TAC 2017 - Mike (Albanian, Greek, Azerbaijani)

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Re: TAC 2017 - Mike - Greek, Azerbaijani, Turkish, Portuguese

Postby dEhiN » 2017-02-11, 19:09

Michael wrote:5. Former[16] US president Barack Obama has gone on his first vacation after leaving office on British millionaire[18] Richard Branson's private island in the Carribean[17].

I think "... after leaving office to British ..." sounds better than "on". Also, I believe "Carribean" is actually spelled "Caribbean".
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Re: TAC 2017 - Mike - Greek, Azerbaijani, Turkish, Portuguese

Postby voron » 2017-02-11, 19:40

dEhiN wrote:
Michael wrote:5. Former[16] US president Barack Obama has gone on his first vacation after leaving office on British millionaire[18] Richard Branson's private island in the Carribean[17].

I think "... after leaving office to British ..." sounds better than "on". Also, I believe "Carribean" is actually spelled "Caribbean".

Obama left office and spent his vacation on the millionare's island.

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Re: TAC 2017 - Mike - Greek, Azerbaijani, Turkish, Portuguese

Postby eskandar » 2017-02-11, 19:41

Michael wrote:1. əleyhinə | الیحینه -Ø+prep. against

علیهینه , I would think (from Arabic/Persian علیه)

17. vəzifə | وزیفه errand, engagement, office, duty, workload, responsibility

وظیفه
Please correct my mistakes in any language.

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Re: TAC 2017 - Mike - Greek, Azerbaijani, Turkish, Portuguese

Postby Michael » 2017-02-11, 19:57

eskandar wrote:
Michael wrote:1. əleyhinə | الیحینه -Ø+prep. against

علیهینه , I would think (from Arabic/Persian علیه)

17. vəzifə | وزیفه errand, engagement, office, duty, workload, responsibility

وظیفه

 (en) Those were the two words whose Ottoman transcriptions I couldn't quite get right, so I'll edit them. Düzəltdiklərinə görə çox təşəkkür! (For some reason, I initially thought the Perso-Arabic transcription of vəzifə had an ayn in between the vâv and the zâ, but I couldn't find anything online that would support that, so I ended up going with the transcription you corrected.)
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Re: TAC 2017 - Mike - Greek, Azerbaijani, Turkish, Portuguese

Postby dEhiN » 2017-02-11, 20:34

voron wrote:
dEhiN wrote:
Michael wrote:5. Former[16] US president Barack Obama has gone on his first vacation after leaving office on British millionaire[18] Richard Branson's private island in the Carribean[17].

I think "... after leaving office to British ..." sounds better than "on". Also, I believe "Carribean" is actually spelled "Caribbean".

Obama left office and spent his vacation on the millionare's island.

Yeah, I guess it's just that, for me, the use of two "on" prepositions so close together sound a bit odd to me. Not grammatically incorrect, just odd. Hence my "sounds better than". If I strip away the subordinate clause, you get "Former US president Barack Obama has gone on his first vacation on British...". That's why, for me, it sounds better to use "to".
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Re: TAC 2017 - Mike - Greek, Azerbaijani, Turkish, Portuguese

Postby Michael » 2017-02-11, 20:38

dEhiN wrote:
voron wrote:
dEhiN wrote:
Michael wrote:5. Former[16] US president Barack Obama has gone on his first vacation after leaving office on British millionaire[18] Richard Branson's private island in the Carribean[17].

I think "... after leaving office to British ..." sounds better than "on". Also, I believe "Carribean" is actually spelled "Caribbean".

Obama left office and spent his vacation on the millionare's island.

Yeah, I guess it's just that, for me, the use of two "on" prepositions so close together sound a bit odd to me. Not grammatically incorrect, just odd. Hence my "sounds better than". If I strip away the subordinate clause, you get "Former US president Barack Obama has gone on his first vacation on British...". That's why, for me, it sounds better to use "to".

