Annou pratike kreyòl ayisyen! Let's Practice Haitian Creole

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Re: Let's Practice Haitian Creole!

Postby dasna » 2007-10-19, 16:28

Sisyphe wrote:
Mariam wrote:Yes, posting bilingually will help us a lot here.
I'll translate mine then.

Mesi Mirac, ak paou *site*, mwen ka aprann *more words*.
Thanks Mirac, with this website, I can learn more words.

Bonswa a tout moun, sac pase? Komon ou ye?
Good evening everyone, what's up? How are you doing?

Isit, tout moun pale *about* tout bagay *and* anyen.
Here, everybody talks about everything and nothing.




Actually, I was going to correct a few of the spellings, but researching these on the Internet, it seems that there is little standardization, so I don't really think that it is so safe to correct anymore. :shock: :? I'm so confused...
Anyway, mesi is mèsi (The pronunciation is slightly different- as in French). "sac pase' is 'sak pase'- 'sak pase' is extremely informal, so it is best to be aware of that. :wink: Also, she would write 'komon ou ye' as 'kouman ou ye'- there is a difference in pronunciation. I don't know if this has something to do with regions.
I am curious why you are all interested in Haïtian créole. Just casual curiosity? Do you have any Haïtian friends? Are you interested in the culture?
What questions do you have about Haïti, its people and culture? If you have any Haïtian freinds or if you were able to see and understand that documentary, the link of which I placed here, you would see that the Haïtian people is very proud - proud of our resilience and proud of our enthusiasm and perseverance amongst other things. Please let me know. :wink:



i one learn it because my man is from haiti and he is learn me kreyòl for real so if yall one help me out thnx

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Postby Sisyphe » 2007-10-19, 16:42

Byenvini chè nou desna! Tell me what you need. :)
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Re: Annou pratike kreyòl ayisyen! Let's Practice Haitian Creole

Postby ILuvEire » 2008-09-22, 10:23

How do you know when to use m and how to use mwen? Or w and ou?
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Re: Annou pratike kreyòl ayisyen! Let's Practice Haitian Creole

Postby Sisyphe » 2008-09-22, 18:21

Hi ILuvEire!
It's so good to see that you are learning Kreyol. :D Do you mind if I ask you why you are?
Generally, there are not clearcut rules (like everything else in Kreyol :lol:) about when to use m vs mwen, or ou vs w.
If you elide a pronoun (it doesn't matter if it's a subject or object pronoun) with a particle, then you should use the short form.
EG - M'ap pale'w.(I'm talking to you) Mwen ap pale ou sounds very funny to me.
Otherwise, the general principle that you should have in mind is that we don't really like consonant clusters other than the ones that naturally occur in French (and we change some of those too ;)).
So I would say Mwen se etidyan, (I am a student) and not M se etidyan.
Let me know if you have more questions. :)
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Re: Annou pratike kreyòl ayisyen! Let's Practice Haitian Creole

Postby ILuvEire » 2008-09-22, 22:59

Sisyphe wrote:Hi ILuvEire!
It's so good to see that you are learning Kreyol. :D Do you mind if I ask you why you are?

My girlfriend's family is Haitian. The language sounds so beautiful, so I started learning. I'm not sure how useful it is, but I don't really think about that stuff.

Generally, there are not clearcut rules (like everything else in Kreyol :lol:) about when to use m vs mwen, or ou vs w.
If you elide a pronoun (it doesn't matter if it's a subject or object pronoun) with a particle, then you should use the short form.
EG - M'ap pale'w.(I'm talking to you) Mwen ap pale ou sounds very funny to me.
Otherwise, the general principle that you should have in mind is that we don't really like consonant clusters other than the ones that naturally occur in French (and we change some of those too ;)).
So I would say Mwen se etidyan, (I am a student) and not M se etidyan.
Let me know if you have more questions. :)

Okay. That actually makes a lot of sense! It helps Kreyol flow. I'm going to keep learning the grammar, so I'll probably have some questions soon enough.

Is it true that Kreyol is based on Yoruba? I knew about the French, but I was wondering about the other sources. I like Yoruba. :)
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Re: Annou pratike kreyòl ayisyen! Let's Practice Haitian Creole

Postby Sisyphe » 2008-09-23, 7:43

ILuvEire wrote:My girlfriend's family is Haitian. The language sounds so beautiful, so I started learning. I'm not sure how useful it is, but I don't really think about that stuff.

