Language Course

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Mulder-21
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Language Course

Postby Mulder-21 » 2003-10-18, 3:45

Part 0: An introduction to the Faroese tutorial

Faroese is a language derived from the Old Norse language of the Scandinavian and Jutland-peninsulas. Norwegian Vikings, who spoke Old Norse, colonised the Faroe Islands in approx. 825. In the 11th century, Old Norse was divided into two languages, Western and Eastern Norse. Eastern Norse was spoken in modern-day Sweden and Denmark, while Western Norse was spoken in Norway, the Shetlands, the Orkneys, northern Scotland, especially the Outer Hebrides, the Dublin region of Ireland, the Faroe Islands, Iceland and southern Greenland.

In the 15th century Faroese separated from Western Norse, but clear dialectal difference can be found already in 1298 in the so-called “Seyðabrævið”. A Shetlandic “Seyðabrævið” was also written in 1299. This dialect of Faroese is usually called Medieval Faroese. Certain things were written in Medieval Faroese, but after the Reformation in 1538, Danish became the school, church, court and literary language.

Following the Revolutions in the early 19th century, a spelling system was developed in 1846 by the priest, Vencelaus Ulricus Hammershaimb, or V.U. Hammershaimb, as he’s referred to here. This system is still used today, although with slight modifications, e.g. the original had x, while the modern hasn’t.

An interesting fact about Faroese and the Nordic language Norn, which used to be spoken in the Shetlands, is the fact that they were mutually intelligible. But sadly, the English language has replaced Norn.

Faroese is classified in the Western Norse sub-family of the North Germanic branch of Indo-European, which means, that languages like Danish, Swedish, German, English, Romanian, Ukrainian and Farsi are more or less related to Faroese. The closest relatives, however, are Icelandic, Norwegian and the now extinct Norn. The Eastern Norse languages are Danish and Swedish and these are also closely related to Faroese.

Today, Faroese is spoken by approx. 70-80,000. 48,000 of these live in the Faroe Islands and the rest are pretty much scattered around the Northern part of Europe. Due to the financial crisis in the early 1990’s, many Faroese moved to Denmark, and many haven’t returned (yet).

The Faroe Islands themselves are a small group of islands located between Iceland, Scotland and Norway. There are 18 islands, 17 of which are inhabited. The largest cities are the capital Tórshavn (17.000), Klaksvík (6.000), Runavík (2.000), Tvøroyri (2.000) and Fuglafjørður (1.600).
Last edited by Mulder-21 on 2004-12-19, 2:41, edited 1 time in total.
Gløgt er gestsins eyga. (Føroyskt orðafelli)
Wise is the stranger's eye. (Faroese saying)
L'occhio dell'ospite è acuto. (Proverbio faroico)
Hosťovo oko je múdre. (Faerské uslovie)

Fluent: Faroese, Danish, English, German
Almost fluent: Norwegian, Swedish
Basic: Slovak (studying), Spanish
Have studied: Hebrew, Russian
Interests: Ukrainian, Romanian, Italian, Albanian, Armenian, Ossetic, Hungarian, Estonian, Baltic languages

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Lesson I: Articles

Postby Mulder-21 » 2003-10-18, 3:49

Lesson I:

Like most languages, Faroese uses articles. There are two articles, the indefinite ein/eitt and the definite hin/hitt. The definite article is usually an ending, and is then –in in masculine and feminie and –ið in neuter.

Ein and hin are used for masculine and feminine nouns and eitt and hitt for neuter nouns.

Ein bilur = A car
Ein kona = A woman
Eitt skip = A ship

However, the Faroese use of articles is somewhat different from English.

Faroese does not, like English, use the indefinite article when expressing a job or a nationality:

Hann er lærari. = He’s a teacher.
Hon er avstraliari. = She’s an Australian.
Tú ert amerikanari. = You’re an American.
Eg eri lækni. = I’m a doctor.