I guess this is a case where I unintentionally didn't aim for an idiomatic translation. Also, I had spellcheck either disabled or set to another language when I let "Carribean [sic]" slip through my censors.
N: American English (en-us) Pizzonese (nap) | B1: Italian (it) Mexican Spanish (es-mx) Brazilian Portuguese (pt-br) Greek (el) | A2:  (sq) Persian (fa) Azerbaijani (az) | A1: Turkish (tr)
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Re: TAC 2017 - Mike - Greek, Azerbaijani, Turkish, Portuguese

Postby eskandar » 2017-02-11, 21:52

Michael wrote:Those were the two words whose Ottoman transcriptions I couldn't quite get right, so I'll edit them. Düzəltdiklərinə görə çox təşəkkür! (For some reason, I initially thought the Perso-Arabic transcription of vəzifə had an ayn in between the vâv and the zâ, but I couldn't find anything online that would support that, so I ended up going with the transcription you corrected.)

Xahiş elirəm. If it helps, you can see the word in context here, for example.
Please correct my mistakes in any language.

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Re: TAC 2017 - Mike - Greek, Azerbaijani, Turkish, Portuguese

Postby Michael » 2017-02-12, 7:03

It would appear that in my last translation, I misunderstood the meaning of a single word, thereby screwing up the whole section's translation. The word in question was supposed to be hissə حصّه "part", not hiss حسّ "feeling, vibe"; I was a little tired around the time I committed that minor but significant error:

3. Brüsseldə İlham Əliyevlə danışıqlardan əvvəl jurnalistlərlə görüşən Avropa Komissiyasının prezidenti Jean-Claude Juncker günün "gözəl hissəsinin [*hissinin deyil]" başa çatdığını[10] deyib.
3. European Commission president Jean-Claude Juncker meeting with journalists before conversations with Ilham Aliyev in Brussels said that the "good vibe part" of the day had come to a halt[10].
10. başa çatmaq | باشه چاتمق to culminate, conclude, end, expire

"Mən indi Azərbaycan prezidenti İlham Əliyevlə görüşəcəyəm, demək, günün gözəl hissəsi başa çatdı".
"I will now meet with president of Azerbaijan Ilham Aliyev, that is to say, the good vibe part of the day has come to a halt."
N: American English (en-us) Pizzonese (nap) | B1: Italian (it) Mexican Spanish (es-mx) Brazilian Portuguese (pt-br) Greek (el) | A2:  (sq) Persian (fa) Azerbaijani (az) | A1: Turkish (tr)
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Re: TAC 2017 - Mike - Greek, Azerbaijani, Turkish, Portuguese

Postby Michael » 2017-02-13, 14:12

 (el) I've "learned" (well, refreshed) all the new vocab from lessons one to four, and have added half of the vocab from the fifth. This book's Anki deck already consists of 371, almost four hundred, cards!
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Re: TAC 2017 - Mike - Greek, Azerbaijani, Turkish, Portuguese

Postby Michael » 2017-02-14, 9:28

 (az) Hə, bir ilə az qalmış nəticələnib ki, Üçüncü Baxılışı qurtarmağa uzatmışam, fəqət onun qurtardığı üçün bu gecəni istifadə etdim, axırda. Beləcə edib kitabdakı dördün-üçüncüsü ara dalınca rəsmən keçmiş, Anki kartalarımı hesablayaram:
  • 195 (yüz doxsan beş) dənə sifət
  • 67 (altmış yeddi) dənə zərf
  • 15 (on beş) dənə bağlayıcı
  • 48 (qırx səkkiz) dənə qrammatika göstəricisi
  • 9 (doqquz) dənə nida
  • 736 (yeddi yüz otuz altı) dənə isim
  • 93 (doxsan üç) dənə söz birləşməsi
  • 29 (iyirmi doqquz) dənə arxasında yerləşmə ("postpozisiya")
  • 34 (otuz dörd) dənə əvəzlik
  • 211 (iki yüz on bir) dənə fel

