Gagana Sāmoa - Samoan

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Ariki
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Postby Ariki » 2007-09-25, 22:48

Sisyphe wrote:Ego, do you know anything about the intelligibility of Samoan with other Polynesian languages?


Samoan has 58% shared lexical similarity with NZ Maori.

63% with Tongan.

66% with CI Maori.

inei = here


Nei in Eastern Polynesian languages.

inā, 'ole = there


Na/nā in most Eastern Polynesian languages, ena in Rapa Nui.

tafatafa = near


taha in most Eastern Polynesian languages, means 'side'.

i le vā o le.. ma le.. = between.. and..


Intelligible, though usually expressed as 'waenga/rotopu' in most Eastern Polynesian languages. The above sentence actually means 'with in the area of....and the...

maua = take (T. ma'u)


Mau/mou in all Eastern Polynesian languages. The passive suffix is ria (mauria).

'ave = take


Kawe/kave in most Eastern Polynesian languages. Rave in Tahitian, lawe in Hawaiian. In Cook Islands Maori both forms exist (kave, rave).

'aiseā? = why?


No obvious cognate form...

'o le ā le mea? = why?


Intelligible, though what is aha in Eastern Polynesian languages. Ko te aha te mea...in NZ Maori (though this is not the usual way...but its still possible to construct).

'auā = because
leaga = because
'ona = because
'ona 'o = because of
pe 'ā = 'ā (beginning of a sentence) = if, when (conj.) in the future


None of those have cognates as far as I can see, although Samoan pe is probably related to NZ Maori pea, CI Maori pa'a, Hawaiian paha and Rapa Nui peaha all meaning 'perhaps'. PPN *pe-afa.

ina ua = when (conj.) in the past


Cognate to NZ Maori ina (when, used for past and future).

pe 'ana = 'ana (at the beg.) = if (past)
pe 'āfai = if (fut.)
'ae = but
'a'o +verb = while
ina ua uma = after (past)
pe 'ā uma = after (fut.)
'a'o lei = 'ae le'i = before


No cognates in Eastern Polynesian.

Hele au i ka moana = I go to the sea
Ua ola no i ka pane a ke aloha = There is life in a kind reply.


Those are two different uses of i.

The second use marks the stative agent, in this case, ka pane a ke aloha is the stative agent. We know its the stative agent because the verb, ola, is a stative verb. If we put in a patient it would be -

Ua ola no au i ka pane a ke aloha.

By a kind response I am made well.

Of course, our Hawaiian language expert, Mamo, can probably deal more with this.

I have friends who can speak Samoan and my first cousin can speak Niuean. I'll ask some of my friends if they want to join. As for my first cousin, I'm not too sure.

They are not so good, they don't even use accents and macrons, but they explain some things.. at least I got some info about the tense markers.. it says for example that "na" and "sa" are both past tense markers with little or no difference in meaning.


The reason why they don't...is because they already know how to read the language. Lazy, perhaps? While I do advocate for the consistent usage of macrons and marking of the glottal stop it is understandable why they choose not to use such markings. The reason why the markings are used in Hawaiian and New Zealand Maori is to help learners. In New Zealand Maori it has become the defacto way of spelling things sicne that is what is used by government agencies and the media.

Samoan, unlike Eastern Polynesian languages, has two word orders - SVO and VSO.

Se in Samoan as far as I can tell is used in the same way as he is in Hawaiian, Maori and Rapa Nui as a clause marker.

It would seem that it indicates the existance of something but it is not explicitly defined. It is similar to English 'a/an'. Polynesian determiners aren't used in the same way as the English ones are.

When I say te in Maori (the) I am talking about an explicitly defined object/group of objects. But when I use he I am talking about an object/group of objects that are not defined explicitly.

And...I will go to my cousins bebo page and copy the introduction he has in Niuean...
Linguicide IS genocide. :)

He ingoa ōpaki a Riki; he ingoa ōkawa a Ariki.

Riki is an informal name; Ariki is a formal name.

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Ariki
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Postby Ariki » 2007-09-25, 22:49

I tell a lie! Grrr he's deleted it...
Linguicide IS genocide. :)

He ingoa ōpaki a Riki; he ingoa ōkawa a Ariki.

Riki is an informal name; Ariki is a formal name.

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Ariki
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Postby Ariki » 2007-09-25, 22:56

koe tama niue e kapitiga haaku.kitia nakai e koe. iloa foki ni au ke vagahau fakamotu. monuina e nofo haau i ositalia ma kapitiga


I found this on a site somewhere. Its in Niuean.

Have fun translating. I have a feeling I know what it means but without a dictionary I can't be 100% sure.

This is my translation -

The Niuean man is my relation. You know him. I also know how to speak 'island'. (monuina?)....I live in Australia with relations.
Linguicide IS genocide. :)

He ingoa ōpaki a Riki; he ingoa ōkawa a Ariki.

Riki is an informal name; Ariki is a formal name.

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Riptide
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Re: Gagana Sāmoa - Samoan

Postby Riptide » 2010-03-17, 20:37

Wow, I had to go all the way to the last page to find this thread. I see a lot of information has been posted on Samoan. I've been dabbling in this language, so I'll make a contribution...which I'm surprised no one has posted...numbers (the counting kind)!

1 Tasi
2 Lua
3 Tolu
4 Fa
5 Lima
6 Ono
7 Fitu
8 Valu
9 Iva
10 Sefulu
11 Sefulu-Tasi
12 Sefulu-Lua
20 Lua-Sefulu
21 Lua-Sefulu-Tasi
22 Lua-Sefulu-Lua
30 Tolu-Sefulu
40 Fa-Sefulu
100 Selau, Tasi-Selau
200 Lua-Selau
1000 Afe, Tasi-Afe
2000 Lua-Afe
1000000 Miliona, Tasi-Miliona
987654321 Iva-Selau-Valu-Sefulu-Fitu-Miliona-Ono-Selau-Lima-Sefulu-Fa-Afe-Tolu-Selau-Lua-Sefulu-Tasi

To be honest, counting has to be one of the easiest parts of this language. Just know 1-10, 100, 1000, and 1000000 (and higher if you really want to know how to count that high) and you're set.
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Massimiliano B
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Re: Gagana Sāmoa - Samoan

Postby Massimiliano B » 2014-11-21, 9:27

Dette er nemlig Formelen, som beskriver Selvets Tilstand, naar Fortvivlelsen ganske er udryddet: i at forholde sig til sig selv, og i at ville være sig selv grunder Selvet gjennemsigtigt i den Magt, som satte det. (This is namely the formula, that describes the condition of the self, when despair is completely eradicated: by relating itself to itself, and by willing to be itself, the self is grounded transparently in the power which constituted it) (Søren Kierkegaard, The sickness unto death)


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