluent in English and intermediate in French.

Best regards, and may we all get along with each other :)
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Re: Romanian Discussion Group

Postby shirkka » 2013-11-17, 16:49

Salut!
M-am pierdut de mult de acest forum, dar tocmai l-am regasit.
Mai vorbeste careva romana pe aici? :)
Care sunt ultimele noutati lingvistice?

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Re: Romanian Discussion Group

Postby ~jakip » 2014-01-03, 1:40

Hi! I tried to make the plural of these feminine but I don't know if they're right:
Diplomă - Diplome
Palmă - Palme
Pauză - Pauze
Pernă - Perne
Persoană - Persone
Oră - Ore
Cameră - Camere
Adresă - Adreșe
Adeverință - Adeverințe
Chiuvetă - Chiuvețe
Fereastră - Fereaștre
Fiică - Fiice
If somebody helps me with these plural, I'd be happy :D
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Correct me whenever you want. Helps are more than welcome.


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