"In some dialects of American English, \th\ is regularly replaced by \f\."

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Mars80
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"In some dialects of American English, \th\ is regularly replaced by \f\."

Postby Mars80 » 2016-11-28, 17:52

it says in the merriam-webster pronunciation guide.

In some dialects
of American English, \th\ is regularly replaced by \f\.


http://assets2.merriam-webster.com/mw/s ... iation.pdf

which dialects? i thought this was more of a british english thing.

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Re: "In some dialects of American English, \th\ is regularly replaced by \f\."

Postby linguoboy » 2016-11-29, 9:46

AAVE varieties.
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Re: "In some dialects of American English, \th\ is regularly replaced by \f\."

Postby schnaz » 2017-02-14, 22:27

I'm thinking that they are referring to a /th/ at the end of a word so that for example the word "math" might be pronounced "maf" in African American Vernacular English. I will start to listen for it .
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Re: "In some dialects of American English, \th\ is regularly replaced by \f\."

Postby Woods » 2017-02-18, 0:17

British /ð/ sounds like /v/ to me sometimes.
Last edited by Woods on 2017-02-26, 23:24, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: "In some dialects of American English, \th\ is regularly replaced by \f\."

Postby Babbsagg » 2017-02-26, 10:22

Woods wrote:British /θ/ sounds like /v/ to me sometimes.


Are you sure you mean /θ/ and not /ð/? For example, in Cockney "think" (/θ/) becomes "fink", and "mother" (/ð/) becomes "mover". Afaik. Can't think of any case where /θ/ would become /v/.
Thank you for correcting mistakes!

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Re: "In some dialects of American English, \th\ is regularly replaced by \f\."

Postby Woods » 2017-02-26, 23:23

Babbsagg wrote:
Woods wrote:British /θ/ sounds like /v/ to me sometimes.

Are you sure you mean /θ/ and not /ð/? For example, in Cockney "think" (/θ/) becomes "fink", and "mother" (/ð/) becomes "mover". Afaik. Can't think of any case where /θ/ would become /v/.


I mean /ð/, indeed - I've made a mistake :)

I haven't noticed the /θ/ becoming /f/, but /ð/ really does sound strikingly /v/ when it comes to some Brittish speakers.

I don't know if it's exactly /v/ or just something more v-ish than the standard /ð/ - maybe someone with a more trained ear like linguoboy the allmighty master of the English phonology could tell :)

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Re: "In some dialects of American English, \th\ is regularly replaced by \f\."

Postby Babbsagg » 2017-02-27, 0:38

I think the /θ/ becoming /f/ is mainly a Cockney thing, where they hardly seem to use any th-sound at all.
Thank you for correcting mistakes!

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Re: "In some dialects of American English, \th\ is regularly replaced by \f\."

Postby linguoboy » 2017-02-27, 15:28

Babbsagg wrote:I think the /θ/ becoming /f/ is mainly a Cockney thing, where they hardly seem to use any th-sound at all.

Originally a Cockney feature, it's now being incorporated into Estuary English. It's also spreading to noncontiguous working-class accents such as Glaswegian.
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Re: "In some dialects of American English, \th\ is regularly replaced by \f\."

Postby schnaz » 2017-03-02, 15:18

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Madea#/issues

The above link is for anyone interested in AfroAmerican vernacular English.

MADEA GETS A JOB is a cd I have and it has Spanish and English audio and Spanish and English subtitles. Hope u like it.
"What a revoltin´ development this is." Daffy Duck


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