 (en) Well, it's been nearly a year that I've been procrastinating on getting past the Third Review, but I took the opportunity tonight to finally complete it. Having done so and officially gotten past the 3/4 threshold of the book, I shall take count of my Anki card stock:
  • Adjectives: 195
  • Adverbs: 67
  • Conjunctions: 15
  • Grammar: 48
  • Interjections: 9
  • Nouns: 736
  • Phrases: 93
  • Postpositions: 29
  • Pronouns: 34
  • Verbs: 211
Last edited by Michael on 2017-02-16, 19:25, edited 1 time in total.
N: American English (en-us) Pizzonese (nap) | B1: Italian (it) Mexican Spanish (es-mx) Brazilian Portuguese (pt-br) Greek (el) | A2:  (sq) Persian (fa) Azerbaijani (az) | A1: Turkish (tr)
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Re: TAC 2017 - Mike - Greek, Azerbaijani, Turkish, Portuguese

Postby Michael » 2017-02-14, 21:09

 (az) Hal-hazırda Onuncu Vahidin maddisi üçün təzə Anki kartaları yazıb-yaradıram, və bildirmişəm ki, fars dili qarşılıqlarının xatirə gətirməsi qabiliyyətim çox zəifdir. Kompüterdə xətdəki sözlüyü istifadə etmək üçün bir azca vaxtdan artıq sərf edəcəyimi demək istəsə də, mənim fars dili təlim dil kimi işlətməsi hərəkətim, sonunda ödəməyə başlayıb! Onsuz, indiki fars dili biliyimin halı artıq xarablaya biləcəkdi.

 (en) I'm currently creating new cards for the material in Unit 10, and I've noticed that I can barely recall any Persian equivalents. My decision to use Persian as the language of instruction has finally paid off, even if it means spending a bit more time at the computer in order to use the online dictionary. Without it, my Persian may have become even rustier than it currently is.
N: American English (en-us) Pizzonese (nap) | B1: Italian (it) Mexican Spanish (es-mx) Brazilian Portuguese (pt-br) Greek (el) | A2:  (sq) Persian (fa) Azerbaijani (az) | A1: Turkish (tr)
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Re: TAC 2017 - Mike - Azerbaijani, Turkish, Albanian, Portuguese, Greek

Postby Michael » 2017-02-26, 18:16

 (az) (tr) Not much to report on here. I've only learnt the new vocabulary from Unit 10 and haven't gone through any of its conversations or grammatical explanations. I guess it'll take me longer to complete Elementary Azerbaijani than I initially planned. 79%

 (sq) I had made an Anki deck for Discovering Albanian back in the summer when I had first started to learn Albanian, so I've been able to refresh all the material I had learned up until I abruptly lost the spark (up to Lesson 7). I'm pursuing Albanian with a renewed vigor now. :)

 (pt-br) In an attempt to migrate my Anki stuff to a new hard drive in order to put an end to the continual deck corruptions, I forgot to back up my deck for A intimação. :x But at least I got sufficient practice with my oral comprehension, since I've been binge-watching A Casa das Sete Mulheres this last week. I feel like my Portuguese is pretty strong, despite not having done any active study in 5 years.

 (el) I've already lost the willpower to refresh my Greek, but even so, I will leave it as a TAC language. My motivation in general seems to come in waves, almost like a tide.
N: American English (en-us) Pizzonese (nap) | B1: Italian (it) Mexican Spanish (es-mx) Brazilian Portuguese (pt-br) Greek (el) | A2:  (sq) Persian (fa) Azerbaijani (az) | A1: Turkish (tr)
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Re: TAC 2017 - Mike - Azerbaijani, Turkish, Albanian, Portuguese, Greek

Postby dEhiN » 2017-02-27, 5:06

Michael wrote:My motivation in general seems to come in waves, almost like a tide.

I can understand that (even though you may have been specifically referring to Greek). There are some days where I feel like I want to do more language study, but lately that hasn't been the case. Lately, most of the time I only have the willpower to do Anki and that's it. It's almost like after Anki, my brain gets tired.

I have thought of doing actual study, of the books I have, before I review Anki.
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Re: TAC 2017 - Mike - Azerbaijani, Turkish, Albanian, Portuguese, Greek

Postby Michael » 2017-03-04, 7:39

dEhiN wrote:I can understand that (even though you may have been specifically referring to Greek). There are some days where I feel like I want to do more language study, but lately that hasn't been the case. Lately, most of the time I only have the willpower to do Anki and that's it. It's almost like after Anki, my brain gets tired.

