papua new guinea's culture

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papua new guinea's culture

Postby toksave » 2005-11-04, 1:57

hi everyone, i'd like to open this thread to talk about some details of the culture of papua new guinea. papua new guinea has a diverse culture, inhabited by people of different tribes and ethnic groups, descendents of melanesians, micronesians, and polynesians, they are also said to be related to the ainoid line, these are people with "heavy brow" line who are believed to be descendents of australian aborigine. there are over 700 tribal languages in papua new guinea, english is used for government and political issues, but it is not yet spoken nationwide, the two other official languages nationwide are tok pisin and hiri motu. ever since the colonization of europeans into papua new guinea, christianity has grown and become 90% of the religion most believed in papua new guinea, but there are still some tribal groups that believe in life after death, believes differ from tribe to tribe, but they all have a common believe in the spiritual world, and most of these tribes have a great fear of the "unknown", by honoring the ancestoral spirits they continue to practice their tribal believes, among these believes, is the believe of "cannibalism", cannibalism, is said to not be practiced anymore, but there are certain people that still think it is being practiced, cannibalism, was said to be the cause of the "laughing disease" or kuru and many other causes of death. the most famous celebrations in papua new guinea, are the "singsing" celebrations, the locals dress up in traditional costume according to tribe and they dance wearing colorful flushing makeup and a feathered wig made from human hair and feathers of the "bird of paradise" (papua new guinea's national bird). papua new guinea, has a long history of warfaire and tribal conflicts, these sometimes due to violence by another tribesman or death caused by another tribesman, these conflicts are paidoff by charging the people of the other tribes with pigs and "kina" (shells used for pay), if these demands are not met than the tribes experience a time of conflict that may last months even years. the women in papua new guinea, are traditionaly believed to be inferior to men, since men are the "heads" of the house and have the say in issues regarding tribes, women just take the part as housewives and mothers, although papua new guinea shows signs of improvement in that sence, there are still traditional men that wouldn't consider this proper, after papua new guinea became independent, the government quickly wanted to involve women into the govenment. arranged marriges are more mandatory than they are romantic, these arranged marriges are done to keep the relationship between tribes tight and to gain the inheritans of land, males are usualy inheriters of land and animals left behind by their families. modern life has become essential for most of the people in papua new guinea, and many of the people abandone their tribal lifes to work in the cities and have a better life, papua new guinea is improving everyday and despite of the differences in culture and language, it still holds together as a nation, the nation of papua new guinea.

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Postby ego » 2005-11-13, 23:45

According to a Papuan myth, human beings were taught how to speak by birds. The exciting thing is that in Tok Pisin, "bird" is "pisin"! So although Tok Pisin litterally means "Talk Pidgin", it can also be translated as "birds' talk" which is in an unbelievable accordance to this myth! :D

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Postby Ariki » 2005-11-14, 2:11

I believe that 'Pisin' and Pidgin both etmylogically derive from 'pidgeon', a type of bird :)
Linguicide IS genocide. :)

He ingoa ōpaki a Riki; he ingoa ōkawa a Ariki.

Riki is an informal name; Ariki is a formal name.

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Postby Ariki » 2005-11-14, 2:19

The language of the Polynesian people there is a Samoic outlier, known as 'Takuu'. I've heard a sound recording of it, and, I've read some phrases in Takuu. To me, it resembles the language of Tokelau more.

Like Tikopian and Rennellese, it also has 'r', and retains Proto-Polynesian 'k'.

English - Chief

Samoan - Ali`i
Tokelau - Aliki
Takuu - Ariki

it also has 's', as opposed to 'h'. The people of Takuu according to their oral traditions, are from Samoa originally.
Linguicide IS genocide. :)

He ingoa ōpaki a Riki; he ingoa ōkawa a Ariki.

Riki is an informal name; Ariki is a formal name.

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olsem wanem?

Postby clint » 2005-12-13, 1:23

Gutpela tru long bungim yupela olgeta long hia. Mi hamamas nogut tru long painim dispela kain webpaig long intanet. Emi rait olgeta!

toksave yu karim stret! tenkyu tru long kamapim tokples bilong mipela.

Lukim behain.

<<translation>>
It's very good to meeting you all on here. I'm so very happy to find this kind of webpage on the internet. It's just great!

toksave you are just great! Thanks so much for promoting our language.

See you later.

mipela and yumi = we/our/us.. mipela is exclusive of second person and yumi is inclusive of second person.
Last edited by clint on 2005-12-13, 1:50, edited 2 times in total.

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Postby Ariki » 2005-12-13, 1:28

Nau mai, haere mai e tōku hoa.

Ka koa te ngākau kia kite i a koe i tēnei pae tukutuku. He pai hoki kia kite kua rehita mai ra koe. Tērā pea, me tū koe hei kaiwhakahaere mō tēnei wāhanga o te papa pānui. He whakaaro noa iho.

Nā tōu hoa aroha,

Tāne

Welcome, welcome my friend.

The heart gladdens at seeing you on this website. It is also good to see that you have registered. Maybe, you ought to become a moderator for this part of the message board. Just an idea.

From your friend,

Tāne
Linguicide IS genocide. :)

He ingoa ōpaki a Riki; he ingoa ōkawa a Ariki.

Riki is an informal name; Ariki is a formal name.

