Random language thread 5

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Aurinĭa
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Re: Random language thread 5

Postby Aurinĭa » 2017-07-08, 11:48

Diacritics replaced digraphs during the early 15th century, when Czech was usually called Bohemian. The háček was introduced during the late 16th century. Apparently Czech is spelled according to Polish spelling conventions in English because it was borrowed from Polish.

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Re: Random language thread 5

Postby dEhiN » 2017-07-09, 6:43

Meera wrote:I have noticed now that Arabic is starting to come into my English. I'm starting to add "the" to things that normally wouldn't have had it before. For example today my eye doctor asked me what I was studying and I said "the Arabic." :lol: I also realized that I am forming idafa's in English, like the other day I said "the family of my father."

I can relate, at least to the last part. I've sometimes found myself using the Romantic language way of forming possessives: "the family of my father" instead of a simpler "my father's family". Of course that still works in English, but I can tell it's Romance language interference.
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Re: Random language thread 5

Postby vijayjohn » 2017-07-09, 7:13

dEhiN wrote:Romantic language

Romance language :)

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Re: Random language thread 5

Postby Vlürch » 2017-07-09, 12:09

vijayjohn wrote:
dEhiN wrote:Romantic language

Romance language :)

The speakers of Romance languages are more romantic than everyone else in the world, though, according to a lot of people. :P

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Re: Random language thread 5

Postby dEhiN » 2017-07-09, 14:32

vijayjohn wrote:
dEhiN wrote:Romantic language

Romance language :)

I've had this conversation either on here and/or with specific individuals from here, but I always thought you could use the adjective romantic (but capitalized) to reference the Romance languages. I don't believe it's common usage, but I thought it was still possible, since romantic is the adjectival form of romance, irrespective of if the noun is being used as a proper noun or not.

Edit: Never mind, I just looked it up, and according to here the capitalised used of romantic only refers to a style of literature and art.
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Re: Random language thread 5

Postby Naava » 2017-07-09, 17:33

Vlürch wrote:
Naava wrote:
vijayjohn wrote:
wat

How the fuck is /z/ only pronounced [t͡ʃ]?

When is it even pronounced [t͡ʃ]? I'm quite sure I've never heard anyone pronouncing it like that.

But... it's the most common pronunciation ever, or at least that's how pretty much everyone I've ever known has pronounced it and I'm sure some newsreaders and whatnot have, because hearing [t͡s] always strikes me as a weird pronunciation. :o

What?? I could swear I've never heard it. Maybe it is a Helsinki thing indeed.

Do you really pronounce Zimbabwe and natsi with [t͡ʃ]? Do you also call the letter z 'tsheta'?
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Re: Random language thread 5

Postby OldBoring » 2017-07-09, 22:39

People from the capital are always weird.
(Including me)

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Re: Random language thread 5

Postby vijayjohn » 2017-07-10, 0:59

I'm from the capital of Texas. Our local motto is all about being weird. :P
Vlürch wrote:The speakers of Romance languages are more romantic than everyone else in the world, though, according to a lot of people. :P

But what about Romanians and Ladins and Bolivians and the Portuguese and Catalans and...?

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Re: Random language thread 5

Postby Saim » 2017-07-10, 3:33

vijayjohn wrote:But what about Romanians and Ladins and Bolivians and the Portuguese and Catalans and...?


You're expecting far too much coherence from racist stereotypes. :lol:

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Re: Random language thread 5

Postby vijayjohn » 2017-07-10, 3:59

Saim wrote:
vijayjohn wrote:But what about Romanians and Ladins and Bolivians and the Portuguese and Catalans and...?


You're expecting far too much coherence from racist stereotypes. :lol:

Oh, so now I have confirmation that Catalans aren't romantic. :twisted: Then again, neither am I.

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Re: Random language thread 5

Postby Michael » 2017-07-10, 4:06

In learning the Old English strong verb hēawan, I learned of its modern descendant "to hew" (past participle "hewn"), meaning "to chop up, cut, slash", for the first time.

EDIT: I was familiar with the verb "to hew", now that I think about it, but would only encounter it in an agricultural context, i.e. hewing grains of wheat in a mill.
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Re: Random language thread 5

Postby vijayjohn » 2017-07-10, 5:04

As I was leaving work today, I (randomly) noted to myself that I now know of one song in Telugu where a plain voiceless stop is pronounced with light aspiration ([naː əɭɭu t͡ʃɛbut̪unnaːji] :P), sort of like Korean (or English :silly:), and another one in Malayalam with a vowel + utterance-final nasal being pronounced as a nasalized vowel sort of like what The World's Major Languages at least says happens in Tamil ([n̪iːˈɾaːɖuʋãː], [n̪iˈɭəjil n̪iːˈɾaːɖuʋaːn]). (Those pronunciations are not consistent throughout either song, though).

