[Scottish Gaelic] Translation requests

Koko
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Re: [Scottish Gaelic] Translation requests

Postby Koko » 2015-08-08, 6:55

linguoboy wrote:No, because you've left out the subject.

I thought that as long as it's understand who the subject is you needn't say so long it be a pronoun. Unless this is only possible when the subject's been stated already (or informally)??

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linguoboy
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Re: [Scottish Gaelic] Translation requests

Postby linguoboy » 2015-08-08, 16:59

Koko wrote:
linguoboy wrote:No, because you've left out the subject.

I thought that as long as it's understand who the subject is you needn't say so long it be a pronoun. Unless this is only possible when the subject's been stated already (or informally)??

Never heard of this rule. What's your source?
"Richmond is a real scholar; Owen just learns languages because he can't bear not to know what other people are saying."--Margaret Lattimore on her two sons

Koko
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Re: [Scottish Gaelic] Translation requests

Postby Koko » 2015-08-08, 19:21

linguoboy wrote:
Koko wrote:
linguoboy wrote:No, because you've left out the subject.

I thought that as long as it's understand who the subject is you needn't say so long it be a pronoun. Unless this is only possible when the subject's been stated already (or informally)??

Never heard of this rule. What's your source?

This video tells us why in "Tha gu math" the pronoun is dropped because it's understood "Tha mi gu math."

GregMcC
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Re: [Scottish Gaelic] Translation requests

Postby GregMcC » 2015-08-19, 18:42

Hi all, new to the forum and I'm looking for a translation of 'I am beloved' curious if there us any difference if used by female or male genders ie how would a female say this if both are not the same?
Thanks in anticipation
Greg

My girl is looking to have 'I am beloved' in Scots Gaelic inked and we want to get it right, ps she wants a single word if there is one, so maybe just 'beloved' or 'loved'

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linguoboy
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Re: [Scottish Gaelic] Translation requests

Postby linguoboy » 2015-08-19, 19:25

GregMcC wrote:My girl is looking to have 'I am beloved' in Scots Gaelic inked and we want to get it right, ps she wants a single word if there is one, so maybe just 'beloved' or 'loved'

Good on you for wanting to make sure that it's correct. But as for the wording, I recommend looking at the third suggestion on this page.
"Richmond is a real scholar; Owen just learns languages because he can't bear not to know what other people are saying."--Margaret Lattimore on her two sons

scottishlassie
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Re: [Scottish Gaelic] Translation requests

Postby scottishlassie » 2015-09-11, 14:50

Feasgar Math!

I am currently trying to learn Gaelic - very slowly and I was hoping someone might be able to help with a few translations that I need. I am a card designer and will be attending my local Gaelic School Christmas Fair and so would like a range of Gaelic cards to sell.

Wedding Invitation-

To the Bride and Groom -

On your Wedding Day -

Good Luck

Congratulations

New Baby

Mòran Taing x

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Re: [Scottish Gaelic] Translation requests

Postby linguoboy » 2015-09-11, 16:07

scottishlassie wrote:Feasgar Math!

I am currently trying to learn Gaelic - very slowly and I was hoping someone might be able to help with a few translations that I need. I am a card designer and will be attending my local Gaelic School Christmas Fair and so would like a range of Gaelic cards to sell.

Wedding Invitation-

To the Bride and Groom -

On your Wedding Day -

Good Luck

Congratulations

New Baby

Mòran Taing x

If you're going to be selling your cards for profit, then the ethical thing to do would be to share a very modest amount of it with the people adding value to it. That is, pay a professional Scottish Gaelic translator. The amount of money is trivial in the grand scheme, but every little bit helps.
"Richmond is a real scholar; Owen just learns languages because he can't bear not to know what other people are saying."--Margaret Lattimore on her two sons

jadeandpaul
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Re: [Scottish Gaelic] Translation requests

Postby jadeandpaul » 2015-10-29, 1:37

Can someone show my wife and i how to pronounce the Scottish Gaelic girls name Adairia?

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Sectori
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Re: [Scottish Gaelic] Translation requests

Postby Sectori » 2015-11-30, 16:17

Koko wrote:
linguoboy wrote:
Koko wrote:
linguoboy wrote:No, because you've left out the subject.

I thought that as long as it's understand who the subject is you needn't say so long it be a pronoun. Unless this is only possible when the subject's been stated already (or informally)??

Never heard of this rule. What's your source?

This video tells us why in "Tha gu math" the pronoun is dropped because it's understood "Tha mi gu math."

a late reply: this is really only a thing for answers to the question ciamar a tha thu/sibh? (well, and for the 1st person conditionals where there are still verb endings that indicate the subject, but that's different) — otherwise Gaelic is very much not pro-drop.
tha dannsa nad ghluasadan,
’s bàrdachd neònach air cùl do bhruidhinn,
anns na faclan nach abair thu idir.

