TAC 2017 - Antea (Russian, German, Arabic, Hindi)

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Re: TAC 2017 - Antea (Russian, German, Arabic, Hindi)

Postby voron » 2017-02-17, 13:49

Antea wrote:If now I begin to learn a dialect (with the time that it should imply, instead of improving my fussha Arabic), that would imply that I should only be able to use it with the people of that specific country. But what happen with people from other Arabic countries. How many dialects should I learn, then? I don't know if that would be very useful for me :hmm:

For me the reasoning is very simple. I like dreaming about being able to go to the country where my target language is spoken, and spend some time working there. With Turkey and Turkish, this dream came true. I don't know if it's going to happen with Arabic, but if it ever is, I'll certainly need a dialect. I doubt I'll feel comfortable enough to pass through all the routines (job interview, residence permit, work permit, renting a flat and whatever else may be needed), and eventually making good friends, if I don't speak a dialect.

So I guess the bottom line is, when choosing between learning MSA, or a dialect, or both, it all depends on your goals. If you want to be able to communicate with as many Arabs as possible, with the least learning effort, then I guess MSA is the right choice.

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Re: TAC 2017 - Antea (Russian, German, Arabic, Hindi)

Postby vijayjohn » 2017-02-17, 16:11

dEhiN wrote:I didn't know you could use fussha to speak to Arabic speakers.

I suspect it varies depending on education level and probably also whether an Arabic-speaker's school taught Fusha (I would think there were schools where Arabic was either not a required school subject or not taught at all in various parts of the Arabic-speaking world). The article Osias linked to claims that you may be understood if you speak it with Arabic-speakers but they won't necessarily be able to respond in it.

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Re: TAC 2017 - Antea (Russian, German, Arabic, Hindi)

Postby Antea » 2017-02-19, 9:35

Yes, I suppose it all depends on the goals or expectations one might have regarding the use of the language. In my case, unfortunately, I think it hardly likely that I could move to an Arabic speaking country and work there in Arabic. I know people that have done it (move to another country), but because they were westerners, their work was totally carried out in English. In fact, there are countries, were it is actually very difficult to speak Arabic with someone, because all the shops and services are carried out by foreigners, and everybody speaks English on a daily base (I'm now thinking of Dubai, for example).

But, of course, moving to another country and working in the goal language, that would be the best way to improve the language. Although I suppose, that may also require a very good level in that language, to be able to do the job in another language.

Has anyone tried it? Was it very difficult for you? I would be very glad to hear any experiences of working immersion. :yep:
Last edited by Antea on 2017-02-19, 11:12, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: TAC 2017 - Antea (Russian, German, Arabic, Hindi)

Postby dEhiN » 2017-02-19, 10:45

Antea wrote:I think it hardly difficult likely that I could move to an Arabic speaking country and work there in Arabic.

When we say hardly + adjective, it means that there isn't a good chance of that happening. So hardly likely means it is not (very) likely. Hardly difficult would mean it isn't (very) difficult.

If you want to use difficult in your sentence, I would change it to something like: I think it'll be difficult (for me) to move to an Arabic speaking country and work there in Arabic.
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Re: TAC 2017 - Antea (Russian, German, Arabic, Hindi)

Postby Antea » 2017-02-19, 11:14

Thanks, I corrected it. :D

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Re: TAC 2017 - Antea (Russian, German, Arabic, Hindi)

Postby eskandar » 2017-02-20, 6:10

Antea wrote:I listened to this video, which treats precisely the problem of teaching Fussha or dialects for Arabic teachers. I found it interesting, they speak clearly and I think I could understand it pretty well (though it's a long video, almost 1h30).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KA4PYlt1zaM

Thanks, I enjoyed watching this as well!

vijayjohn wrote:
dEhiN wrote:I didn't know you could use fussha to speak to Arabic speakers.

I suspect it varies depending on education level and probably also whether an Arabic-speaker's school taught Fusha (I would think there were schools where Arabic was either not a required school subject or not taught at all in various parts of the Arabic-speaking world). The article Osias linked to claims that you may be understood if you speak it with Arabic-speakers but they won't necessarily be able to respond in it.

AFAIK all schools throughout the Arabic-speaking world teach (some amount of) fuS7a, including English- or French-medium ones. They do differ in how much emphasis they place on it, however. In Syria, the medium of instruction is standard Arabic for all subjects, including high levels of science, which is why Syrians are famous for their strong command of fuS7a. In Egypt, Egyptian Arabic is used for most subjects (except "Arabic class") and English may be used for higher instruction; a similar dynamic is the case in many other Arab countries. In Tunisia, where fus7a competes with Tunisian Arabic, French, and English as languages of instruction, people as far as I could tell tended to have a relatively high level of fuS7a, probably because the quality of instruction there is high.

Antea wrote:In fact, there are countries, were it is actually very difficult to speak Arabic with someone, because all the shops and services are carried out by foreigners, and everybody speaks English on a daily base (I'm now thinking of Dubai, for example).

Yeah, this is true of most of the Gulf countries, where only a minority of the country's population is Arab (let alone local) and English is the dominant lingua franca.
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