I have thought of doing actual study, of the books I have, before I review Anki.

As a matter of fact, I mustered the willpower to finally go over my Greek reviews on Anki the day after I had written that last update stating how I had lost the willpower to do anything with Greek. :lol: Yeah, I agree, Anki can get very tiresome, but it does force me to stay unconditionally disciplined with my language study ("No pain, no gain"). Speaking of which…

 (sq) I'm currently relearning the material from the fifth out of the 7/18 lessons whose material I had been able to import onto Anki last summer. Relearning it all has surprisingly been a breeze — all I need to do is scan over each section's material in the textbook before I tackle the new cards on the program, and all that knowledge that had become dormant is reawakened.

Here is a simple text from the fourth lesson along with its translation and my recording of it, for those of you who may wonder how Albanian sounds:

http://vocaroo.com/i/s0gq6AhG27Tm
Agroni
¶ Agroni është shqiptaro-amerikan dhe jeton në Amerikë, në Çikago. Babai i tij është shqiptar, kurse nëna e tij është amerikane. Agroni është 20 vjeç dhe studion në universitet. Në shtëpi nuk flasin shqip, sepse nëna e tij nuk flet asnjë fjalë shqip. Megjithatë, tani Agroni po studion shqip në universitet. Gjuha shqipe është pak e vështirë, prandaj ai studion disa orë çdo ditë. Agroni jeton në një konvikt. Megjithëse atje ka disa shokë shqiptarë, nuk flet shqip me ata, sepse ai flet shqip me vështirësi. Çdo ditë shkon në universitet. Në mbrëmje shkon në bibliotekë. Atje lexon dhe mëson. Të shtunën shkon në kinema ose në diskotekë.
¶ Agroni ka një vëlla dhe një motër. Vëllai i tij, Bledi, është i vogël. Ai është nxënës dhe shkon në shkollë nga e hëna deri të premten. Të shtunën luan futboll. Motra e tij, Bora, është sekretare dhe punon për një firmë italiane. Ajo është e martuar. Burri i saj është avokat. Ai jep edhe mësim në universitet. Ata nuk kanë fëmijë.

Translation:
► Show Spoiler


 (el) As I described on this thread, I brushed up on my Greek counting skills, which was sorely needed, as I almost completely forgot how to count in Greek. :shock: Finally got past Lesson 5/20: 25%.
N: American English (en-us) Pizzonese (nap) | B1: Italian (it) Mexican Spanish (es-mx) Brazilian Portuguese (pt-br) Greek (el) | A2:  (sq) Persian (fa) Azerbaijani (az) | A1: Turkish (tr)
Personal language journals: TAC ‘17 (general log) | Türkî/Türkçe
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Re: TAC 2017 - Mike - Azerbaijani, Turkish, Albanian, Portuguese, Greek

Postby dEhiN » 2017-03-06, 11:55

Your Albanian pronunciation is quite good! It sounds (to me) not that different from the Albanian songs I listen to. Though I did notice that the cluster "shq" you would either say as /ʃ/ or /c/, at least to my ears. For example, gjuha shqipe I say as /ɟuha ʃcipɛ/ and it sounded like you said /ɟuhɐ ʃipɛ/. But maybe that's just how I'm hearing it.

Now I really want to get the resource you have and start going through it. What are you using again?
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Re: TAC 2017 - Mike - Azerbaijani, Turkish, Albanian, Portuguese, Greek

Postby vijayjohn » 2017-03-06, 13:17

dEhiN wrote:Though I did notice that the cluster "shq" you would either say as /ʃ/ or /c/, at least to my ears. For example, gjuha shqipe I say as /ɟuha ʃcipɛ/ and it sounded like you said /ɟuhɐ ʃipɛ/. But maybe that's just how I'm hearing it.

No, I heard that, too, at least with the <shq>.

