Lëtzebuergesch

Any language which does not have a specific forum can have a thread made for it here.
User avatar
Saaropean
Posts: 8808
Joined: 2002-06-21, 10:24
Real Name: Rolf S.
Gender: male
Location: Montréal
Country: CA Canada (Canada)

Lëtzebuergesch

Postby Saaropean » 2003-01-25, 16:45

Ech weess, datt vill Leit hei exotische Sprooche léiere wëllen. Ech kenn eng exotesch Sprooch, an ech si prett dat mat iech ze deelen, wann dir interesséiert sidd. :)

I know many people here want to learn exotic languages. I know an exotic language, and I'm willing to share it with you if you're interested. :)


Wie wär u Lëtzebuergesch interesséiert? Lëtzebuergesch ass eng germanesch Sprooch mat vill franséische Wierdern. D'Sprooch huet eng offiziell Schreifweis (1999 reforméiert), déi vun d'däitsch a franséisch Schreifweis afgeleet ass.
D'Sprooch gëtt net nëmmen in d'Groussherzogtom Lëtzebuerg (de klengsten a räichsten EU-Land) geschwat, mä och am Arelerland an d'Belsch. D'Dialekte vum Museldall an Däitschland a Frankräich sinn enke Verwanten.

Who would be interested in Luxembourgish? Luxembourgish is a Germanic language with many French words. The language has an official spelling (reformed in 1999), which is derived from German and French spelling, taking into account the different Luxembourgish vowels.
The language is not only spoken in the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg (the smallest and richest EU country), but in the Arlon region of Belgium, too. The dialects of the Moselle valleys in Germany and France are close relatives.

Image

Leider gëtt et net vill Ressource fir dës Sprooch, an dat allermeescht ass op Franséisch, Däitsch odder Lëtzebuergesch geschriwwen.
Mä ech kënne bal alles, wat dir braucht om d'Grondlage vun dëser Sprooch, déi vu manner wéi en halw Milliou Leit an Europa geschwat gëtt, zesummestellen odder iwwersetzen...

I'm afraid there are not many ressources for this language, and most are written in French, German or Luxembourgish.
But I could compile and translate almost everything you need to know about the basics of this language spoken by less than half a million people in Europe...


Wann dir interesséiert sidd, seet mir w.e.g., ob dir un enge Lëtzebuergesch-Cours matmaache wëllt, odder ob dir léiwer (Iwwersetzunge vu) Referenzen iwwer d'Grammatik, Schreifweis an Aussprooch hutt. :)

If you're interested, please tell me whether you'd like to participate in a Luxembourgish course, or whether you would prefer (translations of) references about the grammar, spelling and pronunciation. :)
Last edited by Saaropean on 2003-02-02, 13:26, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
proycon
Server Administrator
Posts: 2668
Joined: 2002-06-20, 20:22
Real Name: Maarten van Gompel
Gender: male
Location: Eindhoven
Country: NL The Netherlands (Nederland)
Contact:

Postby proycon » 2003-01-25, 16:55

Well, I`m too busy with other languages to start learning Luxembourgois, but I regularly listen to it! When I wake up very early here (at 6am) then our commercial TV channel RTL4 emits the news in Lëtzebuergisch (simply because their schedule didn`t start yet and because the station originates in Luxembourg).. After listening for a while I can understand about 70% of what`s said! With my german and french background it`s a very interesting language! But no, I won`t learn it.. I`m still too busy with Russian :) And then I want to learn Mandarin, which has a lot more speakers than Luxembourgois :)
Language is the dress of thought -- Samuel Johnson
Image
my homepage

User avatar
Car
Forum Administrator
Posts: 9894
Joined: 2002-06-21, 19:24
Real Name: Silvia
Gender: female
Country: DE Germany (Deutschland)
Contact:

Postby Car » 2003-01-25, 17:39

Well, I'd be interested in a course as well as in references, although I won't really study it intensively. :D

User avatar
Axystos
Posts: 2054
Joined: 2002-06-25, 18:39
Real Name: Marc
Gender: male
Location: Dutchman living in Germany

Postby Axystos » 2003-01-25, 18:55

ob dir un engem Lëtzebuergesch-Cours matmaachen wëllt, odder ob dir léiwer (Iwwersetzungen vun) Referenzen iwwer d'Grammatik, Schreifweis a Aussprooch hutt.


Well..I might be interested in a Luxemburgisch course. Since a couple of months we receive tv channels from the digital ASTRA satellite, and one of the channels is the Luxemburgish music channel "Tango TV" (which, in my opinion, is the only reasonably good music channel that we can receive here. "Viva 2" ruled, but is dead now. :( ). Sometimes I hear the VJ's talk in Luxemburgish, and it can really irritate me sometimes that it resembles german so much, but that I still can't understand completely what is said..

