Discussion Group for General Hebrew Questions

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Re: Discussion Group for General Hebrew Questions

Postby AlanF_US » 2015-08-26, 20:54

Thanks for answering my previous question, Golv.

What are the differences between זרק and השליך, if any? And can either of them, when followed by a direct object X, mean the equivalent of either the English "throw X" or "throw X away" (that is, throw X into the trash and forget about it)?

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Re: Discussion Group for General Hebrew Questions

Postby Babelfish » 2015-08-28, 18:21

Well, according to my good old Even-Shoshan dictionary, they're pretty much synonyms... but in the usage I'm familiar with, זרק can have both meanings, while השליך is more "to throw away"(and isn't used often in speech).

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Re: Discussion Group for General Hebrew Questions

Postby jessiespeck » 2015-09-20, 3:33

I am thinking of naming my child Adiel. I do not know Hebrew, but I see that Adi comes from the root ada meaning "ornament", but is identical to a root ada with a noun derivative "meaning " prey". The name Adi is listed as meaning "ornament, witness, prey", but Adiel is listed as " ornament of God" or "witness of God". Obviously I don't want to make my child something negative, so I was wondering how closely these roots are actually related. I appreciate any help, especially seeing as how I'm scheduled to have the baby this Thursday!

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Re: Discussion Group for General Hebrew Questions

Postby Golv » 2015-09-22, 17:08

I am not aware of any such meaning of the root, and unfortunately, have no dictionary at hand at the moment. Can you provide your sources and/or cite some text where the root is used in this sense?

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Re: Discussion Group for General Hebrew Questions

Postby AlanF_US » 2015-09-25, 19:13

Can one write/say both

אני מדבר עברית

and

אני דובר עברית

and if so, what's the difference?

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Re: Discussion Group for General Hebrew Questions

Postby Babelfish » 2015-09-25, 20:15

אני דובר עברית = I am a Hebrew speaker. This is used only to indicate that one knows a certain language.
אני מדבר עברית = I speak /am speaking Hebrew. This can also mean one knows a certain language (more colloquial than the above) as well as that one is speaking it right now etc.
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מן המקום בו אנו צודקים לא יפרחו לעולם פרחים באביב (יהודה עמיחי)
From the place where we are in the right, flowers will never grow in the spring (Yhuda Amihay)

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Re: Discussion Group for General Hebrew Questions

Postby Saim » 2015-10-17, 10:59

מה המשמעות של "לא דופק חשבון"? שמעתי בשיר הזה:

https://takhles.bandcamp.com/track/--12

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Re: Discussion Group for General Hebrew Questions

Postby Lemanensis » 2015-10-17, 11:25

Saim wrote:
מה המשמעות של "לא דופק חשבון"? שמעתי בשיר הזה:

https://takhles.bandcamp.com/track/--12


Morfix gives
לֹא דָּפַק חֶשְׁבּוֹן (למישהו)
(slang) "not give a damn!"

But I'd like to know how it's used. Would you say
"אני לא דופק חשבון לו"?
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Re: Discussion Group for General Hebrew Questions

Postby Golv » 2015-10-17, 13:14

Yes, but:

If the indirect object is a personal pronoun (or more accurately, a preposition with attached persoal suffix), it should come immediately after the verb. This is universally true.

So it has to be אני לא דופק לו חשבון, but one may say אני לא דופק חשבון לאף אחד (here I could place אף אחד in just about any position in the sentence).

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Re: Discussion Group for General Hebrew Questions

Postby Lemanensis » 2015-10-17, 14:48

Golv wrote:it should come immediately after the verb. This is universally true.


מגניב. תודה לך!
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Re: Discussion Group for General Hebrew Questions

Postby Lemanensis » 2015-10-17, 14:51

Golv wrote:So it has to be אני לא דופק לו חשבון, but one may say אני לא דופק חשבון לאף אחד (here I could place אף אחד in just about any position in the sentence).


And
אני לא דופק חשבון אל זה.
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Re: Discussion Group for General Hebrew Questions

Postby Lemanensis » 2015-10-24, 9:28

Definite smichut forms

In his essential grammar, Glinert has opted for forms such as
העורך-דין
הבן-אך

and so on.
Now, I'd heard that this was sometimes done in speech but was considered sloppy. But the fact that it's actually used in a grammar book makes me wonder just how common and acceptable it is among natives.

