Scots

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Lauren
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Re: Scots

Postby Lauren » 2013-02-06, 6:10

Here's an awesome song in Doric Scots:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9gLC4h0_C1Q

Es one's gaen oot tae all ma hameloons! :mrgreen: Scots is so adorable.

Be sure to check out his other songs!
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johnklepac
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Re: Scots

Postby johnklepac » 2013-02-11, 22:22

I've never had much of a desire to learn Scots due to its sheer proximity to English. I wouldn't know how impressive I should rank mastering it as an accomplishment.

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Re: Scots

Postby Lewis91 » 2013-03-05, 23:40

I realise this was posted a while ago, but I thought I would try and fill in the gaps anyway.
Aleco wrote:Scots - Norwegian - English (of Scots word) - English (of Norwegian word)

keek - kikke - look - look
ken - kjenne - know - know (a person)
dook - dukke - bathe/duck - duck/go underwater
plouk - plukke - pimple/spot - pick (v)/almost nothing (n)
puggled - ???
crabbit - ???grumpy/cantankerous
howff - hoff - haunt/meeting-place - a monarch's personal subjects (Norse: farm)
glieket - glikke - stupid/gormless - turn out the wrong way (v) / smt tech. coming to a standstill
muckle - mykje (Norse: mykill) - great/big - much/a lot
guff - guffe - crap or unpleasant smell - gross, often thick liquid ( also means 'to fart' or you can say that someone is speaking 'a load o' guff')
ben - ??? hill
hoor - hore - whore - whore
midden - ??? don't relly know how to explain this one, just know you'd say 'ye derty midden'
naebuddynaeb'die - ??? nobody
radge - rase - mad - to be furious / to fall apart
baffies - ??? slippers!
hae - ha - have - have
napper - nappe/neppe - head - put together / to jerk
nicht - natt - night - night
feert - fælt - afraid - horrible
blaw - blåse - blow - blow
peenie - ???
gan - gå (Norse: ganga) - go - walk
een - øyne - eyes - eyes
dee - dø (Norse: dey(ja)) - die - die
erse - ???Irish language or 'arse'
foosty - ???rank/rotten
baith - både - both - both
craw - kråke - crow - crow
brae - brå - road on hill - sudden / steep
sook - suge - suck - suck
doon - ???down
breeks - bukser - pants - pants
wifie - viv - (aging) woman - old wife (arch)
heid - ???head
poke - pose - bag - (plastic, paper) bag
drookit - drukken - soaked - drunk / soaked (arch) (drukne = drown)
dicht - ???
heifer - fe - cow/big woman - cow/idiot
jobie - ??? poo
bogie - buse - snot - firm snot
bairn - barn - child - child
braw - bra - fine - fine/great/good
kirk - kirke - church - church
seek - sjuk - sick - sick

Lewis91
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Re: Scots

Postby Lewis91 » 2013-03-06, 0:12

Am I the speaker of a distinct language or just a dialect of English? What do you all think?

http://www.scotslanguage.com/articles/view/2294

How much of this Peter kinnen extract can you understand?

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Ciarán12
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Re: Scots

Postby Ciarán12 » 2013-10-20, 12:44

Lewis91 wrote:Am I the speaker of a distinct language or just a dialect of English? What do you all think?

http://www.scotslanguage.com/articles/view/2294

How much of this Peter kinnen extract can you understand?


My 2 cents: it's a different language. This strained mutual inteligibility for me, I had to concentrate, and even so I missed bits frequently enough. There just aren't any other "dialects" of English that do that to this extent. Like, if AAVE and Dublin English are different dialects, you need a new word to describe the difference between Dublin English and this - there just way more different.

This is great though, I love half-understanding it! So much so that I don't actually want to learn it, it would ruin the weird semi-comprehensibility that I like :)
Beidh Gaeilge líofa chruinn bhlasta agam nó go bhfaighe mé bás san iarracht!

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Saim
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Re: Scots

Postby Saim » 2013-12-02, 20:56

That's seriously awesome. <<gh>> is [x]? :D "Very" is "gae"?

I don't have the feeling that that's my language, no. It was quite hard to understand, so I wouldn't classify it as English.

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Ciarán12
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Re: Scots

Postby Ciarán12 » 2014-07-23, 22:19

Saim wrote:"Very" is "gae"?


It just occurred to me that that might have come from Scots Gaelic "glè" - "very". Or that could be me making up bullshit folk etymology.
Beidh Gaeilge líofa chruinn bhlasta agam nó go bhfaighe mé bás san iarracht!

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Saim
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Re: Scots

Postby Saim » 2014-07-24, 0:31

I just checked some online dictionaries and they seem to think it's a variant of gay.

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Re: Scots

Postby vijayjohn » 2016-08-07, 18:48

Saim wrote:"Very" is "gae"?

I was just looking through this thread again and suddenly thought maybe this comes from good. Compare Northwestern (Cumberland) English [ðʊwz ɛd ə gæː fɪʊw], which IIRC means 'you've had quite a few' (something like "thou's had a good few"?).


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