Oh, that's wonderful. :D I hope you will continue to progress in the language.

ILuvEire wrote:Is it true that Kreyol is based on Yoruba? I knew about the French, but I was wondering about the other sources. I like Yoruba.


Yoruba hasn't substantially influenced the vocabulary of Creole, but the importance of Yoruba to the development of Haitian Creole cannot be underestimated. The grammar is very close to Yoruba, some of the particles that indicate tense actually come directly from Yoruba. A lot of our religious traditions and songs from the island involve the Yoruba language too. Other major languages that have influenced Haitian Creole are Fon, Ga and Ewe.
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Re: Annou pratike kreyòl ayisyen! Let's Practice Haitian Creole

Postby ILuvEire » 2008-09-24, 5:11

Sisyphe wrote:
ILuvEire wrote:My girlfriend's family is Haitian. The language sounds so beautiful, so I started learning. I'm not sure how useful it is, but I don't really think about that stuff.

Oh, that's wonderful. :D I hope you will continue to progress in the language.

I talk to her and her family all the time. Its not much more than "How's the dog" but it's something at least.

And I have convinced a couple of my friends to learn it with me. Because I started explaining some basic points of the grammar, they all found it very pretty and interesting. So here come more speakers! :)

Sisyphe wrote:
ILuvEire wrote:Is it true that Kreyol is based on Yoruba? I knew about the French, but I was wondering about the other sources. I like Yoruba.


Yoruba hasn't substantially influenced the vocabulary of Creole, but the importance of Yoruba to the development of Haitian Creole cannot be underestimated. The grammar is very close to Yoruba, some of the particles that indicate tense actually come directly from Yoruba. A lot of our religious traditions and songs from the island involve the Yoruba language too. Other major languages that have influenced Haitian Creole are Fon, Ga and Ewe.

That's very interesting. Voudou is an interesting religion. Is Catholoicism practiced there too, because my girlfriend's family is all Catholic. Well, maybe her Grandma might practice Voudou, although it's more Catholicism that is colored with Voudou.
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Re: Annou pratike kreyòl ayisyen! Let's Practice Haitian Creole

Postby Sisyphe » 2008-09-24, 6:29

You mean Vodou colored with Catholicism, right? ;) :lol: We always say Haïti is 80% Catholic but 100% Vodou. Catholicism is definitely very prevalent in Haïti and doesn't have the stigma Vodou has, so people are more open about practicing it. Personally, I am a Vodouisant myself amongst practicing other Afro-Caribbean traditions like Santeria.
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Re: Annou pratike kreyòl ayisyen! Let's Practice Haitian Creole

Postby ILuvEire » 2008-09-24, 13:17

Sisyphe wrote:You mean Vodou colored with Catholicism, right? ;) :lol: We always say Haïti is 80% Catholic but 100% Vodou. Catholicism is definitely very prevalent in Haïti and doesn't have the stigma Vodou has, so people are more open about practicing it. Personally, I am a Vodouisant myself amongst practicing other Afro-Caribbean traditions like Santeria.


Yes, that is what I meant. :) She is the only one from Haiti, and is very traditional.
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Re: Annou pratike kreyòl ayisyen! Let's Practice Haitian Creole

Postby Sisyphe » 2008-09-24, 19:48

Where in Haiti is she from?
BTW, do you want me to write to you in both languages for practice or just in English?
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Re: Annou pratike kreyòl ayisyen! Let's Practice Haitian Creole

Postby ILuvEire » 2008-09-24, 23:25

Sisyphe wrote:Where in Haiti is she from?
BTW, do you want me to write to you in both languages for practice or just in English?


I believe she is from Port-au-Prince. She was a school teacher when she lived there, and left in the '60s or '70s.

I'm really bad with vocabulary. So if you'd like to write in both you can.
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Re: Annou pratike kreyòl ayisyen! Let's Practice Haitian Creole

Postby Sisyphe » 2008-09-25, 7:43

Hmm...well I would be doing it to help you and not for myself...so I guess we can stick with English until you are ready.
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Re: Annou pratike kreyòl ayisyen! Let's Practice Haitian Creole

Postby kalemiye » 2008-10-10, 18:20

ıs voodoo really different from santeria?
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Re: Annou pratike kreyòl ayisyen! Let's Practice Haitian Creole

Postby Sisyphe » 2008-12-27, 21:46

Hey Renata, Today I was looking through the Haitian Creole forum, just making sure no messages fell through the cracks, and I noticed your message. So I will answer it, if you are still interested.