But what exactly do you mean by 'participate in a Luxembourgish course'? Do a course, so that I can learn the language, or make one for others?

Axystos.
Native: Nederlands; C2: Deutsch; C1: English;
B1: русский, français, 日本語;
A2: norsk, svenska; A1: português, italiano, español, čeština, polski

User avatar
Saaropean
Posts: 8808
Joined: 2002-06-21, 10:24
Real Name: Rolf S.
Gender: male
Location: Montréal
Country: CA Canada (Canada)

Postby Saaropean » 2003-01-25, 21:30

Axystos wrote:But what exactly do you mean by 'participate in a Luxembourgish course'? Do a course, so that I can learn the language, or make one for others?

I thought about trying to teach the language to others in our virtual school, similar to Pa-Integral's Catalan course and Daniel's Gaelic course.

Prior knowledge of German (better: Moselle Franconian :wink:) makes it easier to learn Luxembourgish, but I wouldn't require it.

User avatar
Axystos
Posts: 2054
Joined: 2002-06-25, 18:39
Real Name: Marc
Gender: male
Location: Dutchman living in Germany

Postby Axystos » 2003-01-28, 21:45

Saaropean wrote:I thought about trying to teach the language to others in our virtual school, similar to Pa-Integral's Catalan course and Daniel's Gaelic course.


Mmm..that would mean that the speed of the course would depend on the teacher, on how often (s)he'd post new lessons, and not on for example how quickly the learners would like to learn it.
And some learners learn quicker than others...

Axystos.

PS Is the Luxemburgish word order the same as the German one? It looks like it (in your first post) so that's why I'm asking.
Native: Nederlands; C2: Deutsch; C1: English;
B1: русский, français, 日本語;
A2: norsk, svenska; A1: português, italiano, español, čeština, polski

User avatar
Leviwosc
Posts: 4739
Joined: 2002-06-28, 3:38
Real Name: Reinaldus Adreanus
Gender: male
Location: Tilburg
Country: NL The Netherlands (Nederland)
Contact:

Postby Leviwosc » 2003-01-29, 0:37

I understand Luxembourgisch without to many problems, realy early in the morning, we can see Luxembourgian television. And I understand it quite good! The written part isn't also a problem.

I think none of the Dutch, Belgians and Germans has to many problems to understand Luxembourgian. At least, when you speak Dutch and German. I speak both languages, Luxembourgian is a mix of Dutch and German, I guess.

At least, Luxebourgian is not a langauge I want to learn. It's only spoken in Luxembourg. The country is even smaller than the Netherlands, it has the same size of the province "Drenthe" in the Netherlands. I can't use the language somewhere else outside Luxembourg. So I won't put any energy into a study. But I don't need, because I can understand a text. I can't speak it or write it, but I understand it.

With kind regards,
Ron de Leeuw
The Netherlands
Image Image | Image Image Image Image | Image Image Image

User avatar
Saaropean
Posts: 8808
Joined: 2002-06-21, 10:24
Real Name: Rolf S.
Gender: male
Location: Montréal
Country: CA Canada (Canada)

Postby Saaropean » 2003-01-29, 12:45

Axystos wrote:
Saaropean wrote:I thought about trying to teach the language to others in our virtual school, similar to Pa-Integral's Catalan course and Daniel's Gaelic course.

Mmm..that would mean that the speed of the course would depend on the teacher, on how often (s)he'd post new lessons, and not on for example how quickly the learners would like to learn it.
And some learners learn quicker than others...

Yes, that might indeed a problem. That's why I basically see two ways of using our virtual school of languages:

1) Someone teaches a language from scratch, writing lessons and exercises for the very beginners. Different speeds are problematic, but possible if the teacher organizes it well.

2) Someone gives web sites that explain the grammar of the language as well as dictionaries. Then the learners can browse through that, write texts in the language and ask questions to other learners and/or the coordinator.

Up to you to decide...

Since Luxembourgish is so close to German and Dutch, the first option is not necessarily for speakers of those languages.
But I don't want to exclude potential learners, just because they don't speak German or Dutch... :?

Axystos wrote:Is the Luxemburgish word order the same as the German one? It looks like it (in your first post) so that's why I'm asking.

Basically Luxembourgish is just a German dialect, so the grammar is pretty much the same. I can't think of any differences in word order, except in cases where you use a different formulation...

Ron wrote:Luxembourgian is a mix of Dutch and German, I guess.

