IpseDixit - English

Moderator: JackFrost

User avatar
Dormouse559
Language Forum Moderator
Posts: 5851
Joined: 2010-05-30, 0:06
Real Name: Matthew
Gender: male
Country: US United States (United States)

Re: IpseDixit - English

Postby Dormouse559 » 2016-12-07, 1:26

IpseDixit wrote:What does "lead someone over" mean?
To me it just means "to lead someone to a certain location". You'll see "over" used like that with other verbs, like in "come over", "bring over" and "send over".
N'hésite pas à corriger mes erreurs.

User avatar
IpseDixit
Language Forum Moderator
Posts: 8743
Joined: 2013-05-06, 21:06
Gender: male
Location: Bologna (originally from Florence)
Country: IT Italy (Italia)

Re: IpseDixit - English

Postby IpseDixit » 2017-04-05, 16:38

Does the adjective "either" imply an inclusive disjunction or an exclusive disjunction? Or does it depend on the context?

For example: "he might make either cake for your party", does this also include the possibility that he could make both cakes?

User avatar
linguoboy
Posts: 19327
Joined: 2009-08-25, 15:11
Real Name: Da
Location: Chicago
Country: US United States (United States)

Re: IpseDixit - English

Postby linguoboy » 2017-04-05, 16:44

IpseDixit wrote:Does the adjective "either" imply an inclusive disjunction or an exclusive disjunction? Or does it depend on the context?

For example: "he might make either cake for your party", does this also include the possibility that he could make both cakes?

I would say no. To express an inclusive disjunction, you'd need to say something like "He might make either cake for your party, or both" or "He might make one or both cakes for your party".
"Richmond is a real scholar; Owen just learns languages because he can't bear not to know what other people are saying."--Margaret Lattimore on her two sons

User avatar
IpseDixit
Language Forum Moderator
Posts: 8743
Joined: 2013-05-06, 21:06
Gender: male
Location: Bologna (originally from Florence)
Country: IT Italy (Italia)

Re: IpseDixit - English

Postby IpseDixit » 2017-04-05, 16:45

linguoboy wrote:
IpseDixit wrote:Does the adjective "either" imply an inclusive disjunction or an exclusive disjunction? Or does it depend on the context?

For example: "he might make either cake for your party", does this also include the possibility that he could make both cakes?

I would say no. To express an inclusive disjunction, you'd need to say something like "He might make either cake for your party, or both" or "He might make one or both cakes for your party".


Ok, thanks!


Return to “English”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests

cron