However, the indefinite articles are used if an adjective precedes the noun:

Hann er ein vánaligur lærari. = He’s a bad teacher.
Hon er ein innføddur avstraliari. = She’s a native Australian.
Tú ert ein innføddur amerikanari. = You’re a native American.
Eg eri ein góður lækni. = I’m a good doctor.

It’s also used when a relative clause follows the noun:

Hann er ein lærari, ið býr í Tórshavn. = He’s a teacher, who lives in Tórshavn.
Hon er ein avstraliari, ið býr í USA. = She’s an Australian, who lives in the USA.
Tú er ein amerikanari, ið býr í Kalifornia. = You’re an American, who lives in California.
Eg eri ein lækni, ið starvast í Miðafrikalýðveldinum. = I’m a doctor, who works in the Central African Republic.

It’s not used when expressing hundred or thousand.

Fleiri enn túsund fólk vóru til dystin. = More than a thousand people went to the match.
Hann eigur minst hundrað fløgir. = He owns at least a hundred CDs.

Neither in the case where countable nouns are used:

Hann roykir pípu. = He smokes a pipe.

The definite noun is almost always an ending:

Bilur - Bilurin. = Car – The car
Kona – Konan. = Woman – The woman
Skip – Skipið. = Ship – The ship

A prefix can be added when an adjective precedes the noun:

(Hin) Grái bilurin = The grey car.
(Hin) Vakra konan = The beautiful woman.
(Hitt) Stóra skipið = The big ship.

The prefix is not used in front of sama (same) or ordinal numbers:

Vit fara sama veg sum tey. = We’ll go the same way as they do.
Hettar var fyrstu ferð, hon sá hann gráta. = This was the first time she saw him cry.

And only in two exceptions, with countries, cities and place names:

Danmørkin = Denmark
Jørðin = Earth

The definite article is used with uncountable nouns in Faroese, and nouns that describe general things:

Hann er troyttur av lívinum.* = He’s tried of life.
Søgan endurtekur seg ofta = History often repeats itself.
Tíðin lekir øll sár. = Time heals all wounds.

* This noun is in the dative case. More on this later.

A third word is sometimes used as an article, and it is tann in masculine and feminine and tað in neuter. This word is in fact a demonstrative pronoun.

Toyota var tann bilurin, ið seldi mest í Føroyum í 1999. = Toyota was the most selling car in the Faroe Islands in 1999.
Estonia var tað skipið, ið hevur kravt mest fólkalív í norðurlendskari skipasøgu. = Estonia was the ship, which has taken most lives in Nordic marine history.

In these two cases, it can be discussed whether or not it's necessary to use tann/tað, since removing them won't change the meaning of the sentences.
Last edited by Mulder-21 on 2004-12-08, 3:00, edited 2 times in total.
Gløgt er gestsins eyga. (Føroyskt orðafelli)
Wise is the stranger's eye. (Faroese saying)
L'occhio dell'ospite è acuto. (Proverbio faroico)
Hosťovo oko je múdre. (Faerské uslovie)

Fluent: Faroese, Danish, English, German
Almost fluent: Norwegian, Swedish
Basic: Slovak (studying), Spanish
Have studied: Hebrew, Russian
Interests: Ukrainian, Romanian, Italian, Albanian, Armenian, Ossetic, Hungarian, Estonian, Baltic languages

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:D

Postby Strigo » 2003-10-18, 13:30

Hi!

Hey, Hurrah!

The lessons are great! I don't have any doubts so far!.

Could you write some vocabulary? :)

And some pronunciation :P You can write some excersices also, it'd be kinda feedback!.


Bye!
Aquí es donde traduzco diariamente música israelí del hebreo al español

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Postby Ozymandias » 2003-10-18, 16:03

Wonderful!! :!: :D

The Faroese course! :D :D

It's looks like it's going to be very interesting.

I agree though with Strigo, though, how does one pronounce Faroese?

If half the people on the Faroe islands are a persistant and diligent as you are in spreading the language, then I think English may have a serious competitor for international language! :lol:


Ozy

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Postby Psi-Lord » 2003-10-18, 17:59

Ozymandias wrote:I agree though with Strigo, though, how does one pronounce Faroese?