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Re: TAC 2017 - Mike - Azerbaijani, Turkish, Albanian, Portuguese, Greek

Postby Michael » 2017-03-06, 18:34

dEhiN wrote:Your Albanian pronunciation is quite good! It sounds (to me) not that different from the Albanian songs I listen to. Though I did notice that the cluster "shq" you would either say as /ʃ/ or /c/, at least to my ears. For example, gjuha shqipe I say as /ɟuha ʃcipɛ/ and it sounded like you said /ɟuhɐ ʃipɛ/. But maybe that's just how I'm hearing it.

Now I really want to get the resource you have and start going through it. What are you using again?

Actually, I contracted the [ʃc-] of the prescriptive pronunciation and pronounced it as /ɟuha ɕipɛ/, because, according to the Wikipedia article on the Albanian language, that's how it's pronounced in colloquial speech.

You can see the resources I use for all of my TAC languages in my title post.
N: American English (en-us) Pizzonese (nap) | B1: Italian (it) Mexican Spanish (es-mx) Brazilian Portuguese (pt-br) Greek (el) | A2:  (sq) Persian (fa) Azerbaijani (az) | A1: Turkish (tr)
Personal language journals: TAC ‘17 (general log) | Türkî/Türkçe
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Michael
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Re: TAC 2017 - Mike - Albanian, Greek, Azerbaijani, Turkish, Portuguese

Postby Michael » 2017-03-08, 1:56

Albanian and Greek have become more urgent in priority for me than Azerbaijani and Turkish, thus the change in the order of the languages.

 (sq) Relearnt all of the 696 cards already on the deck, and have completed the rest of Lesson 7 as well. Working to complete Lesson 8 at the moment. 39%

Here's a patriotic song, sung in Gheg dialect:
Rozana Radi - O sa mirë me ken shqipëtar (Oh, how good it is to be Albanian)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-rQtiw0LSx4

 (el) Consolidated Lesson 6. Brushed up on the points of the compass and the calendar. 30%
N: American English (en-us) Pizzonese (nap) | B1: Italian (it) Mexican Spanish (es-mx) Brazilian Portuguese (pt-br) Greek (el) | A2:  (sq) Persian (fa) Azerbaijani (az) | A1: Turkish (tr)
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Michael
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Re: TAC 2017 - Mike (Albanian, Greek, Azerbaijani)

Postby Michael » 2017-03-11, 2:58

 (sq) Completed Lesson 8 and have begun Lesson 9. Learnt several dozens of words pertaining to various foodstuffs (grains, fruits, vegetables), and have also been taught the formation of the subjunctive along with the invariable modal verbs mund "can, to be able to" and duhet "must, to have to" (cf. Greek πρέπει). The Albanian subjunctive is much simpler than its Greek counterpart, as in Albanian, only the second- and third-person singular subjunctive conjugations differ from their indicative equivalents, except for the irregular verbs jam "to be" and kam "to have", whose stem vowel itself changes from -a- to -e-, affecting all persons. 44%

 (el) Consolidated Lessons 7 and 8, learning vocabulary having to do with time and timekeeping (from the former) and trade and commerce (from the latter). 40%

To conclude this update, let me post an interesting video entitled (in Greek) "Population and settlements of the Arvanites (a somewhat irredentist ethnonym used to distinguish the centuries-old Albanian population of Greece, who are usually Orthodox and overwhelmingly identify as Greek, from Albanians living elsewhere) from 1879 to 1907", along with a translation:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oEoq7e6mceA

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The Greek national intelligentsia, besides the problem of the conflict regarding the "Slavic question" with Fallmerayer (defending the national myth that they constructed), was confronted from the start with a more serious, but vivid problem, the existence of the Albanians in Greece.

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Athens, the capital of the nascent kingdom, was geographically located in the midst of a sea of Albanian-speaking people, as it was surrounded by tens of Albanian villages.

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Anyone who decided to travel during the primordial years of the creation of the Greek state, from Malesina and Martinus of Locrida, to Castrion (Ermione) and Cranidion of the Peloponnese, a distance that with the sole mode of transportation at the time, horseback, would necessitate 75 hours of continuous travel [Gell 1827, p. 7] & [Molossós 1878], or with the necessary stops an entire week [Lithoxóou 1983, p. 57-58], was likely to not meet a single person from the villages through which he passed who could speak Greek with him, except for Theba and Megara.

