Links for learning Celtic Languages

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Links for learning Celtic Languages

Postby Ciarán12 » 2012-09-15, 1:18

I was originally just going to make this for Irish, but I thought that might be a bit rude now that we're all sharing a forum, so I'll put up links for Irish and if anyone posts links to other Celtic language learning sites I'll copy them to this first post.

Irish

I think this first one is particularly good. It's a very in-depth course that's very heavy on grammar. Excellent for proper language nerds.

http://nualeargais.ie/gnag/gram.htm

A text-to-speech voice synthesiser for Irish (Gaoth Dobhair (Ulster) Dialect and Conamara (Connacht) Dialect pronunciations)

http://www.abair.tcd.ie/

Here are others I found on a Google search...

http://www.maths.tcd.ie/gaeilge/

http://talkirish.com/

http://www.rte.ie/easyirish/

http://www.rte.ie/tv/turasteanga/learning_irish.html

http://www.gaeltalk.net/why_learn.html

http://www.athbui.com/36%20Indo%20Nasc.htm

http://www.digitaldialects.com/Irish.htm


http://www.focloir.ie/ (a newly created online dictionary with some very thorough entries. Currently only 30% of its planned content is available, but through installments throughout the next two years it will be fully updated)

http://www.focal.ie (terminological dictionary)

http://www.uni-due.de/DI/index.html (Excellent, very informative and accessible layout)

http://glg.csisdmz.ul.ie/index.php?find=Irish - Irish Dictionary site. The website layout is pretty awful, but there a lot of headwords, and the information is pretty good if you can look past the aesthetics.

Scottish Gaelic

Courtesy of nighean-neonach (taken from the "[Scottish Gaelic] Useful links for beginning learners" thread):

nighean-neonach wrote:http://taic.me.uk/taic.htm - This is quite a comprehensive online course, rather traditional and grammar based in its approach, and with sound files for all the words and sentences. It is provided by a native Gaelic speaker, as far as I know.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/scotland/alba/fogh ... ndex.shtml - This is another online course, provided by the Gaelic BBC. Compared to TAIC it presents more of a conversational approach, with lots of useful everyday dialogues, including sound files as well.

These two online courses will give you a good start, whether you just want to get a first impression of the language, or whether you can't afford any textbooks yet.

Try out the rest of the BBC site as well. Click on "Èist beò" in the upper right hand corner to get to the online radio programme.

For in-depth information on Gaelic phonology see here http://www.akerbeltz.org/ - this site is a real treasure trove, with very detailed explanations and lots of sound files for all the of the Gaelic language. The site is maintained by a German linguist with expert knowledge on Gaelic.

If you want to get in contact with the Gaelic (learners') online community, have a look at this site: http://www.tirnamblog.com/ - there are lot of people writing blogs in Gaelic, but be careful, lots of them are learners, even mere beginners, so you will see loads of incorrect Gaelic in those blogs ;)
There used to be a nice international Gaelic forum on the web as well, but it's been down for a while.

If you need an online dictionary, the best one is http://smo.uhi.ac.uk/gaidhlig/faclair/sbg/lorg.php - but one of the biggest mistakes you can make as a beginner is typing some stuff in there and translating your ideas word by word into Gaelic. Do try and learn some basics first, and make sure you know a bit about Gaelic sentence structures and some fundamental rules like initial sound mutations, etc.

In case you have any questions, feel free to ask here on the forum.


eurabol wrote:lower-level learners posting (and getting help, I note), so good for beginners and those who lack confidence, though not only these:

http://www.foramnagaidhlig.net/

There is also a fairly active-looking German board which has a Gaelic-only section:

http://www.schottisch-gaelisch.de/phpBB2/




ffrench wrote:I thought I had found http://learngaelic.net/ on UniLang, but it certainly deserves a place on the list. The videos help a lot with pronunciation and the setups are cute to watch and all.


ceid donn wrote:I thought I would add some things here for Gàidhlig:

For new learners, An Gàradh aig Sìne is a nicely done English-Gàidhlig animated online e-book that is a good way to learn and re-inforce those first bits of Gàidhlig.