I believe that's when serious headaches start. ;)

Even though I don't think I'll be studying Faeroese, I'm keeping an eye on the thread, too — very interesting so far, just like the Wiki articles, Johan Petur. :)
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Postby Car » 2003-10-19, 20:15

I'll definitely follow it, too. Exercises would be great, since I've finished my Norwegian course, I might start learning Faroese. :D

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Postby Evgenij » 2004-04-06, 13:54

Mulder-21. Please!!! Proceed!!!

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Postby bloodhammer » 2004-04-06, 14:47

Very good looking so far... I'll keep an eye out for this!

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Postby Evgenij » 2004-04-17, 13:53

Does anybody want to know how does one pronounce Faroese, he can hear it here
http://www.framtak.com/

MUCH LOVE

Postby MUCH LOVE » 2004-04-18, 1:31

DOES FAROESE MEAN FAROESTE

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Postby Evgenij » 2004-04-19, 15:46

I suppose not though I don't know what does "faroeste" mean.
Faroese is the language of Faroe Islands.

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Postby Mulder-21 » 2004-05-15, 1:27

Hi, all you lovely people, who faithfully follow this thread.

I'm really sorry, that I haven't posted anything these last many months, but it's due to the fact, that I'm really busy with school. Hopefully, I'll get to do more with this thread in late June and July, but unfortunately I can't promise anything.

I've been thinking about posting questions regarding the first two lessons, but sofar nothing good has come out of it. Questions will occur in later lessons, though.

Anyway, if you have any questions, that you simply just have to ask right away, then feel free to contact me.

See you around

Johan Petur Dam

- - - - - - - - -

Hey, øll tit deiligu fólk, ið trúligani fylgja hesum tímum.

Tað harmar meg almikið, at eg ikki havi skrivað meira hesar síðstu mánaðirnar, men hetta kemst av tí, at eg havi so nógv skúlating. Vónandi, fái eg gjørt meira við hetta síðst í juni ella í july, men tíanverri fái eg ikki lovað nakað.

Eg havi hugsað um, at skriva nakrar spurningar viðvíkjandi hesar báðar fyrstu lærutímarnar, men sum er, er einki komið burturúr. Spurningar koma tó seinni.

Men um tit annars hava spurningar, ið tit mugu spyrja her og nú, haldið tykkum so ikki aftur við at seta tykkum í samband við meg.

Vit síggjast

Johan Petur Dam
Last edited by Mulder-21 on 2004-05-16, 23:31, edited 1 time in total.

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Postby Evgenij » 2004-05-15, 12:51

I've found some Faroese proverbs but unfotunately I don't understand them:

Føroysk orðatøk um mat og drekka

Allir halda feita gás í annans garði.
Átarin goymir sær eftirbita.
Betur draga tveir fuglar í reiðrið enn ein.
Eingin skal annans bita eta.
Fátøk kona gevur høsnareggið út, og vil hava gásareggið aftur.
Fjandin er hálur um at halda.
Frott er høvur av fullum maga.
Hann, ið ikki etur seg mettan, sleikir seg ikki mettan.
Hann, ið kúnna eigur, gongur halanum næstur.
Ilt er at binda hund við smørleyp.
Leys er annars kúgv á bási.
Maður eigur at verða føddur, og ikki gøddur.
Rædd er hond í annans fati.
Tað er bót á borði.
Tað verður ikki alt fleytir, tiril kemur í.

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Postby senatortombstone » 2004-06-04, 19:12

http://www.ielanguages.com/index.html


Above is a link to a website where our erstwhile teacher has posted a document that goes into further detail regarding the Faroere language. I too would like to learn this language and maybe I will at a later date. I will at least learn the basics when he returns.

