[Scottish Gaelic] Translation requests

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Eoghan
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Re: Translation

Postby Eoghan » 2011-04-23, 23:47

TheodoreLaVilotte wrote:Halò,
My name is Theodore, in French Théodore, from the Perigord, and I would like translate in Gaildig, Scottish Gaelic the expression :

A seed of Perigord
Lost in the scottish blue mist
From a happy thistle, just nearby lochaber
Sprouted a grapevine.

Thank you all.


Sìol an Perigòrd
gun fhaotainn anns a’ cheò ghorm na h-Alba
Bha crann-fìona a’ craobhadh
ò‘n cluaran àghmhòr, faisg air Loch Abar
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Albeit the Scot in me is of the Western stock and the red of the Cairngorms, the heather and the Lewissian gneiss, the Viking in me was there when you uttered the first word of your leid.

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Can someone please help with my translation

Postby pangy » 2011-05-04, 8:44

Hi

I am a jewellery maker from the Channel Islands and have had a request from a customer to make a piece of jewellery for his mother with a Scottish gaelic message engraved on.

If anyone can help me I am looking for the following translations

Circle of life
Mother

If anyone can help me that would be very much appreciated

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Eoghan
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Re: Can someone please help with my translation

Postby Eoghan » 2011-05-05, 2:24

If s/he's willing to pay for the piece of jewellery, s/he is willing to pay for an authorised translation as well.

I try to help, but as soon as I give an answer to any of these translation requests, the person that asked the question in the first place just leaves, without even having the courtesy of saying thank you.

What you're looking for is a) cearcall a’ bheatha, which is a very un-Gaelic phrase, I'd rather say "roth mòr an t-saoghal", i.e. the big wheel of life.

the second one, i.e. mother would be "màthair".

A dathnaid is a foster-mother, ìog is an evil mother, and brinneach is an incredibly old mother. Then there's naing as well, i.e. an obsolete dialectal word for mother.
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Albeit the Scot in me is of the Western stock and the red of the Cairngorms, the heather and the Lewissian gneiss, the Viking in me was there when you uttered the first word of your leid.

pangy
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Re: Can someone please help with my translation

Postby pangy » 2011-05-07, 14:03

Eoghan wrote:If s/he's willing to pay for the piece of jewellery, s/he is willing to pay for an authorised translation as well.

I try to help, but as soon as I give an answer to any of these translation requests, the person that asked the question in the first place just leaves, without even having the courtesy of saying thank you.

What you're looking for is a) cearcall a’ bheatha, which is a very un-Gaelic phrase, I'd rather say "roth mòr an t-saoghal", i.e. the big wheel of life.

the second one, i.e. mother would be "màthair".

A dathnaid is a foster-mother, ìog is an evil mother, and brinneach is an incredibly old mother. Then there's naing as well, i.e. an obsolete dialectal word for mother.



Thank you very much Eoghan,your help is very much appreciated.

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Re: Can someone please help with my translation

Postby Stuart » 2011-05-23, 13:23

Hello Eoghan / Unilang board members,

I, similarly, am looking for assistance with a Scottish Gaelic translation. It is part of a gift as my grandfather passed away and I'd like to have something engraved which would mean something to his closest.

Would anyone be able to translate any of the following ideas I had?
- Gone but not forgotten
- Freedom Fighter (reason being he fought bravely in WWII)
- Forever in our minds
- Dignified, to the last

I'm also open to suggestions, if anyone is inclined.

I understand it must be frustrating to have people ask one question then disappear from the forum; I would be most grateful for any help you can offer and if there's professional translation services out there then I'm happy to commission help. Additionally, this has kindled an interest in the language - it's a shame they don't teach it in the schools in the south of Scotland.

Cheers, Stuart

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Re: Can someone please help with my translation

Postby Eoghan » 2011-05-23, 15:16

Stuart wrote:Hello Eoghan / Unilang board members,

I, similarly, am looking for assistance with a Scottish Gaelic translation. It is part of a gift as my grandfather passed away and I'd like to have something engraved which would mean something to his closest.

Would anyone be able to translate any of the following ideas I had?
- Gone but not forgotten
- Freedom Fighter (reason being he fought bravely in WWII)
- Forever in our minds
- Dignified, to the last

I'm also open to suggestions, if anyone is inclined.

I understand it must be frustrating to have people ask one question then disappear from the forum; I would be most grateful for any help you can offer and if there's professional translation services out there then I'm happy to commission help. Additionally, this has kindled an interest in the language - it's a shame they don't teach it in the schools in the south of Scotland.