Akerbeltz has moved to a new wiki-style site. Pretty much everything that was on the old site is up there now. There's also info and links for LibreOffice, Firefox. Skype and other software in Gàidhlig in the iGàidhlig section.

I highly recommend any committed learner of Gàidhlig to buy akerbeltz/Michael Bauer's book Blas na Gàidhlig about Gàidhlig pronunciation, and you can get the free, downloadable supplemental materials for the book, including audio files and pronunciation guides, here.

Guthan nan Eilean is a superb set of series of free videos, with both wordlinked texts and downloadable Word docs, about the communities of the Western Isles, created for learners of Gaelic and English.

An Sgeulachd Ghoirid is a site that has short stories in Gàidhlig available both in audio and text. Great resource since most of these stories are long out of print. Additionally they have videos of Gàidhlig speakers talking about the stories for extra listening practice.

Stòrlann Nàiseanta na Gàidhlig has three e-books available for free download--Mar a Chuala Mise e, Fo Bhruid, and Ailig Aurora. I've read Ailig Aurora and it's incomplete, but it's still a worthwhile resource. My study partner and I are currently reading Fo Bhruid. Additonally they have chapter-by-chapter audio recordings of Fo Bhruid, which is the more advanced of the three books and is a modernized retelling of Robert Louis Stevenson's Kidnapped.

Another online dictionary: Am Faclair Beag is what the earlier Dwelly-D (Electronic Dwelly's) has evolved into--it's all the Dwelly's entries plus additions.

An Seotal is a terminology database. It's a work in progress, and additions are always being made, but a lot of technical words that aren't found in regular dictionaries can be found there. it's mostly aimed at topics that pertain to secondary (high school) level education, so to promote Gàidhlig-medium education in Scotland, but it's useful for learners too.

And lastly, an old archive of Colin Mark's Gaelic Tip of the Week.

For Gàidhlig, Gaeilg and Gaelg, akerbeltz's Michael Bauer came out with a children's picture book that can be purchased through Amazon.uk. On his website he has free audio readings plus a word list for each version:

Rònan is Ciorstag air a’ chroit (Gàidhlig)
Rónán agus Caoimhe ar an fheirm (Gaeilge)
Ronan as Kirree er y chroit (Gaelg)



Manx

Just a few links for Manx here that I found with a basic Google search:

http://www.learnmanx.com/

http://www.learnmanx.com/cms/audio_coll_index_3293.html

http://www.mannin.info/Mannin/fockleyr/m2e.php (this is an amazing resource!)

http://lughtynsagh.blogspot.com.es/

Also, for iPod/iPod Touch/iPad users, there's a free app called "Learn Manx" that is a really well put together app.


Welsh

Courtesy of YngNghymru (taken from the "[Welsh] Edau adnoddau/Resources thread"):

YngNghymru wrote:
UniLang resources

The Unilang Basic Course (I'm such a self-promoting loser)

Conjugation of 'bod'

Conjugation of regular and irregular verbs

Courses etc

First and foremost:

Say Something in Welsh - This site is excellent, particularly if you're not someone who learns languages through visual methods. Although you won't learn how to write for a while, this course allows you to achieve oral ability really quickly. However, by using this link to get there, you sign an agreement that you'll still come back to UniLang. :P

the BBC site includes a dictionary, a reasonably solid basic grammar reference, a decent mutation checker and lots of games and other resources.

An online Welsh course, which is basic but will teach you comprehensive basic skills.

Dictionaries

The dictionary from said course

Y Geiriadur, my dictionary of choice :P

The BBC dictionary, as mentioned before.


eryrwyn wrote:
Geiriadur yr Academi (Yn anffodus, dim ond Saesneg-Cymraeg)


Cornish

Courtesy of morlader (taken from "[Cornish] Asnodhow rag studhyoryon / Resources for students")

morlader wrote:Websites


Online courses


Social media


Online resources


Books available worldwide

Course books:
Reading material:
Dictionaries:
Online shop:


Ceid donn wrote:Three Beatrix Potter books in Cornish, free .pdfs (need to create a Lulu account to download):
http://www.lulu.com/shop/search.ep?cont ... Id=1088061


atalarikt wrote:Another site to learn Cornish language: http://www.learncornishnow.com/