No, that's not right. Let me show you a simplified family tree of the German languages:

GERMANIC LANGUAGES
- NORTH GERMANIC (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Faeroese, Icelandic)
- WEST GERMANIC
--- Scots
--- English
--- Frisian
--- Dutch
--- Low German (Plattdeutsch)
--- Middle German
------ east: Saxonian, Thuringian
------ west:
--------> Hessian (around Frankfurt)
--------> Rhine Franconian (Saarbrücken, Kaiserslautern)
--------> Moselle Franconian (including Luxembourgish)
--------> Ripuarian (around Cologne)
--- German (Hochdeutsch)
--- Upper German (Austrian, Badenian, Bavarian, Franconian, Swabian, Swiss German)

So Luxembourgish is closer to Dutch than German is, but it's not a mixture. Luxembourgish is a Middle German dialect with lots of French words and less High German words than in other dialects. But that's because of the history of the country...

Daniel wrote:Letzeburgish! ...or Luxembourgish (both are correct) :wink:

Didn't I always write Luxembourgish?
Letzeburgish looks terrible. :? First, the trema on the E is missing (which makes it look as if the E was not stressed), then you add the English ISH to the German BURG... :x

So I would write 卢森堡语 in Chinese, Luxemburgisch in German, luxembourgeois in French, Lëtzebuergesch in Lux. and Luxembourgish in English. :P

Ron wrote:It's only spoken in Luxembourg. The country is even smaller than the Netherlands, it has the same size of the province "Drenthe" in the Netherlands. I can't use the language somewhere else outside Luxembourg. So I won't put any energy into a study.

Of course you don't need the language. :wink: But who needs Gaelic, which is also taught in the virtual school of languages? :roll:
It would be just for fun, and I offer this to anyone who's interested, even without prior knowledge of German (or Dutch). :D

User avatar
Axystos
Posts: 2054
Joined: 2002-06-25, 18:39
Real Name: Marc
Gender: male
Location: Dutchman living in Germany

Postby Axystos » 2003-01-30, 0:30

Saaropean wrote:Yes, that might indeed a problem. That's why I basically see two ways of using our virtual school of languages:

1) Someone teaches a language from scratch, writing lessons and exercises for the very beginners. Different speeds are problematic, but possible if the teacher organizes it well.

2) Someone gives web sites that explain the grammar of the language as well as dictionaries. Then the learners can browse through that, write texts in the language and ask questions to other learners and/or the coordinator.

Up to you to decide...


Well..I'd vote for the second option. Especially since I already know the german wordorder, and so the Luxembourgish wordorder, too.
I think only learning the words and word-endings is what I'd have to do...right?

Axystos.
Native: Nederlands; C2: Deutsch; C1: English;
B1: русский, français, 日本語;
A2: norsk, svenska; A1: português, italiano, español, čeština, polski

User avatar
Saaropean
Posts: 8808
Joined: 2002-06-21, 10:24
Real Name: Rolf S.
Gender: male
Location: Montréal
Country: CA Canada (Canada)

Postby Saaropean » 2003-01-30, 6:51

Axystos wrote:I think only learning the words and word-endings is what I'd have to do...right?

Not quite. :? Basically there are four kinds of words in Lux.: dialect words like eppes (something), French words like Pompjeeën (fire brigade, from "pompiers"), words of German origin like léieren (to learn, from "lernen") and German loan words like Fön (hairdrier).
So it's a little more complicated... :D

Especially commonly used words can be very different. And don't forget that many words come from French. When the Police /'pOlis/ comes to a Traffikaccident /'trafik aksi'dEnt/, that doesn't resemble German very much... :roll:

And there are at least two grammatical differences: The ommision of a final N before vowels and certain consonants, and the use of the definite article with a person's name. :wink:

User avatar
E}{pugnator
Posts: 2074
Joined: 2002-06-24, 17:27
Real Name: Expug
Gender: male
Location: Vitoria da Conquista (living in Belo Horizonte)
Country: BR Brazil (Brasil)

Postby E}{pugnator » 2003-01-30, 10:27

I'd be interested in Luxembourgish,but not to learn it now...I already learn German and Norwegian, and i can even mix these two, i didn't start with dutch 'coz i was sure i'd mix it all up...I'd just be interested in having a look at the grammar, discuss something about the linguistic background, and nothing more by now..But I'd still visit a VLS thread...