Cheers, Stuart


Is it okay if I give you some translations that are more idiomatic as far as the Gaelic goes, than the things you listed here, but that still mean the same thing?

- Gone but not forgotten - Ged a dh'fhalbh e air slighe na fìrinn, cha dearmad sinn e (though he is walking on the road of truth, we have not forgotten him)

- Freedom Fighter (reason being he fought bravely in WWII) - Ceud-chathach na Saorsa (A man who fought with the power of 100 men for the freedom of others)

- Forever in our minds - Bidh tastan againn air gu bràth - (We will always remember him)

- Dignified, to the last - Duine fiachail a bh'ann, gus an deireadh a bheatha - (He was a dignified man to the very end of his life)
Image (sv)  (en)  (gd)  (de) (ga)  (fr)  (pt)  (nl)  (it)  (no-nn)  (fo)

Albeit the Scot in me is of the Western stock and the red of the Cairngorms, the heather and the Lewissian gneiss, the Viking in me was there when you uttered the first word of your leid.

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Re: Can someone please help with my translation

Postby Stuart » 2011-05-23, 15:58

Eoghan wrote:Is it okay if I give you some translations that are more idiomatic as far as the Gaelic goes, than the things you listed here, but that still mean the same thing?

- Gone but not forgotten - Ged a dh'fhalbh e air slighe na fìrinn, cha dearmad sinn e (though he is walking on the road of truth, we have not forgotten him)

- Freedom Fighter (reason being he fought bravely in WWII) - Ceud-chathach na Saorsa (A man who fought with the power of 100 men for the freedom of others)

- Forever in our minds - Bidh tastan againn air gu bràth - (We will always remember him)

- Dignified, to the last - Duine fiachail a bh'ann, gus an deireadh a bheatha - (He was a dignified man to the very end of his life)

Many thanks Eoghan for the swift response - your examples are exactly what I was looking for, as I'm aware that a translation of this kind is more than just word for word.

Plenty choice - I'll have a think on these and keep you posted.

Thanks again, Stuart

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Re: Can someone please help with my translation

Postby Eoghan » 2011-05-23, 15:59

Stuart wrote:Many thanks Eoghan for the swift response - your examples are exactly what I was looking for, as I'm aware that a translation of this kind is more than just word for word.

Plenty choice - I'll have a think on these and keep you posted.

Thanks again, Stuart


You're welcome!
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Albeit the Scot in me is of the Western stock and the red of the Cairngorms, the heather and the Lewissian gneiss, the Viking in me was there when you uttered the first word of your leid.

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Please Help Translating

Postby gainey » 2011-05-26, 15:20

I know this probably won't translate directly, but I'd love to know what the translation is:

Through the pain of loss we learn about/to love

If someone could help me I would appreciate it. I have just begun looking more into my heritage and want to learn alot about Scottish Gaelic and eventually travel to Scotland.

Thank you - Todd

Laderak
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Need help with a Scottish Gaelic translation

Postby Laderak » 2011-05-30, 6:36

Hello,
I would like to translate "Be yourself" into Scottish Gaelic


in the context of;
define yourself
be who you want to be



Thank you!

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Firefighter Translation

Postby Incendia Proeliator » 2011-06-01, 5:25

Hey all, I am getting a very large tattoo done but would like the wording to be in Scottish Gaelic in honor of my familys heritage. If someone out there could please help translate these phrases that would be great.

1/ Everyone Comes Home
2/ Brothers Above All
3/ Two In, Two Out
4/ Bless My Children And My Mate
5/ Honor
6/ Valor
7/ Dedication
8/ Service

I know that seems a lot, but it is a big tattoo and I would really appreciate any help I can get.
And if according to our fate,
I have to lose my life,
Please bless with your protecting hand,
My children and my mate.

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Naming a Cottage

Postby Lambkin*2008 » 2011-06-13, 11:19

Would someone be able to help with a Gaelic name for a wee retirement cottage for my Mother? More importantly, the pronounciation of said name! Along the lines of "Cottage in the Trees" or "little Groan" (Groan Farm is where she is retiring from!) The cottage is called Bonnyview at present and a translation of that might just be dandy! Many thanks in anticipation of any advice offered!

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Re: Naming a Cottage

Postby Gaelg » 2011-06-13, 16:10

Hello, I don't normally do translation requests, and what I'm giving you below, isn't necessarily correct, as I am a learner. I suggest maybe waiting for someone better to answer if they are willing.