Breton

http://www.loecsen.com/travel/0-en-14-2-9-free-lessons-bretone.html

http://icdbl.org/saozg/learn.php (specifically for people who don't speak French)

http://www.kervarker.org/

http://www.thecbj.com/breton/Breton_lesson1.html

http://brezhoneg.org.uk/deloof/ (a very good online dictionary...but it's Dutch-Breton-Dutch! So, if you don't speak Dutch, you can translate the Dutch entries with this dictionary: http://nlen.dict.cc/ (on the up side, you might learn some Dutch by doing this as well :) ))
Beidh Gaeilge líofa chruinn bhlasta agam nó go bhfaighe mé bás san iarracht!

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Re: Links for learning Celtic Languages

Postby ceid donn » 2013-02-21, 2:02

I thought I would add some things here for Gàidhlig:

For new learners, An Gàradh aig Sìne is a nicely done English-Gàidhlig animated online e-book that is a good way to learn and re-inforce those first bits of Gàidhlig.

Akerbeltz has moved to a new wiki-style site. Pretty much everything that was on the old site is up there now. There's also info and links for LibreOffice, Firefox. Skype and other software in Gàidhlig in the iGàidhlig section.

I highly recommend any committed learner of Gàidhlig to buy akerbeltz/Michael Bauer's book Blas na Gàidhlig about Gàidhlig pronunciation, and you can get the free, downloadable supplemental materials for the book, including audio files and pronunciation guides, here.

Guthan nan Eilean is a superb set of series of free videos, with both wordlinked texts and downloadable Word docs, about the communities of the Western Isles, created for learners of Gaelic and English.

An Sgeulachd Ghoirid is a site that has short stories in Gàidhlig available both in audio and text. Great resource since most of these stories are long out of print. Additionally they have videos of Gàidhlig speakers talking about the stories for extra listening practice.

Stòrlann Nàiseanta na Gàidhlig has three e-books available for free download--Mar a Chuala Mise e, Fo Bhruid, and Ailig Aurora. I've read Ailig Aurora and it's incomplete, but it's still a worthwhile resource. My study partner and I are currently reading Fo Bhruid. Additonally they have chapter-by-chapter audio recordings of Fo Bhruid, which is the more advanced of the three books and is a modernized retelling of Robert Louis Stevenson's Kidnapped.

Another online dictionary: Am Faclair Beag is what the earlier Dwelly-D (Electronic Dwelly's) has evolved into--it's all the Dwelly's entries plus additions.

An Seotal is a terminology database. It's a work in progress, and additions are always being made, but a lot of technical words that aren't found in regular dictionaries can be found there. it's mostly aimed at topics that pertain to secondary (high school) level education, so to promote Gàidhlig-medium education in Scotland, but it's useful for learners too.

And lastly, an old archive of Colin Mark's Gaelic Tip of the Week.

For Gàidhlig, Gaeilg and Gaelg, akerbeltz's Michael Bauer came out with a children's picture book that can be purchased through Amazon.uk. On his website he has free audio readings plus a word list for each version:

Rònan is Ciorstag air a’ chroit (Gàidhlig)
Rónán agus Caoimhe ar an fheirm (Gaeilge)
Ronan as Kirree er y chroit (Gaelg)

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Re: Links for learning Celtic Languages

Postby Ciarán12 » 2013-02-21, 12:24

Thanks! I added your links to the first post, and I added some for Manx and Breton, as well as a few more for Irish.
Beidh Gaeilge líofa chruinn bhlasta agam nó go bhfaighe mé bás san iarracht!

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Re: Links for learning Celtic Languages

Postby księżycowy » 2013-02-21, 12:34

The link to the Scottish Gaelic TAIC course "submitted" by nighean-neonac is down. Here is the new link:
http://taic.me.uk/taic.htm

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Re: Links for learning Celtic Languages

Postby Ciarán12 » 2013-02-21, 16:21

księżycowy wrote:The link to the Scottish Gaelic TAIC course "submitted" by nighean-neonac is down. Here is the new link:
http://taic.me.uk/taic.htm


Corrected. Thanks.
Beidh Gaeilge líofa chruinn bhlasta agam nó go bhfaighe mé bás san iarracht!

