Scots

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neoni
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Re: Pronouncing Help for Cuimhnich air na daoine o'n d'thaining

Postby neoni » 2009-07-15, 15:44

i'm making a lentil dahl in my slow cooker for dinner tonight and i just had a wee taste of it and it's going to be really good. i'm really looking forward to eating it. mmm
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Re: Is anybody here actually a NATIVE speaker of Scots?

Postby moujick » 2009-07-17, 21:44

DenshaOtoko wrote:
neoni wrote:ah am an aw but ah dinnae like writin it doon. ayeways looks a bit dumb.


Aye. Ah agree wae ye. Lukks a bit stupit tae me.

moujick wrote:Ah'm ur tae!!! (the Ayrshire variety)


Aye. Ah'm fae Ayrshire anaw. :)


Whauraboots ur ye?

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Re: Scots Lessons

Postby moujick » 2009-07-17, 21:58

elvisrules wrote:
moujick wrote:An anither hing, ah'd like tae ken whit yer distinction atween Scottish English an Scots English is?

I dinnae ken wat ye mean by Scots English: a form o Scots leid mair influenced by English but no fair Scottish English? Or daed ye juist mean Scots?


Thats whit ah wis askin ay ThomasUK, ah don't see a distinction atween Scottish English and Scots English...but ah dae atween Scots and Scottish English.

Ah huv tae say that even atween theam, drawin the line is difficult especially cause folk chynge their register aw the time....ah ken ah dae

fur neoni's post:-

neoni wrote:fae masel 'scots inglis' is the inglis fowk speak in scotland, i.e. wi an accent an wan or twa scots words like 'aye' etc. jist no 'standard english'

"Aye, I cannae remember where he lives."
vs.
"Aye, Ah cannae mynd far he bides."

but fit dae ah ken


Ah hink he's richt but ah wid coont the saicant as Scots.

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Re: Is anybody here actually a NATIVE speaker of Scots?

Postby moujick » 2009-07-17, 22:02

DenshaOtoko wrote:
neoni wrote:ah am an aw but ah dinnae like writin it doon. ayeways looks a bit dumb.


Aye. Ah agree wae ye. Lukks a bit stupit tae me.

moujick wrote:Ah'm ur tae!!! (the Ayrshire variety)


Aye. Ah'm fae Ayrshire anaw. :)


Huv tae say ah'm no way youse oan this wan. Only lukks styipuit cause we're aw condeetiont tae hink ay it like that.......it's the Scottish cringe.

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i need a translation

Postby tuckstruckin17 » 2009-09-27, 6:12

i was wondering if anyone could translate a tattoo idea i have.. the word "breathe" and l"ive laugh and love" into scottish gaelic

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Re: i need a translation

Postby Johanna » 2009-09-27, 13:35

Wrong forum, posting a question about Gaelic here is about as smart as asking one about Icelandic in the Italian forum ;-)
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Re: i need a translation

Postby YngNghymru » 2009-09-27, 18:29

Not QUITE as stupid, since the two are at least spoken in the same country. But still pretty stupid. :P

Brethe. Lyve, lacht an lov (hurrah for archaic spellings).
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Re: i need a translation

Postby Johanna » 2009-09-27, 23:33

YngNghymru wrote:Brethe. Lyve, lacht an lov (hurrah for archaic spellings).

That's really beautiful :)

I wonder why people always want tattoos in Gaelic when Scots is just as cool, easier to pronounce and certainly isn't any less pleasing to the ears :hmm: Especially since the chance that someone's ancestors spoke Scots is bigger than that they spoke Gaelic.
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Re: i need a translation

Postby Eoghan » 2009-09-28, 0:02

Johanna wrote:
YngNghymru wrote:Brethe. Lyve, lacht an lov (hurrah for archaic spellings).

That's really beautiful :)

I wonder why people always want tattoos in Gaelic when Scots is just as cool, easier to pronounce and certainly isn't any less pleasing to the ears :hmm: Especially since the chance that someone's ancestors spoke Scots is bigger than that they spoke Gaelic.


Ehem. You shouldn't forget the fact that Scottish Gaelic was and is still spoken all over mainland Scotland and the Western Isles, so it's not that unusual with a Gaelic ancestor if you're Scottish. Regarding the tattoos I still agree though.
And Scots is not easier to pronounce. Its spelling just seems to be easier than the Gaelic one.