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Postby rattylhed » 2004-11-14, 1:39

hallå! i found out about Faroese through a band's songs (Tyr... www.tyr.net) and I got really interested in learning the language... i'm gonna check out the links you guys posted.

some of it looks a bit similar to swedish. but i need to find out how to pronounce this stuff, cos i'm lost!!
- Tina

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Ljóni

Postby Guest » 2004-11-14, 2:27

Attemp to speak a little faroes:

góðan dag.
Eg eiti Ljóni og elska norðurlundin

Mær finnst föroysku mikit vokru,
og tað lítir eins og íslensku.

Guest

Postby Guest » 2004-11-14, 7:12

do you know where i could find a good Faroese dictionary online?

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Postby JackFrost » 2004-11-15, 0:37

Anonymous wrote:do you know where i could find a good Faroese dictionary online?

www.bn.com

try that

Mars

Postby Mars » 2005-05-06, 22:46

MUCH LOVE wrote:DOES FAROESE MEAN FAROESTE

Faroese is Føroyskt on Faroese ;) It's the name off the language that the people of Faroe Islands (Faroese people) speak.
England-English, Føroyar-Føroyskt (Faroe Islands-Faroese, Danmark-Dansk (Denmark-Danish).

For Evgenij: Very loosely translated.
(I'm not that good at english, so forgive me)

Føroysk orðatøk um mat og drekka

1.Allir halda feita gás í annans garði.
2.Átarin goymir sær eftirbita.
3.Betur draga tveir fuglar í reiðrið enn ein.
4.Eingin skal annans bita eta.
5.Fátøk kona gevur høsnareggið út, og vil hava gásareggið aftur.
6.Fjandin er hálur um at halda.
7.Frott er høvur av fullum maga.
8.Hann, ið ikki etur seg mettan, sleikir seg ikki mettan.
9.Hann, ið kúnna eigur, gongur halanum næstur.
10.Ilt er at binda hund við smørleyp.
11.Leys er annars kúgv á bási.
12.Maður eigur at verða føddur, og ikki gøddur.
13.Rædd er hond í annans fati.
14.Tað er bót á borði.
15.Tað verður ikki alt fleytir, tiril kemur í.

is on Faroese:

Faroese dictionary about food (mat) and drinking (drekka)

1.Everyone keeps fat goose in the others garden (or something like that).
2.Átarin goymir sær eftirbita (don't know how to translate).
3.It's better to drag two birds to the nest then one.
4.No one is to eat someone elses "chop-of-bread" (small part of a bread slice).
5.Poor woman gives her chicken egg out, and want's a goose egg in return.
6.The enemy is slippery to hold... (...something missing here).
7.Frott er høvur av fullum maga (don't know this either).
8.He/she who doesn't eat him/herself full, dosn't lick him/herself full. (hope you can get some sort off further knowledge after this small lesson).
9.He who owns the cow, follows its tale.
10.It's hard to tie a dog with a butter"leyp" (don't know what it is right now, it's probably a old word for rope, but I can fix all this in the coming weeks, hopefully)
11.Leys er annars kúgv á bási (can't realy do it now, but it is about a cow that is loose :o/)
12.Man is supposed to be born, not stuffed.
13.Other mans hand on a plate is scared.
14.Tað er bót á borði.(can't figure out right now)
15.Tað verður ikki alt fleytir, tiril kemur í.(can't figure out right now)

Please note, that I'm not that good at English. And the time now is almost 24 GMT, and I was kinda drunk last night.
But hopefully some offf those translations can be usefull.

Martin Andreas Kruse, Faroe Islands

Mars

This post, and the post above is written by Mars

Postby Mars » 2005-05-06, 22:59

JackFrost wrote:
Anonymous wrote:do you know where i could find a good Faroese dictionary online?

www.bn.com

try that


There realy isn't any out there. But you can probably buy one thrue the internet.
Because we are only some 60.000 people who know and speak this language, an internet dictionary hasn't been launched yet. But if you can wait some years, then it will probably show up sometimes within the next 15 years or so :wink:
Else you can check these links for some News sites on Faroese:

http://www.portal.fo (The portal of the Faroese Telecom)
http://www.sosialurin.fo (Faroese news paper)
http://www.dimma.fo (Faroese news paper)


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