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Re: Links for learning Celtic Languages

Postby Lur » 2013-03-16, 1:07

ceid donn wrote:Akerbeltz has moved to a new wiki-style site. Pretty much everything that was on the old site is up there now. There's also info and links for LibreOffice, Firefox. Skype and other software in Gàidhlig in the iGàidhlig section.

I was instantly wondering why the site has a Basque name.

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Re: Links for learning Celtic Languages

Postby ceid donn » 2013-03-16, 2:04

Akerbeltz is Michael Bauer--in Gàidhlig circles, Michael's sort of our Gàidhlig linguistics guru and he's an actual degreed linguist (Edinburgh Uni) who specializes in the Goidelic languages, to our great fortune. Wherever you see "akerbeltz" in Gàidhlig, Gaeilge or Gaelg stuff online, it's him. Here'sthe story from his publishing site:

Oh and yes, Akerbeltz is not a Gaelic word. It's Basque actually and means "the black goat", the name of an old Basque deity, the protector of the land and the beasts. When the head of Akerbeltz began to use the name, he used it mainly on internet chatrooms since there were way too many Michaels around usually. But somehow the name stuck, even outside the chatrooms and when a name was needed for the resource site, Akerbeltz was the first that sprang to mind. By now, it's so established as a brand name that it would be hard to change. Mystical are the ways of the web indeed!

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Re: Links for learning Celtic Languages

Postby Lur » 2013-03-16, 15:55

Aha. I just recognized the roots and I didn't get it :lol:

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Re: Links for learning Celtic Languages

Postby ceid donn » 2013-09-21, 17:46

 (kw) New Cornish-English online dictionary, done by MAGA, the Cornish Language Partnership:

http://www.cornishdictionary.org.uk/
Last edited by ceid donn on 2013-11-12, 19:27, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Links for learning Celtic Languages

Postby ceid donn » 2013-11-07, 1:57

Alluns was asking about other correspondence courses besides KDL for Cornish, namely for Irish or Gaelic, so you know any please post links.

I do know of a correspondence course for  (br) Breton: Skol Ober

They also have a little bit of grammar too. Many of the books they have listed I have not been able to find (especially beyond the beginner level--they're OOP and used copies are just not anywhere or way overpriced) or only available in France, so getting one of the books for this course might be challenging for some people.
Last edited by ceid donn on 2013-11-12, 19:28, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Links for learning Celtic Languages

Postby ceid donn » 2013-11-12, 19:25

A few more things:

 (br) There is a new magazine aimed at A2-B2 Brezhoneg learners and I just purchased a subscription: #brezhoneg. I'm praying they will deliver to the US--if they don't I will update with that info.

 (gv) There is a new learners video series in the making for 2014 from Island of Culture that I'm looking forward to--they have a couple short previews up already: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t-bRIcWc-MY&feature=c4-overview&list=UUV0Z7iLQCvQKCW6VcWHM5oA

Adrian Cain, who's a Gaelg teacher (learnmanx.com) and is involved with the making of these videos, is on Twitter and if you have any interest in learning Gealg you should follow him: @greinneyder

 (kw) i just found out about this bilingual Cornish-English novel available through Amazon: The Cult of Relics: Devocyon dhe Greryow

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Re: Links for learning Celtic Languages

Postby ceid donn » 2013-12-24, 1:38

ceid donn wrote: (br) There is a new magazine aimed at A2-B2 Brezhoneg learners and I just purchased a subscription: #brezhoneg. I'm praying they will deliver to the US--if they don't I will update with that info.



As I posted in my WAC thread, the premier issue of #brezhoneg arrived Saturday and I'm thrilled:

Image

It's very nice, although it did take a month to get here (the postmark is Nov 18, just days after I paid for it). It has comic strips, interviews & articles with vocabulary lists, bits on grammar, and a quiz. Everything is marked A1, A2, B1 or B2 so you know how difficult it will be, and easier stuff cmes with French parallel texts (no English). It's only about 23 pgs but it's crammed with stuff. Next issue, the March/April one, is due out in early March. I can say for ~US$40 for 6 issues that I'd recommend it (assuming future issues will be of the same quality), especially since learning materials outside of France for anything past A1 level are so hard to come by.