Anns a' Ghàidhlig;

Ehem, Chan chuir thu air cùl gun robh Gàidhlig a bha bruidhinn feadh gach mòr-thir agus na h-Eileanan Siar an Alba, is às a seo, chan eil e annasach gun robh Gàidhlig aig na sinnseaire a bha agad ma tha Albannach a th'annad. Ach, mu na sgeadan-craicinn, tha mise còrd riut a dh'aindeoin sin.
Agus chan eil Beurla Ghallda nas farasta a' labhair. Bi mar an speiligeadh aige nas furasta na an litreachadh Gàidhlig air eiginn.
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Albeit the Scot in me is of the Western stock and the red of the Cairngorms, the heather and the Lewissian gneiss, the Viking in me was there when you uttered the first word of your leid.

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Re: i need a translation

Postby Johanna » 2009-09-28, 0:50

Eoghan wrote:Ehem. You shouldn't forget the fact that Scottish Gaelic was and is still spoken all over mainland Scotland and the Western Isles, so it's not that unusual with a Gaelic ancestor if you're Scottish. Regarding the tattoos I still agree though.
And Scots is not easier to pronounce. Its spelling just seems to be easier than the Gaelic one.

From what I've read the lowlands have always been more densely populated than the Highlands, and very few in the Lowlands have been speaking Gaelic the last 500 years or so.

I think Scots seems easier to pronounce, but that's maybe because I've heard it a lot more, and I may have some help from speaking Swedish natively, English at an advanced level and knowing some German, all of those closely related to Scots :hmm:
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Re: i need a translation

Postby Travis B. » 2009-09-28, 1:59

I was under the impression that much of the Lowlands of Scotland, especially the eastern parts thereof, as well as the extreme northeast of Scotland were never Gaelic-speaking but rather have been Germanic-speaking (whether Anglic-speaking or Norse-speaking) since about the time presumably Brythonic language previously spoken there had been displaced, and that the notion of a uniformly previously Gaelic-speaking Scotland is more a modern Romantic notion more than anything else. (That is, that only the far west of the Lowlands, particularly Galloway, were ever Gaelic-speaking to begin with.)
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Re: i need a translation

Postby YngNghymru » 2009-09-28, 7:25

That's about right. If I remember correctly, the gaels came from Ireland in the first place, making the native celtic language of Scotland Pictish, rather than Gaelic, which is a descendant of Old Irish.

Interestingly, the Gaelic name for the Western Isles means 'isles of the foreigners' (or something like that)... and now they're pretty much the only place it's spoken. [/trivia]
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Re: i need a translation

Postby Eoghan » 2009-09-28, 8:29

YngNghymru wrote:That's about right. If I remember correctly, the gaels came from Ireland in the first place, making the native celtic language of Scotland Pictish, rather than Gaelic, which is a descendant of Old Irish.

Interestingly, the Gaelic name for the Western Isles means 'isles of the foreigners' (or something like that)... and now they're pretty much the only place it's spoken. [/trivia]


That's true, na h-Innse Gall means the Foreigners' Isles, and it refers to the fact that these islands belonged to the Vikings for quite some time. This is also one of the reasons why Lewis Gaelic has a distinct Nordic/Scandinavian feel to it ... And whether Pictish was a Celtic language or not we cannot but guess, no written sources remain so it's really up to our fantasy I guess. What is sure though is that some of the oldest Welsh texts stem from southern Scotland, as Cumbrian Welsh was spoken in Cumbria and the Clyde Valley (Ystrad Cluid) whereas Gaelic, as you say, came from Ireland and was spoken in the Dàil Riata areas of Scotland until it gradually erased every trace of the Picts and became the main language of Scotland. Beurla Ghallda, or Scots, existed alongside Gaelic, but mainly in the Lallans area, and thus the traditional northern Scottish dialects sound less Scottish to some listeners, and more sing-songy, and soft, as they are heavily influenced by Scottish Gaelic.

Gaelic was spoken in Argyll before the Roman invasion, it was spoken in the Galloway area by the 5th century, and we mustn't forget that modern Scottish Gaelic is rather a Highland version, as a Lowland Gaelic did exist in the southern parts of Scotland. Caithness Gaelic as a different dialect is now extinct, but certainly was a living language during the 18th century and was spoken all the way up north to Wick.
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Albeit the Scot in me is of the Western stock and the red of the Cairngorms, the heather and the Lewissian gneiss, the Viking in me was there when you uttered the first word of your leid.

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Re: i need a translation

Postby YngNghymru » 2009-09-28, 16:19

Yes indeed.

I think that most linguists agree that Pictish was a celtic language, but are unsure as to which branch it should be placed in because of the lack of written records. But the prevalence of apparently p-celtic names in Scotland (Aberdeen, for example, has the word 'Aber' which is a Welsh place-name element as well) suggests p-celtic.
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Old Scottish Spelling Needed

Postby Clandestined » 2009-10-02, 15:10

I would love to know how to spell both of my kids names in Old Scottish and would appreciate any help.