Cottage in the trees - Taigh-còmhnaidh beag anns na craobhan.
Little Groan - Groan Beag. (beag -> similar to "bech")Ch is same as ch in loch.
Bonnyview doesn't appear to have a Gaelic translation and a literal one might not be good.

I suggest this websit -> http://www.nocandhu.com/page17.htm

It supplies many traditional Gaelic names for houses, and one in there might be better suited. I can't provide pronunciation as I don't know IPA and many gaelic sounds don't exist in english.

:)

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Re: Naming a Cottage

Postby Lambkin*2008 » 2011-06-13, 17:50

Hi there
Thank you so much for coming back and for your suggestions. I have read through many threads today and note requests for translations are not always appreciated - often because those requesting a translation are thoughtless and don't appreciate the help or information offered.
I will hop onto your suggested website as "Cottage in the trees" is a fair mouthful and would need a huge envelope to accommodate :D .
Once again, many thanks for taking the trouble to read and time to reply to me.
Regards
Eileen

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Re: Naming a Cottage

Postby linguoboy » 2011-06-13, 18:04

Gaelg wrote:Cottage in the trees - Taigh-còmhnaidh beag anns na craobhan.

"Little dwelling house" is quite a mouthful, and not a particularly close translation of "cottage", I wouldn't think. Both and its diminutives bothan and bothag would seem like the obvious choices, cot or crò might work as well.
"Richmond is a real scholar; Owen just learns languages because he can't bear not to know what other people are saying."--Margaret Lattimore on her two sons

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Re: Naming a Cottage

Postby Lambkin*2008 » 2011-06-13, 19:14

Hi and thanks for your reply!
Am I correct in thinking "Bothan anns na craobhan" or "Cot anns na craobhan" is what you are meaning?
I think I have to keep looking for something which "hits me" so to speak - and that may involve a complete break with any link to the Farm, and perhaps an unrelated name/fresh start!
Thank you again for taking the time to post on this thread - it is very much appreciated!
Kind regards
Eileen

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Re: Naming a Cottage

Postby linguoboy » 2011-06-13, 20:02

Lambkin*2008 wrote:Hi and thanks for your reply!
Am I correct in thinking "Bothan anns na craobhan" or "Cot anns na craobhan" is what you are meaning?

Indeed.

Lambkin*2008 wrote:I think I have to keep looking for something which "hits me" so to speak - and that may involve a complete break with any link to the Farm, and perhaps an unrelated name/fresh start!

That's the way it is with names. One thing you could do is search English terms in this online dictionary and see if you are grabbed by any of the equivalents which pop up. Then post them here and we can see about assembling these elements into a grammatically correct whole.
"Richmond is a real scholar; Owen just learns languages because he can't bear not to know what other people are saying."--Margaret Lattimore on her two sons

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Re: Naming a Cottage

Postby Lambkin*2008 » 2011-06-13, 21:17

Thank you - I am using your link also.
Choices, choices! One would assume such a task to be relatively straight forward but....... :nope:
As you suggested, I will bring some ideas back to this thread as soon as I can and would welcome all comments (even the negative ones :? )
Many thanks to you both..... I hope we can "speak" again soon.

Regards
Eileen

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Re: Naming a Cottage

Postby ceid donn » 2011-06-13, 23:07

linguoboy wrote:
Lambkin*2008 wrote:Hi and thanks for your reply!
Am I correct in thinking "Bothan anns na craobhan" or "Cot anns na craobhan" is what you are meaning?

Indeed.

Lambkin*2008 wrote:I think I have to keep looking for something which "hits me" so to speak - and that may involve a complete break with any link to the Farm, and perhaps an unrelated name/fresh start!

That's the way it is with names. One thing you could do is search English terms in this online dictionary and see if you are grabbed by any of the equivalents which pop up. Then post them here and we can see about assembling these elements into a grammatically correct whole.


Dwelly's is still the standard for Gaelic dictionaries, but it is also very old and contains many words that most Gaelic speakers today do not use.

But then again, the OP is looking for a kitschy token name, not something that would actually be relevant and meaningful to Gaelic speakers or even something that would reflect any Gaelic heritage this property may have had. :roll:

That said, "bothan" is the usual word used for buildings that are referred to as a "cottage" in English. Beyond that, I would recommend the OP seek out a professional translator, as this is something relatively "official." It should be worth a small fee to get it right. If it's not, then the OP's better off sticking with an English name.

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Re: Naming a Cottage

Postby Gaelg » 2011-06-14, 0:11

Taigh-còmhnaidh is a word for cottage tho, despite it being a mouthful :) My dictionary gave me no other word :( fail.


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