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Postby ego » 2005-12-13, 1:40

Mipela hamamas tru long lukim yu long dispela forum clint. Mi bin lainim Tok Pisin long sampela wik. Nau mi no lainim Tok Pisin bilong wanem mi no hevim taim.. tasol mi laik no lusim em. Mi hop yu bai laikim UniLang. Lukim yu bihain

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Postby clint » 2005-12-13, 1:55

ego wrote:Mipela hamamas tru long lukim yu long dispela forum clint. Mi bin lainim Tok Pisin long sampela wik. Nau mi no lainim Tok Pisin bilong wanem mi no hevim taim.. tasol mi laik no lusim em. Mi hop yu bai laikim UniLang. Lukim yu bihain


Hehe.. I think your pidgin grammar is much better than mine :shock:

I didn't learn tokpisin in school. I learnt it by ear. So I think my tokpisin is less formal/gramatically correct than yours..

Well done to you though! It's a fun language. and I know for certain that jokes told in tokpisin are so much more funnier. Hehe.

Laikim.

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Postby toksave » 2005-12-13, 5:37

clint, i am very thankful that you came to unilang, i've been looking for someone who knows tok pisin for quite some time now, feel free to correct me with whatever you find wrong. tenkiu tru, niupela poroman bilong mipela.

sapos mi noken statim niupela lesson, inap yu traim en? nau mi tu nogat taim long wokim lesson na mi winim skul dispela yia na mi pinisim olgeta samting olsem mi mas wokim long dispela mun.

tenkiu, na lukim yu bihain...

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Postby clint » 2005-12-13, 21:30

toksave wrote:clint, i am very thankful that you came to unilang, i've been looking for someone who knows tok pisin for quite some time now, feel free to correct me with whatever you find wrong. tenkiu tru, niupela poroman bilong mipela.
No problems.. I'm just as greatful to have found this forum.
toksave wrote:sapos mi noken statim niupela lesson, inap yu traim en? nau mi tu nogat taim long wokim lesson na mi winim skul dispela yia na mi pinisim olgeta samting olsem mi mas wokim long dispela mun.
sapos mi no inap statim niupela lesson, bai inap yu nap traim? nau mi tu nogat taim long wokim lesson na bai mi winim skul dispela yia olsem na mi mas wok long pisinim olgeta samting long dispela mun

My corrections may not be correct? But that are as how I've learned the language. They are as you would here it spoken on the streets of PNG.

As for continuing your lessons.. I myself am in the midst of a lifestyle change.. Going from working for 3 years to starting uni.. But I'd be glad to help out where ever I can with tutoring in tokpisin. Lol.. I may have to do some study myself :wink:

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Postby toksave » 2005-12-14, 4:57

clint, thank you very much, its those little details that i keep forgeting to add. i have noticed that tok pisin has a lot of combination of words to express something. as for this "olsem" word, is it treated as both "that" and "same"????

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Postby clint » 2005-12-14, 8:47

toksave wrote:clint, thank you very much, its those little details that i keep forgeting to add. i have noticed that tok pisin has a lot of combination of words to express something. as for this "olsem" word, is it treated as both "that" and "same"????
Erm.. Olsem.. It's a hard word to give a definite equivalent that portrays the same meaning..

In my opinion olsem is more like the words "are/like/that's why" depending on where it's used.

eg.

are... Olsem wanem? - Are how? or Are what? = How are you? What's up/happening? (You could put "Yu" at the beginning. but then this can alter the meaning if spoken in a more agressive tone. Enquiring what a person is up to because they may look suspicious. Similar to Yu wokim wanem? Which is literally What are you doing?)

like... Wokim kain olsem / wokim olsem kain. = Do it like this. (I'm not sure which tokpisin phrase in 2. is the 'correct' grammar but I have a feeling "wokim kain olsem" is the proper one.

I guess when "oslem" is put with "kain" together it can mean "same". As kain olsem means like this and if something else is like this then it must be similar or much the same.

kain comes from the english kind. but for some reason only means kind eg. when you say - this kind of thing. But can also mean "this" as I've mentioned earlier.

That's why... Olsem na em paitim mangi(non gender specific). = That's why he/she hit the kid/child. The two words "Olsem na" together is the equivalent of "That's why" in meaning only.

Does that clarify much?

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Postby toksave » 2005-12-24, 2:36

clint, thank you that was very helpful.
i was wondering if in verbs like "to go" and "to have" go and gat, do they also end with "-im" when followed by the object? and do they use "hevim" in tok pisin at all?

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Postby clint » 2006-01-03, 10:10

toksave wrote:clint, thank you that was very helpful.
i was wondering if in verbs like "to go" and "to have" go and gat, do they also end with "-im" when followed by the object? and do they use "hevim" in tok pisin at all?
Sorry went on a little xmas/new years week break.
-----------------
go and gat do not use "-im". you add "i" infront of them if anything..

but only used when referring to third persons
Are they going to the shops? - Bai ol igo long stoa?
Do they have enough money? - Ol igat inap moni?

*again this is not by the book. Just as I've learnt it.

Hevim is used but it's not a real word in tokpisin. It's slang from english.

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Re: papua new guinea's culture

Postby lainim tok pisin » 2011-07-28, 15:28

hey this is gutpla mi lainim tok pisin nau mi married naispla meri bilong PNG.She is not hia atm she back in png for while so tryin to polish up my tok pisin for her return tenkyu


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