Vodou and Lukumi are very different, but very similar at the same time.
The major 'doctrinal' premises of the two religions are similar, these are a few of the more important ones:
1. God (called Bondyè in Vodou, and Oloddumare in Lukumi) created everything, but is beyond the comprehension of humanity and does not interact with us personally.
2. God has given humanity intermediary powers like angels (orishas in Lukumi, loas or lwè in Vodou) which are identified with natural forces, aspects of life, certain areas, colors and numbers to watch over us, as a whole and as individuals. Everyone, regardless of whether you practice the religion or not has up to 3 guardian orishas. [My primary guardian in Lukumi, for instance, is Ochun, who is the orisha of the rivers, of money, of the emotions, particularly love, and of sex. Her color is yellow and her number is 5. Children of Ochun (no, not literally) have similar traits as Ochun does.
3. Communicating with, respecting and honoring one's ancestors (eggun in Lukumi and zanset yo in Vodou) is important for their spiritual evolution and for our own wellbeing.
4. One can communicate with the orishas, loas and ancestors through possession, divination, etc.
5. The importance of sacrifice and offerings in exchange for something that the practitioner requests. This is seen, not as bribery, but as an interchange of ache (roughly - grace, power, it's also kind of like holy spirit).

Other than that, the two religions diverge significantly. But this shouldn't be surprising - the religions were practiced in different tribes in Africa (what emerged as Vodou by the Ga, Ewe and Fon peoples, and Lukumi by the Yoruba) and in different countries in the New World (the religions interact with different Native American religions as well, which has a different effect on both religions).
First of all, the orishas and loas are different. Ochun in Lukumi and Ezili Freda in Vodou are similar in what they are identified with, but they are not the same, and would greatly resent being treated as such. In traditional Yoruba belief, there are the orishas, forces of good, and the ajoguns, forces of bad, which were both worked with. The orishas, for the goodness of God, and the ajoguns, to leave people alone and not hurt them. In Cuban Lukumi, only the orishas are worked with. In Vodou, there are different categories also. The Rada spirits have been adored since Vodun was practiced in Africa, and are generally more good-natured and calm, while the Petwo spirits are often those of people who died in slave ships going to the new world or in the new world in the bonds of slavery. They are often much more aggressive, and even frightening at times. There are also Congo spirits, whose behavior is between those of the Rada and Petwo rites.
They are also ceremonially and structurally different. Lukumi has several complicated forms of divination, such as diloggun (the cowrie shells), throwing obi (coconut) and opwele (which is used by babalawos [high priests of Lukumi]), while Vodou doesn't have one divination system that is unique to it - Vodouisants often use tarot cards and things like that. The drumming beats for the spirits are different, and the songs are as well. So is the language - Lukumi songs are in Yoruba and Vodou songs in Haitian Creole. Also, in Lukumi, only priests (santeros) and those who the orishas think are ready to become santeros are possessed, and only by their primary orisha. In Vodou, any lwè can possess you...if they choose, of course. The initiations are also different...In Lukumi, you first receive the elekes of the 5 main orishas, which protect you from harm, then the guererros, which are Eleggua, Oggun, Osun and Ochosi, if you want to look them up, and then you receive kariocha and become a priest of your orisha. In Vodou, there are 3 levels of priesthood but no real initiations other than that. In both religions, you don't have to be a priest to participate though. Those are some of the differences, and there are many more.
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Re: Annou pratike kreyòl ayisyen! Let's Practice Haitian Creole

Postby daniellle » 2009-10-01, 23:40

:hmm: very interesting, thank you :yep:
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Re: Annou pratike kreyòl ayisyen! Let's Practice Haitian Creole

Postby DemonInside » 2013-10-26, 10:55

Hello everyone!

My name is Dmitry and i need a help with Kreyol song, which record i have.

here is the link:
http://pleer.com/tracks/7173284kBJw

Hope that someone can define some words from text, or artist, or name of song...
It will be great even a text, because i have no point to search now... My last hope is that Kreyol forum..


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