Not to mention, of course, this Bollywood (i.e. Hindi) song where the first two lines are pronounced in an American accent even though the second line is in Hindi, and I'm pretty sure the English words in the title ("God Promise") are a calque on Hindi ([xʊˈd̪a ki qəˈsəm] 'I swear to God' but literally 'God's oath').

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Re: Random language thread 5

Postby Saim » 2017-07-10, 5:20

vijayjohn wrote:Oh, so now I have confirmation that Catalans aren't romantic. :twisted: Then again, neither am I.


Catalans are close-minded, nationalistic and stingey. I wish they spoke Spanish amongst themselves to accomodate me, it's a shame I can't use them for free language lessons because of how xenophobic they are.
#ILivein"Barca" #expat #sangria #ciudadanodelmundoqueacabaenlospirineos #CatalanisuselessinLatinAmerica

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Re: Random language thread 5

Postby vijayjohn » 2017-07-10, 5:31

Oh, by the way, Saim Bhai, just in case you aren't pissed off enough yet, I also just remembered this Telugu movie song where I just realized there are more English words than there are lines. Ugh! Oh well, I hate almost all the songs in this movie anyway. :P (Even though I kind of like the movie itself and the lead actress is a Malayalee my whole family and even OldBoring has seen onscreen from when she was much, much younger :)).

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Re: Random language thread 5

Postby Saim » 2017-07-10, 5:40

What's humerology? :lol: And what's the military got to do with it?

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Re: Random language thread 5

Postby vijayjohn » 2017-07-10, 5:55

Saim wrote:What's humerology? :lol:

One of these pathetic attempts in Indian movies to make a word like "humor" rhyme with a word like "numerology" :roll:

<Humorology> would at least make it a little clearer, but spelling is not the strong suit of whoever wrote the lyrics for this video. They also spelled churidar as <choodidaaru>. And the word after "twenty" is first spelled as <ssrlu>, then as <aarlu>. Wtf?
And what's the military got to do with it?

Apparently that part means "she expects perfection in everything. She must be in the military!" (South Indians are as far removed geographically as you could be in India from both Kashmir and northeast India, so I've noticed a lot of them tend to have ridiculously idealistic notions of what the army is like, closer to James Bond and such than to basically people (mostly men) who have been butchering their fellow countrymen since independence or longer. One of my mom's friends would talk about how she was so excited about how I could use all my languages to join the CIA every time I saw her).

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Re: Random language thread 5

Postby Saim » 2017-07-10, 6:27

How well do you understand Telugu and Kannada? I can't help but notice they're not in your profile.

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Re: Random language thread 5

Postby vijayjohn » 2017-07-10, 6:29

Saim wrote:How well do you understand Telugu and Kannada? I can't help but notice they're not in your profile.

Not at all. (Well, okay, Kannada is a little easier than Telugu because it's more closely related lol). The movie's available online with subtitles. :)

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Re: Random language thread 5

Postby Saim » 2017-07-10, 7:06

That was probably a stupid question, it seems that they diverged in 800BC or earlier (according to Wikipedia). I guess Tamil and Malayalam are the only two major Dravidian languages that are really "similar" from a language learner's perspective (i.e. much cognate discount, although I imagine shared Sanskritisms could also help). As far as I can tell Tulu, Kannada and Telugu are from completely different branches of Dravidian and as such are probably as different as... Arabic and Hebrew? Let alone Brahui, which is probably more transparent for the average Indo-Iranian-speaker than for the average Tamil.

Have you ever considered getting into any of the other branches of Dravidian? Or has the lack of resources made it not so worth it?

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Re: Random language thread 5

Postby vijayjohn » 2017-07-10, 7:42

It's not really stupid. Kannada and Telugu are only distantly related, but they're also spoken right next door to each other and are written in very, very similar scripts (if you learn one script, learning the other is trivial). This is because these two languages in particular share a long history of language contact, so as I understand it, each language has borrowed a whole bunch of words from the other. (I'm pretty sure I read about this somewhere, but now I don't remember where).

I would definitely love to learn both of these languages. I have good reason to learn Telugu in particular; one of my dad's friends used to work with AIDS patients in Andhra Pradesh. He died a few years ago, but his widow still carried on his work. She only speaks Telugu, so I don't think my dad would consider seeing her in person unless I learned it and went with him. I've definitely considered other branches of Dravidian, too. My advisor somehow got his hands on a copy of Parlons brahoui and gave it to me as a gift once.


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