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The German archaeologist and Philhellene Ludwig Ross, who came to Greece in order to assume management of the archaeological service and the seat of archaeology at the University of Athens, realizing the depth and span of the Albanian population, disappointingly noted in 1832, arriving in Greece: "I was, in theory, above Greek soil, amongst Greeks; in reality I wasn't. The naked rock of Hydra, the neighboring isles, Spetses and Porus, Castrion and Cranidion… had become occupied by Shqipëtarë Albanians" [Ros 1976, p. 25].

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The French archaeologist Edmond About, who lived in Greece for two years, wrote in 1855 that Athens was an Albanian village itself when it was [re-]established and that in addition, "Every evening, when the sun sets, you'll encounter huge groups of Albanians around Athens with their wives returning from work in the fields" [Ambou, p. 70].

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Meanwhile, the Scottish historian George Finlay, who lived half his life in Athens and came to familiarize himself with the country and its people, observed in 1861: "Greeks no longer lived in Marathon, in the Plataiai, in Leuctra, in Mantineia, in Eira and in Olympus, but Albanians did. Even in Athens, which has been for a quarter of a century and onward the capital of the Hellenic kingdom, one can hear the children who play in the streets near Theseius and Hadrian's Gate speaking in the Albanian language" [Finley, p. 46].

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Any foreigner who visited the country would initially become elated listening to the scholars of Athens beaming with pride about the archaic Hellenic origin of the population of Greece, but realizing the large number of Albanian inhabitants, would come to the same conclusion as did Fallmerayer: "All of these places that once upon a time were the heart and center of the Greeks are today New Albania" [Fallmerayer 1984, p. 74].

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The existence of the Albanians constituted such a serious problem for the architects of the Greek national myth, that Constantine Paparregopoulos himself, leader of Greek national historiography, suggested measures for a solution in 1854, since he was obliged to accept the Albanian reality: "Two races inhabit Greece, the Greek and the Albanian. Βut does the Albanian race constitute a nation in and of itself? Τhe sole element of ethnic identity that that race possesses, its language, will gradually retreat toward the victorious path of Hellenism" [Demaras 1986, p. 153].

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In Greek politics, when it comes to the "disappearance" of ethnic minorities, there is an unwritten guideline for any "national thinkers" who need to talk about minorities: "We speak generally and indefinitely, we don't like to be precise, that is to say, we don't show minority villages on the map, because there is an immediate danger of the "deterioration of its blue color" [quotes mine]. In the case of the Albanians, the first one who aimed for a complete record of their settlements was Athanasius Tsigos, but his work remained at the bottom of the chest, so that it was published almost half a century after his death" [Tsigos 1991, p. 56-61]. The second one was George Nakratzas, who infused any of the scattered information he had collected about Albanian villages onto maps [Nakratzas 1992, p. 80, 85, 143, 145, 151,153, 156, 161].

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The record-keeping of the minority villages, besides the colored distinctions on the map, allows a second task, the calculation of the exact amount of minorities, and in turn the rejection of fabricated formal statistics of censuses about native language, leading to great misery for Greek national authors. We purport to pass on this record-keeping of Albanian villages, the surveying of them and the calculation of their population, according to the figures of censuses from 1879 and 1907, that is to say, in a period during which the language was in daily use. Αpart from the aforementioned works of Tsigos and Nakratzas, specific resources were consulted for the rest of the provinces [Miliarákis 1886], [Philippson 1890], [Coryllus 1903], [Anagnostópoulos 1939], [Aïvaliotákis 1941], [Georgacas - McDonald 1968], [Guigas 1978], [Sáltaris 1986], [Yiohalás 2000 & 2002].

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The total amount of Albanians in the country rose from 176,120 individuals in 1879 to 236,707 in 1907. These figures, as a percentage of the total population of Greece, were 10.65% and 9% respectively. Those who lived in urban centers were not taken into account in the amount of Albanians. Formal data from the Statistical Service about the population of Albanians was 58,916 or 3.56% for 1879 [Apographe 1879] and 50,975 or 1.94% for 1907 [Apographe 1907].