As an example of how far he's prepared to go in the colloquial vs formal:
"The feminine pronouns הן and אתן are rather formal and typical of newscasters, newspapers, books and so on. In casual usage, their masculine counterparts ... are used instead, thus:
הבנות? נו, הם בצה׳׳ל. "

I'm all for avoiding stilted language but there are still limits that shouldn't be crossed by educated speakers IMO.
What do you, the sabra, think? Any advice?
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Re: Discussion Group for General Hebrew Questions

Postby Lemanensis » 2015-10-24, 10:33

Babelfish wrote:Well, according to my good old Even-Shoshan dictionary, they're pretty much synonyms... but in the usage I'm familiar with, זרק can have both meanings, while השליך is more "to throw away"(and isn't used often in speech).


So this means that the sentence
?האם הוא זרק את הכדור
means both 'Did he throw the ball?' and 'Did he throw the ball away?'

So, to specify the second example, you'd need to say
?האם הוא זרק את הכדור לזבל

Is that right, or the most natural?
Martin
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Re: Discussion Group for General Hebrew Questions

Postby AlanF_US » 2015-10-30, 3:01

Babelfish, thanks for answering my latest question. I'm looking forward to seeing the answers to Lemanensis's questions. And here's a new one from me: How do you say "chickpea" or "chickpeas" when you're referring to them in the raw state, or in a preparation other than hummus? Morfix quotes a Hebrew Wikipedia article that seems to suggest that חומוס is used for both the cooked and the uncooked varieties. Is that right?

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Re: Discussion Group for General Hebrew Questions

Postby Lemanensis » 2015-10-30, 7:03

AlanF_US wrote:Babelfish, thanks for answering my latest question. I'm looking forward to seeing the answers to Lemanensis's questions. And here's a new one from me: How do you say "chickpea" or "chickpeas" when you're referring to them in the raw state, or in a preparation other than hummus? Morfix quotes a Hebrew Wikipedia article that seems to suggest that חומוס is used for both the cooked and the uncooked varieties. Is that right?


Hi Alan

If you look at a recipe such as http://humus101.com/?p=4 it looks like גרגרי חומוס, though some others also mention just חומוס...
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Re: Discussion Group for General Hebrew Questions

Postby Lemanensis » 2015-10-31, 13:43

Lemanensis wrote:
AlanF_US wrote:Babelfish, thanks for answering my latest question. I'm looking forward to seeing the answers to Lemanensis's questions. And here's a new one from me: How do you say "chickpea" or "chickpeas" when you're referring to them in the raw state, or in a preparation other than hummus? Morfix quotes a Hebrew Wikipedia article that seems to suggest that חומוס is used for both the cooked and the uncooked varieties. Is that right?


Hi Alan

If you look at a recipe such as http://humus101.com/?p=4 it looks like גרגרי חומוס, though some others also mention just חומוס...


I've just checked the Larousse French-Hebrew dictionary, and it gives חימצה and חומוס, with חימצה first. Searching for the latter term in Morfix, the reference quotes Wikipedia makes it sound like חומוס is simply the Arabic name for חימצה and then strictly speaking the term for the dish rather than the raw material.
Martin
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Re: Discussion Group for General Hebrew Questions

Postby AlanF_US » 2015-11-01, 15:32

I see. Thanks.

Another question: How does one say "As time goes on" in Hebrew?

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Re: Discussion Group for General Hebrew Questions

Postby Lemanensis » 2015-11-02, 7:07

AlanF_US wrote:I see. Thanks.

Another question: How does one say "As time goes on" in Hebrew?


ok, again not for me to say, but what about translating it as 'with the passage/passing of time' בחלוף זמן? Would that fit your context?
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Re: Discussion Group for General Hebrew Questions

Postby Golv » 2015-11-10, 12:20

Lemanensis wrote:
AlanF_US wrote:I see. Thanks.

Another question: How does one say "As time goes on" in Hebrew?


ok, again not for me to say, but what about translating it as 'with the passage/passing of time' בחלוף זמן? Would that fit your context?


בחלוף הזמן*

"עם הזמן" או "ככל שהזמן עובר" בשפה דיבורית יותר.

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Re: Discussion Group for General Hebrew Questions

Postby AlanF_US » 2015-11-23, 3:15

Thanks, Golv.

New question: In English, there are the following words:

"compassion" (purely positive connotations; implies an ability to be kind to another in a respectful way)
"empathy" (also purely positive; represents an ability to be able to feel what another is feeling)
"sympathy" (generally positive; often used in response to someone who has suffered a loss)
"pity" (can be positive or negative; can involve some condescension)

and
"self-pity" (almost always negative).

Tellingly, there is no single word that expresses compassion for oneself.

In Hebrew, how are these terms represented, and are their connotations positive, negative, or mixed?


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