Koko
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Re: [Scottish Gaelic] Translation requests

Postby Koko » 2015-11-30, 23:15

Late or no, thanks Sectori! ^^

TatterJack
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Re: [Scottish Gaelic] Translation requests

Postby TatterJack » 2016-01-04, 19:49

I wonder if anyone might help me with a line I want to use in one of the current manuscripts I have in progress.
It's set in Scotland, so I need Scottish Gaelic, not Gaeilge.

"You're beautiful. May I kiss you?"

In case there are any gender based modalities, it's from a male to a female. And if there are formal and familiar forms (similar to the French Tu and Vous), this would be familiar.
My thanks indeed for any aid :-).

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Re: [Scottish Gaelic] Translation requests

Postby skippysasquirrel » 2016-02-24, 23:30

I'm reading Sir Walter Scott's Bride of Lammermoor. At one point in the story, a character says, "Skioch doch na skiall." That clearly isn't standard Scots Gaelic spelling, and you can imagine the trouble I've had trying to figure it out. I've figured out "doch" is probably "tog" (raise, as in raise a glass) or "tagh" (choose, as in sides). "Skiall" I'm guessing might have something to do with "skoal," the toast in Norse.

I'm at a loss. I've provided a bit more context below. Help is appreciated and thanks in advance!

"Then I don't like it at all," said Bucklaw; "so fill a brimmer of my auld auntie's claret, rest her heart! And, as the Hielandman says, Skioch doch na skiall."
"That was what tough old Sir Even Dhu used to say to me when I was out with the metall'd lads in 1689. 'Craigengelt,' he used to say, 'you are as pretty a fellow as ever held steel in his grip, but you have one fault.'"
"If he had known you as long as I have don," said Bucklaw, "he would have found out some twenty more; but hand long stories, give us your toast, man."
Craigengelt rose, went a-tiptoe to the door, peeped out, shut it carefully, came back again, clapped his tarnished gold-laced hat on one side of his head, took his glass in one hand, and touching the hilt of his hanger with the other, named, "The King over the water."

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linguoboy
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Re: [Scottish Gaelic] Translation requests

Postby linguoboy » 2016-02-25, 3:02

The glosses I've found (going back to Samuel Johnson's dictionary) render this into English as "Cut a drink with a tale" (i.e. don't preach over your liquor). "Tale" is sgeul and deoch is "drink", but I'm not sure which word for "cut" is intended, sgath, sgiod, or another entirely. Also the grammar doesn't make sense to me, since na sgeul should mean "of the tales" rather than "with a tale".

So I'm not sure if there's a genuine Gaelic saying here which Scott garbled or if he attempted to invent one and took a few liberties.
"Richmond is a real scholar; Owen just learns languages because he can't bear not to know what other people are saying."--Margaret Lattimore on her two sons

skippysasquirrel
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Re: [Scottish Gaelic] Translation requests

Postby skippysasquirrel » 2016-02-25, 20:11

That might be it, or something along those lines. The word-initial 's' in the first word might be "is," but the only word close to "kioch" I can find is "ceoch," which it seems means cloudy/nebulous, and I'm not sure how that would work.

Though Scott didn't speak Gaelic (as far as I know), he almost certainly had easy access to a Gaelic speaker or two in Edinburgh. Ah well. Frustrating.

Thanks though!

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Re: [Scottish Gaelic] Translation requests

Postby silmeth » 2016-10-24, 14:28

There is a very similar Irish saying, is túisce deoch ná scéal (“drink comes sooner than a story”, “rather a drink than a story”; “first a drink, then story-telling”).

So it’d be na sgeul in the meaning “than a story”, and not “of the story”.

As for the first word, Am Faclair Beag has a word sgoch for “cut” as a noun, but it doesn’t seem to make sense in this context (“cut of a drink than a story”?).

Google, when "deoch na sgeul" is searched, finds phrases is luaithe deoch na sgeul and bu luaithe deoch na sgeul (“sooner drink than story”, “drink was (would be?) sooner than story”).

Perhaps the text mixes some two cheer-phrases, one perhaps starting with sgoch (?), and the second being ’s luaithe deoch na sgeul.
polszczyzna jest moją mową ojczystą (pl)foghlaimeoir na Gaelainne Mumhan ’s ea mé (ga)mám, myslím, dobrou znalost češtiny, rozumím a něco mluvím (cs)

Sagoca676
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Re: [Scottish Gaelic] Translation requests

Postby Sagoca676 » 2016-12-23, 18:52

Hello, i hope that somebody can help me..
I wanna know the meaning of:
Gaol sìorraidh
Gràdh sìorraidh

I know that gaol and gràdh means 'love' but what is the diference? Which one were the best for say it to my husband?
I wanna say eternal love.


Thanx to all

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Re: [Scottish Gaelic] Translation requests

Postby Broken Wolf » 2017-01-07, 21:06

Can someone please translate the following?

Glory Is The Reward of Valour.

Thank you in advance.
Peace.


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