I work with Germanic languages the same way I do with the Romance ones...I start with two, that I can learn from the basics (German and Norwegian - English has too much latin vocabulary, it indeed helps me more learning Italian and French than german and norwegian!) and after I get to an intermediary level (which is getting closer in German but still distant in Norwegian) I can choose another one (let's say, Dutch), 'coz I'll already be able to tell to which language a word belongs, i'll have learned most of the nouns, adjectives endings, the most common words, and I won't say things like..."Hvorfor haben Sie Deutsch gelernt?" (Everytime I can't remember a german word or don't remember it, I automatically use a Norwegian one, and vice-versa).
Learning Georgian, Mandarin Chinese, Russian and Papiamentu from scratch. Trying to brush up my Norwegian up to an advanced level.

User avatar
Saaropean
Posts: 8808
Joined: 2002-06-21, 10:24
Real Name: Rolf S.
Gender: male
Location: Montréal
Country: CA Canada (Canada)

Postby Saaropean » 2003-01-30, 10:37

This morning, I've been to the language center of my university to find some books about Luxembourgish grammar (articles, pronouns etc.).
I've just started copying this information into a Luxembourgish grammar reference, similar to the one I wrote for German.

There's going to be one major difference between the Lux. and the German grammar reference: The German one was written trilingually for beginners. The one for Lux. will have three different versions: one for beginners (in English), one for French speakers (in French) and one for German speakers (in German), so people of different backgrounds (those who have a prior knowledge of German and those who don't) can learn something.

I'm not going to start a thread in the Virtual School of Languages before more people say they want it.
I prepared some first lessons for very beginners (who don't speak German), but no one seems to be interested yet...

User avatar
Zoroa
Posts: 2025
Joined: 2002-12-13, 16:53
Gender: male
Location: NYC
Country: FR France (France)

Postby Zoroa » 2003-01-30, 20:20

Hey Saar, do you know where the word Foen (hairdryer) comes from ?
It's from the region where I live in France (Savoie) : un feun (Swiss also say un feun for a hairdryer). Originally, it is the wind which blows northwards in the mountains and as it comes from the South, it's quite mild, even warm... Nice word from our voisins luxembourgeois !
Deviens qui tu es !
Nietzsche "Ainsi parlait Zarathoustra"

User avatar
Saaropean
Posts: 8808
Joined: 2002-06-21, 10:24
Real Name: Rolf S.
Gender: male
Location: Montréal
Country: CA Canada (Canada)

Postby Saaropean » 2003-01-30, 20:35

In German, both the hairdryer and the wind (which often occurs in southern Bavaria) are called Föhn. Fön was the old spelling for the hairdryer, which came from Foen (an AEG hairdryer from 1899, named after the wind). The pronunciation is always the same: /fø:n/.
Föhn comes from Middle High German foenne, Old High German phōnno, derived from Vulgar Latin faonius from Latin favonius = spring wind, originating in fovere = to heat.
sources: Duden - Deutsches Universalwörterbuch at www.xipolis.net and http://www.digischool.nl/du/lehrer/dms/ ... 9/foen.php

It's definitely not a Luxembourgish word, because "real Luxembourgish words" don't use the letter Ö or the /ø/ sound. It came directly from German, just as Staubsauger as a synonym for Stëbsmaschinn...

User avatar
NulNuk
Posts: 2116
Joined: 2002-06-21, 11:12
Real Name: Nicolas
Gender: male
Location: the great NulKie empire on the Moon

Postby NulNuk » 2003-01-30, 21:05

I hade read an article from the univercity of Vinna ,that say that
that Luxemburgish ,Dutch and English were the same lenguage in the
bigining ,and only start to spleet in the low lands ,influensed by
Celtic lenguages ,Frisk and Norsk in diferent levels ,and later after
allready splited ,they were influensed again ,by French (English and I think
allso Luxemburgish ,I cant find the article now ,so I write what I remember)
and Dutch by other Germanic lenguages ,and allso I heard a bit by
French and Spanish (the late one I could see the examples just by looking
at Dutch ) .

so Luxemburgish acording to them is not a mixture ,but the same lenguage
thta develop diferent than Dutch ,but it is not a German dialect ,it is a
Saxonian dialect , taked to Luxemburg by the English and the Saxons
in their way to England .
I saw in this article allos a map that shows the diferenses between those
lenguages ,and show some examples of the oldes versions of English
Luxemburgish and Dutch to compare between them and show how
close relative they are ,and they defenetly looked quite like the same
lenguage with little diferenses in the begining jodging from what I saw
there .
I`m not an expert on Luxemburgish (I didnt knew this lenguage exist
before I saw this article a year ago ) ,but those who writed this I guess
they know something .
Every thing I write, wrote, or will write, its in my own opinion, for I have no other.
Release me from the duty of being polite and remind you, "I made use of my own brain".