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The 410 Albanian villages according to their geographical allotment were divided as such in 1907:
  1. In the province of Attica, 50 villages with a population of 46,105 individuals.
  2. In the province of Megaris, 9 villages with a population of 15,341 individuals.
  3. In the province of Aegine, 4 villages with a population of 1,180 individuals.
  4. In the province of Theba, 48 villages with a population of 30,898 individuals.
  5. In the province of Locrida, 11 villages with a population of 7,073 individuals.
  6. In the province of Lebadeia, 11 villages with a population of 4,841 individuals.
  7. In the province of Corinth, 61 villages with a population of 31,759 individuals.
  8. In the province of Argolida, 19 villages with a population of 8,674 individuals.
  9. In the province of Ermionida, 8 villages with a population of 15,560 individuals.
  10. In the province of Nauplia, 16 villages with a population of 5,933 individuals.
  11. In the province of Troizenia, 19 villages with a population of 15,285 individuals.
  12. In the province of Carystia, 53 villages with a population of 13,299 individuals.
  13. In the province of Andros, 17 villages with a population of 5,227 individuals.
  14. In the province of Trifylia, 17 villages with a population of 10,512 individuals.
  15. In the province of Patras, 31 villages with a population of 7,988 individuals.
  16. In the province of Calabryta, one village with a population of 981 individuals.
  17. In the province of Mantineia, one village with a population of 1,207 individuals.
  18. In the province of Heleia, 17 villages with a population of 6,303 individuals.
  19. In the province of Lacedaemon, 17 villages with a population of 10,773 individuals.
N: American English (en-us) Pizzonese (nap) | B1: Italian (it) Mexican Spanish (es-mx) Brazilian Portuguese (pt-br) Greek (el) | A2:  (sq) Persian (fa) Azerbaijani (az) | A1: Turkish (tr)
Personal language journals: TAC ‘17 (general log) | Türkî/Türkçe
I appreciate all corrections. In fact, I encourage them!
AVATAR: Satellite view of the southern Balkan Peninsula and Western Anatolia

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Michael
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Real Name: Miguel aka Mike
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Re: TAC 2017 - Mike (Albanian, Greek, Azerbaijani)

Postby Michael » 2017-04-02, 3:42

 (sq) A good 3 weeks have passed since I've done any actual language study, thus the lack of updates between then and now on my part. However, having finally completed Mësimi 9/18, I'm now at page 155/303, and have reached a solid 50% in progress, which is very encouraging! The ninth lesson was chock full of new concepts: I've mastered the accusative case, in particular the demonstrative forms in it as well as the minutiae of both definite and indefinite adjectives in the case; I reviewed cardinal numbers and also learnt the ordinals; I learned Class 3 and 4 verbs, which are, respectively: ha "to eat", pi "to drink", rri "to stay", di "to know (a fact)" and fle "to sleep"; iki "to go", eci "to walk, ride" and hipi "to climb, get on".

Class 3 verbs differ from the more common Class 1 [PRES.IND: -Vj | -Vn | -Vn | -Vjmë | -Vni | -Vjnë] and 2 [PRES.IND: -Vs | -Vt | -Vt | -Vsim | -Vsni | -Vsin] verbs in that the entire paradigm for their conjugations in the singular indicative is identical, being monosyllabic and ending in a vowel, and the paradigm for their conjugation in the plural indicative simply appends -më | -ni | -në (same paradigm as that of Class 1, save for the -Vj-) to said monosyllabic, vowel-final stems. The first-person singular indicative (and subjunctive) of Class 4 verbs ends in unstressed -i, while its second- and third-person singular indicatives end in unstressed -ën; these verbs have the same paradigm for the plural indicative as Class 2 verbs, except for the -Vs-.
N: American English (en-us) Pizzonese (nap) | B1: Italian (it) Mexican Spanish (es-mx) Brazilian Portuguese (pt-br) Greek (el) | A2:  (sq) Persian (fa) Azerbaijani (az) | A1: Turkish (tr)
Personal language journals: TAC ‘17 (general log) | Türkî/Türkçe
I appreciate all corrections. In fact, I encourage them!
AVATAR: Satellite view of the southern Balkan Peninsula and Western Anatolia


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