 (gd)

In a related note, Cothrom, the last remaining (IIRC) Gàidhlig learners' magazine still in circulation, is ending. I've never seen a copy myself, because getting anything from Scotland when you're in the US is so expensive and iffy. But it's unfortuante that there's one less resource out there and also because they had just launched an audio component with the issues. Something with funding problems, I suspect. As with everything Gàidhlig. :roll:

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Re: Links for learning Celtic Languages

Postby ceid donn » 2014-01-06, 15:45

 (gv)

It's a pity there's not more interest in Gaelg around here because they're doing a celebration of Manx culutre on the Isle of Man for 2014, which will include various resources for learning some Gaelg. Here's one thing that I'm participating in:

LearnManx.com's 1000 Words of Manx Challenge

I was able to download the MP3s by right-clicking on the play-back widget and then clicking on "Save audio as..." (in Chrome).

 (gd)

Naidheachd math airson luchd-ionnsachaidh:

A batch of e-books from Acair are now available on Amazon.co.uk and Amazon.com (not sure about other Amazon sites). One is in English (by a Gaelic speaker), 3 are bilingual and 1 is in Gàidhlig:

Image

Hopefully more will come, agus tuilleadh anns a' Ghàidhlig a-mhàin! :D

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Re: Links for learning Celtic Languages

Postby Ciarán12 » 2014-01-26, 13:25

Found a gold mine of Irish resources here: http://www.asnc.cam.ac.uk/currentstudents/irish/resources.htm
Beidh Gaeilge líofa chruinn bhlasta agam nó go bhfaighe mé bás san iarracht!

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Re: Links for learning Celtic Languages

Postby ceid donn » 2014-01-26, 23:24

 (gd) Memrise vocabulary lessons for Tim Armstrong's Air Cuan Dubh Drilseach.

Don't know if this would interest anyone here, but someone went to the trouble of making these. Pretty cool of them. :)

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Re: Links for learning Celtic Languages

Postby ceid donn » 2014-03-09, 1:41

 (gd) A new online magazine completely in Gàidhlig, covering various subjects. Looks ambitious:

Dàna

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Re: Links for learning Celtic Languages

Postby BrianJ » 2014-08-11, 5:33

Gaeilge:

As a beginner, I have found the phrase of the day (Frása an Lae) playlist on this YouTube channel to be helpful.

https://www.youtube.com/user/Gaelchultur

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Re: Links for learning Celtic Languages

Postby sigmundv » 2014-09-02, 20:06

Ciarán12 wrote:Found a gold mine of Irish resources here: http://www.asnc.cam.ac.uk/currentstudents/irish/resources.htm

Wow, good find! Looks comprehensive!

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Re: Links for learning Celtic Languages

Postby atalarikt » 2014-10-05, 11:43

Another site to learn Cornish language: http://www.learncornishnow.com/
Jika saya ada salah, mohon diperbaiki. If I am wrong, please correct me.
(Native language)~Indonesian (id) (Fluent second languages)~English (en-US) Javanese (jv) (Understanding)~ Malaysian (ms) Arabic (ar) Dutch (nl) Spanish (es)(Learning/wanting to learn)~Balinese (ban) Russian (ru) Danish (dk) Icelandic (is) Italian (it) Brazilian Portuguese (pt-BR) Irish (ir) Esperanto (eo) Novial (art-nov) Lingua Franca Nova (art-lfn) Volapük (art-vo) Toki Pona (art-tkp) These languages in the "Learning/wanting to learn" section are just a few of them ;)

Swienegel

Re: Links for learning Celtic Languages

Postby Swienegel » 2014-12-01, 19:25

Even if there are a few files that don't work anymore because noone takes care of the site anymore: I really like the BBC Welsh audio course "Catchphrase": http://www.bbc.co.uk/wales/catchphrase/ ... ons1.shtml
It starts from the very beginning and, unlike many other online resources, follows a common thread. Each lesson is a very small step and you've got the audio and a transcript, so you can easily do one lesson a day. I like it a lot, because I'm an extremely auditive learning type and for me it's great to hear the vocabulary and conversations, I can even remember some of the explanations of the grammar better when I listened to them while reading the transcript.


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