User avatar
ekalin
Posts: 1850
Joined: 2002-06-21, 11:02
Real Name: Eduardo M Kalinowski
Gender: male
Location: Curitiba, PR
Country: BR Brazil (Brasil)
Contact:

Postby ekalin » 2003-01-30, 23:54

NulNuk wrote:I hade read an article from the univercity of Vinna ,that say that
that Luxemburgish ,Dutch and English were the same lenguage in the
bigining ,and only start to spleet in the low lands ,influensed by
Celtic lenguages ,


Obviously, these could not be missing. Probably there is Celtic influence even in African languages.

User avatar
Axystos
Posts: 2054
Joined: 2002-06-25, 18:39
Real Name: Marc
Gender: male
Location: Dutchman living in Germany

Postby Axystos » 2003-01-31, 10:52

Saaropean wrote:I've just started copying this information into a Luxembourgish grammar reference


When, do you think, will this grammar reference be ready to see online? Approximately? :)

Axystos.
Native: Nederlands; C2: Deutsch; C1: English;
B1: русский, français, 日本語;
A2: norsk, svenska; A1: português, italiano, español, čeština, polski

User avatar
Saaropean
Posts: 8808
Joined: 2002-06-21, 10:24
Real Name: Rolf S.
Gender: male
Location: Montréal
Country: CA Canada (Canada)

Sprachkurs (auf Deutsch)

Postby Saaropean » 2003-01-31, 17:38

Image

Wëllkomm am Lëtzebuergesch-Eck vun der virtuell Sproochenschoul!
Willkommen in der Luxemburgisch-Ecke der virtuellen Sprachenschule!
Welcome to the Luxembourgish corner of the virtual school of languages!
Welkom bij de Luxemburgse hoek van de virtueel talenschool!
Bienvenue au coin luxembourgeois de l'école virtuelle de langues !


Because of the feedback I got in the UniLang forum, I decided to start this Luxembourgish course for people who speak German.
If you don't speak German, but you want to learn Luxembourgish, don't hesitate to contact me, so I can open another thread and teach you Lux. from scratch.


Wie funktioniert dieser Kurs?
Ich werde euch die Besonderheiten des Luxemburgischen Lektion für Lektion erklären. In Lektion 0 beginne ich erst einmal mit einer allgemeinen Einführung in Land und Sprache, in Lektion 1 wird die Aussprache erklärt und in Lektion 2 geht's dann richtig los.
Lektionstexte schreibe ich immer grün, Übungen blau und Korrekturen rot.

Warum ist das alles auf Deutsch?
Weil Lux. eng mit dem Deutschen verwandt ist (man könnte es sogar als deutschen Dialekt bezeichnen), sind die Unterschiede in der Grammatik minimal. Wer bereits Deutsch kann, wird es daher nicht schwer haben, Lux. zu lernen. Andererseits müssen diejenigen, die kein Deutsch können, sich erst mit den Schwierigkeiten der Wortstellung herumplagen...

Wo finde ich lux. Ressourcen im Internet?
Am Ende von Lektion 0 gibt's eine Liste der besten Internet-Adressen.

Kann ich meine Fragen auch in einer anderen Sprache stellen?
Can I ask my questions in another language as well?
Kan ik mijn vragen ook in een andere taal stellen?
Est-ce que je peux aussi poser mes questions dans une autre langue ?Kann ech méng Froen och an enger aner Sprooch stellen?

JO, JA, YES, OUI, SI, NAI, DA, EVET, 对, IGEN...
You are free to post in Catalan, Dutch, English, French, Frisian, Italian, Portuguese, Spanish or any other language I can understand well enough; you don't have to write in German or Lux.
Last edited by Saaropean on 2005-03-12, 18:05, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
Saaropean
Posts: 8808
Joined: 2002-06-21, 10:24
Real Name: Rolf S.
Gender: male
Location: Montréal
Country: CA Canada (Canada)

LEKTIOUN 0

Postby Saaropean » 2003-01-31, 17:41

LEKTIOUN NULL: E klengt Land a séng Sprooch
LEKTION 0: Ein kleines Land und seine Sprache


Das Luxemburgische ist eine der drei Amtssprachen des Großherzogtums Luxemburg. Die anderen beiden sind Französisch und Deutsch. Im Gegensatz zu Belgien, Kanada und der Schweiz gibt es jedoch keine Sprachengrenze. Die Muttersprache des Durchschnitts-Luxemburgers ist Lux., Schulen unterrichten in allen drei Sprachen, Gesetze sind auf Französisch geschrieben, Zeitungen überwiegend auf Deutsch, Medien und Politiker sprechen Lux., Verkehrsschilder sind auf Französisch oder Lux. geschrieben, Kinofilme haben französische und niederländische Untertitel (aus Belgien importiert) und Interviews mit Leuten, die französisch oder deutsch sprechen, müssen nicht gedolmetscht werden.