My boy's name is Kaeden and my girl's name is Kiaryn. I don't think there is a Scottish spelling for Kiaryn (as I created that name as far as I know), but if anyone could give me an idea of a way to spell it in Scottish, that would be great.

As well, I would like to know how to say, "A Mother's Love Eternal" in Scottish.

Thanks so much for your help. :)

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Re: Old Scottish Spelling Needed

Postby YngNghymru » 2009-10-02, 17:45

Another Celtic romanticist? :roll:

You're probably looking for the Gaelic forum, although frankly, if you can't pronounce the name yourself just by looking at it and neither can anyone else, I don't really understand the point.

Scots has no standard spelling, anyway. So you might have a problem there.
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Re: Small Scots Wordlist, with norse/germanic+English

Postby Oscararon » 2009-10-14, 18:43

Swedish translation:

Code: Select all

Scots      ->   Norse/Germanic      ->   English

keek      ->   kika (slang)      ->   look
ken      ->   känna         ->   know
dook      ->       ducka     ->   bathe/duck
plouk      ->      finne*      ->   pimple/spot
puggled      ->            ->   exhausted/knackered
crabbit      ->            ->   ill-tempered
howff      ->            ->   haunt/meeting-place/regular
glieket      ->            ->   daft/stupid/gormless
muckle      ->            ->   great/big/mighty
guff      ->      skit*      ->   crap or unpleasent smell
ben      ->            ->   in/towards (eg. to a room in the house)   
hoor      ->      hora      ->   Whore
Midden      ->            ->   Like a tip/mess, slag (human or otherwise)
naebuddy   ->            ->   nobody
radge      ->            ->   mad, furous; mental person
baffies      ->            ->   slippers
hae      ->      ha      ->   have
napper      ->      huvud      ->   head
nicht      ->       natt     ->   night
feert      ->      rädd*      ->   afraid
blaw      ->      blåsa      ->   blow
peenie      ->            ->   apron
gan      ->      gå      ->   go
een      ->      ögon     ->   eyes
dee      ->      dö      ->   die
erse      ->      arsle      ->   Arse (from "irish")
foosty      ->            ->   mouldy, musty
baith      ->      båda      ->   both
craw      ->      kråka      ->   Crow
brae      ->            ->   road on a hill
sook      ->      suga      ->   suck
doon      ->            ->   down
breeks      ->      brallor (slang for byxor)      ->   Trousers
wifie      ->            ->   woman, usually aging
heid      ->            ->   head
poke      ->            ->   bag
drookit      ->            ->   drenched, soaked
dicht      ->            ->   wipe
heifer      ->            ->    cow/big woman
jobie      ->       bajs*     ->   turd/shit
bogie      ->      snor*      ->   snot/mucus
bairn      ->     barn       ->   child
braw      ->   bra         ->   fine, nice
kirk      ->   kyrka         ->   church
seek      ->   sjuk      ->   sick


*The word in Swedish even though it has no connection to the Scots/English word.

It's a few at least, I don't have time for more and some of them might be wrong, it's a start at least. :D
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Re: Small Scots Wordlist, with norse/germanic+English

Postby kjeks » 2009-10-14, 19:24

howff -> jakt -> haunt/meeting-place/regular

I don't think this is the right translation. I would sooner associate the word howff with the Norwegian 'hoff' meaning court (as in the king's court)

How about these words:

beck - bekk - stream

flit - flytte - move house
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Re:

Postby linguoboy » 2009-10-14, 20:28

DelBoy wrote:I would guess that breeks (or britches in English) comes from the Irish (and Scots Gaelic?) 'bríste', meaning trousers.'

Naw, when you see slender st within an Irish morpheme, it's usually a sign of a borrowed word with a [ʤ] or [ʧ] that got flipped, e.g. page > páiste, bagage > bagáiste, coach > cóiste, etc. So it is with briste; this is merely English breeches (from Common Germanic *bro:ki) in Gaelic guise. Lack of palatalisation is a common Scots/Northumbrian trait, cf. kirk, kist ("chest"), brig ("bridge"), etc., so breeks is exactly the outcome we would expect for Anglo-Saxon bréc in Scotland.
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Re: Small Scots Wordlist, with norse/germanic+English

Postby YngNghymru » 2009-10-14, 22:24

Yeah, I think the Gaelic word is a germanic borrowing, rather than Scots/English having borrowed it from Gaelic.
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