Lux. gehört zum moselfränkischen Zweig der mitteldeutschen Dialekte. Es ist eng mit den Dialekten an Mosel und Mittelrhein verwandt, etwas entfernter auch mit dem Pfälzischen und Hessischen.
Außerhalb des Großherzogtums werden moselfränkische Dialekte rund um Arlon (Arel) und St. Vith (Zent-Väit) in Wallonien, Trier (Tréier) und Bitburg (Biébreg) in Rheinland-Pfalz und im Saarland sowie Thionville (Diddenuewen) in Lothringen gesprochen.

Das Großherzogtum Luxemburg liegt in Westeuropa. Es grenzt an Deutschland im Osten und Nordosten, Frankreich im Süden und Belgien im Westen und Nordwesten. Im Südosten bildet die Mosel die Grenze zu Deutschland. Die Bevölkerung konzentriert sich auf den Süden rund um die Hauptstadt. Der Norden liegt in den Ardennen, ein Mittelgebirge, das sich über Südost-Belgien bis nach Frankreich erstreckt.
Luxemburg ist das kleinste und reichste EU-Mitglied. Es hat nur etwa 450.000 Einwohner auf 2586 km², aber ein Bruttoinlandsprodukt von fast 20 Milliarden Euro und nur 2% Arbeitslose.
Die Hauptstadt ist Luxemburg (d'Stad). Dort befindet sich auch der Europäische Gerichtshof, das Generalsekretariat des Europäischen Parlaments, der Europäische Rechnungshof, die Europäische Investitionsbank, der Satelliten-TV-Betreiber Astra und die multinationale RTL-Mediengruppe.
Das Schengener Abkommen wurde auf einem Schiff inmitten der Mosel im Dreiländereck Luxemburg-Frankreich-Deutschland unterzeichnet.
Luxemburg (der kleinste Teil von Benelux) ist Gründungsmitglied der Europäischen Gemeinschaften und hatte vor der Einführung des Euro eine mit dem belgischen Franken gleichwertige Währung.
Luxemburg ist seit 1866 parlamentarische Monarchie. Staatsoberhaupt ist Großherzog Henri, Regierungschef Premierminister Jean-Claude Juncker von der CSV (Chrëstlech Sozial Vollekspartei). Französische Vor- und deutsche Nachnamen sind dort völlig normal.
Luxemburg hat weder viel Landwirtschaft noch viel Industrie. Der Reichtum des Landes kommt von einem strengen Bankgeheimnis und niedrigen Steuern, weshalb viele ausländische Banken sich in ihren luxemburgischen Filialen eine goldene Nase verdienen...
Wegen der niedrigen Steuern kommen auch immer Bewohner angrenzender Länder um sich mit Benzin, Kaffee, Zigaretten und Alkohol einzudecken.
Der Ausländeranteil liegt bei etwa 25%, hauptsächlich aus Portugal, Frankreich, Belgien, Deutschland und Italien. Außerdem sind ein Drittel der Arbeitskräfte Pendler aus Nachbarstaaten.

Um zu sehen, wie die luxemburgische Sprache aussieht, schaut euch mal die Nationalhymne an:

Wou d'Uelzecht duerch d'Wisen zéit, (Wo die Alzette durch die Wiesen zieht)
duerch d'Fielsen d'Sauer brécht. (Durch die Felsen die Sauer bricht)
Wou d'Rief laanscht d'Musel dofteg bléit, (Wo die Rebe entlang der Mosel duftend blüht)
den Himmel Wäin ons mécht - (Der Himmel uns Wein macht)
dat ass onst Land, fir dat mir géif (Das ist unser Land, für das wir)
hei nidden alles won. (Hier unten alles tun würden)
Onst Heemechtsland, dat mir sou déif (Unser Heimatland, das wir so tief)
an onsen Hierzer dron. (In unseren Herzen tragen)

O Du do uewen, deem seng Hand (O du da oben, dessen Hand)
duerch d'Welt d'Natioune leet, (Die Nationen durch die Welt leitet)
behitt Du d'Lëtzebuerger Land (Behüte du das Luxemburger Land)
vru friemem Joch a Leed! (Von fremdem Joch und Leid)
Du hues ons all als Kanner schon (Du hast uns alle schon als Kinder)
de fräie Geescht jo ginn. (Den freien Geist gegeben)
Looss virublénken d'Fräiheetssonn, (Lass die Freiheitssonne scheinen)
déi mir sou laang gesinn! (Die wir so lange gesehen haben)


Image

Links:
- Luxemburgische Grammatik (auf meiner Homepage, noch unvollständig)
- Basic Worldlist Luxembourgish (UniLang)
- Sounds of the World (UniLang, einen kleinen Text auf Lux. anhören, muss noch verbessert werden)
- Eis Sprooch (De Website iwwer d'Lëtzebuerger Sprooch)
- dictionnaire français-luxembourgeois (PDF)
- dictionnaire luxembourgeois pour Windows (Freelang)
- Mir léiere Lëtzebuergesch schreiwen (En interaktive Schreif- a Liescours fir Grouss a Kleng)
- The status of the language in Lux. (long text)
- Lux. books on the web (link collection)
- Lux. novels on-line (éditions Phi)
- Correction orthographique informatique appliquée à la langue luxembourgeoise (interesting links on the bottom of the page)
- Download und Übersetzungen der Nationalhymne
- Radio-Télé Lëtzebuerg
- CIA World Factbook
- Luxembourg Tourist Office London

Image Image
Last edited by Saaropean on 2003-02-02, 11:02, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
Saaropean
Posts: 8808
Joined: 2002-06-21, 10:24
Real Name: Rolf S.
Gender: male
Location: Montréal
Country: CA Canada (Canada)

LEKTIOUN 1

Postby Saaropean » 2003-01-31, 22:22

LEKTIOUN EENT: D'Aussprooch
LEKTION 1: Die Aussprache


Die Aussprache des Luxemburgischen basiert auf der deutschen, bei den Vokalen und Diphthongen gibt es aber einige Unterschiede.
Zu Wörtern aus dem Französischen komme ich am Schluss.

VOKALEN / VOKALE
- É und Ë werden wie ein kurzes E oder Ä ausgesprochen. Davon ausgenommen ist EEË, was sich wie das deutsche Wort "Ehe" anhört (wenn man das H nicht ausspricht) und ËEE, was sich wie das EE in "geebnet" anhört. In diesen Fällen schreibt man das Trema jedoch nur, damit nicht drei E hintereinander stehen.
- II entspricht dem deutschen IE, ist also ein langes I.
- Ein langes O oder OO ist im Allgemeinen offen wie das englische AW in "saw".
- Ein Vokal wird nur dann kurz ausgesprochen, wenn er vor mehreren Konsonanten steht. Die einzigen Ausnahmen bilden häufig gebrauchte Wörter wie den (bestimmter Artikel), mat ("mit") oder net ("nicht").
- Dehnungs-H und langes Ö kommen nur in einigen deutschen Lehnwörtern vor.
- Das deutsche Ü wird im Lux. zu É, das kurze Ö zu Ë.

DIPHTONGEN / DIPHTHONGE
- AI, AU und EI sind wie im Deutschen.
- ÉI wird wie das englische AY in "pay" ausgesprochen.
- ÄI ist fast genauso, aber einem halblangem Ä, also eher ÄJ als EJ.
- OU entspricht nicht ganz dem englischen O in "no". Es ist vielmehr ein langes geschlossenes O (wie in "hohl") gefolgt von einem kurzen U (wie in "Mutter").
- OI ist ein langes offenes O gefolgt von einem J, also länger als das deutsche EU. Dieser Laut kommt nur in wenigen Wörtern vor.
- Das deutsche EU wird im Lux. zu EI, ÄU zu AI.

RËTSCHLAUTER / "REIBELAUTE"
- ÄE/ÄER/ÄR ist ein Ä gefolgt von einem kurzen A, als würde man das deutsche Wort "Bär" mit einem gut hörbaren A am Schluss aussprechen.
- IE/IER/IR ist ein langes I gefolgt von einem kurzen A, als würde man das deutsche Wort "Bier" mit einem gut hörbaren A am Schluss aussprechen.
- UE/UER/UR ist ein offenes U gefolgt von einem kurzen A, als würde man das deutsche Wort "Schnur" mit einem gut hörbaren A am Schluss aussprechen.

KONSONANTEN
- C wird in Wörtern aus dem Französischen vor E, I und Y wie ein ß ausgesprochen.
- Ein CH wie in "ich" wird im Lux. meistens wie ein SCH ausgesprochen, manche sprechen es aber auch wie im Deutschen aus.
- Der Artikel d' wird meines Wissens nach immer als T ausgesprochen.
- G wird am Wortende ("Lëtzebuerg") wie das lux. CH ausgesprochen, vor EG, EN, ER und ESCH ("Lëtzebuergesch") jedoch wie ein deutsches J. Vor E oder I kann es auch wie ein französisches J ausgesprochen werden ("Regierung").
- J wird oft wie ein französisches J ausgesprochen. In der alten lux. Rechtschreibung wurde dieser Laut JH geschrieben.
- QU wird wie im Englischen ausgesprochen.
- SS wird nach kurzem Vokal manchmal stimmhaft ausgesprochen, also wie das S in "summen". Ein ß gibt es im Lux. nicht.
- W wird am Wortende oder vor einem anderen Konsonanten immer wie ein F ausgesprochen. Ansonsten (z.B. in "schwätzen") wird das W manchmal wie im Englischen ausgesprochen.


FRANSÉISCHE WIERDER / FRANZÖSISCHE WÖRTER

In einem Rechtschreibkurs für luxemburgische Kinder heißt es:
Mir si jo nët eleng op der Welt, ee Gléck, dofir huele mir aus anere Sprooche Wierder an eis Sprooch op.
Esou hu mir si mat Franséisch, Däitsch, Englesch a Griichesch beräichert.
Verhonze wëlle mir se awer och net: e Gefängnis ass nach ëmmer e Prisong an d'Feierwier sinn nach ëmmer d'Pompjeeën.

Das heißt:
Wir sind ja nicht allein auf der Welt, ein Glück, dafür übernehmen wir aus anderen Sprachen Wörter in unsere Sprache.
So haben wir sie mit Französisch, Deutsch, Englisch und Griechisch bereichert.
Verunstalten wollen wir sie aber auch nicht: ein Gefängnis ist noch immer ein "Prisong" (frz. prison) und die Feuerwehr sind immer noch die "Pompjeeëen" (frz. pompiers).


Image

Es gibt Wörter, die in ihrer Schreibweise unverändert bleiben, Wörter mit französischem Stamm und Wörter, denen man ihre Herkunft nicht mehr ansieht:
1) Barrière, Ministère, Concours, Courage, Trottoir (meist mit lothringer Aussprache, d.h. mit Betonung auf der drittletzten Silbe)
2) Timber, Ensembel, Décisioun, enquêtéieren, Réunioun, résuméieren, Députéierten (mit französischen Nasalen und französischem U, d.h. "Députéierten" wird praktisch "Depütejjerten" ausgesprochen)
3) Jilli, Jelli, Fotell, Wallis, Keess, zerwéieren, Schantjen (mit luxemburgischer Aussprache und französischem J)

Und jetzt wird's verrückt: Den Plural bilden diese Wörter nämlich mit EN:
Trottoiren, Employéen (männlich), Employéeëen (weiblich), Clienten (männlich), Clienteën (weiblich), Camionen
[trottoir = Bürgersteig, employé(e) = Angestellte(r), client(e) = Kunde/-in, camion = Lkw]

Bei zusammen gesetzten Wörtern, die ein französisches stummes E am Schluss tragen, wird dieses Ë geschrieben:
Chancëgläichheet (=Chancengleichheit), Assurancëwiesen (=Versicherungswesen)

Alles verstanden? Es kommt noch dicker: Französische Wörter, die es auch im Deutschen gibt, werden (fast) deutsch geschrieben:
Affär, Aktioun, Aktionär, Büro, Realitéit, Fassad, Sekretär


Und zum Schluss noch ein paar Besonderheiten des Luxemburgischen:

- Deutsch ist nicht die einzige Sprache, in der Substantive groß geschrieben werden, im Lux. macht man das auch.

- Ein N (oder zwei) am Ende eines Worts wird weggelassen, wenn danach nicht D, H, N, T, Z, ein Vokal oder ein Satzzeichen kommt. Beispiele:
Mir sinn doheem. (Wir sind zu Hause)
Si si gär doheem. (Sie sind gerne zu Hause)
Neen, ech ginn dohin. (Nein, ich gehe dahin)
Dohi gi si gär. (Dahin gehen sie gerne)
Si lafen a spillen och. (Sie laufen und spielen auch)
Mir wësse vill, si wëssen näischt. (Wir wissen viel, sie wissen nichts)
Mir spillen haut, si spille mar. (Wir spielen heute, sie spielen morgen)

- Manchmal wird zwischen zwei Wörtern ein einzelnes S eingeführt, was es übrigens auch im Bairischen gibt:
Wann s du mech frees... (Wenn du mich fragst)
so mir wéini s du gees... (sag mir, wohin du gehst)
ob s du wëlls... (ob du willst)



HAUSAUFGABEN:
Macht euch mit dem Luxemburger Akzent vertraut, indem in Luxemburger Radio oder Fernsehen reinhört. :)
Ich habe zwar inzwischen einen neuen Text für Klanken vun der Welt aufgenommen, bin aber kein Muttersprachler...
Last edited by Saaropean on 2003-02-02, 11:06, edited 2 times in total.


Return to “Other Languages”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest