Random language thread 4

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Re: Random language thread 4

Postby dEhiN » 2017-02-13, 6:57

Huh, Vijay your dad sounds like quite the fun-loving, jokester!
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Re: Random language thread 4

Postby vijayjohn » 2017-02-13, 6:59

My sense of humor didn't come out of thin air, you know. ;) I have a lot in common with him.

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Re: Random language thread 4

Postby OldBoring » 2017-02-13, 9:00

Does he make dad's jokes?

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Re: Random language thread 4

Postby vijayjohn » 2017-02-13, 13:20

OldBoring wrote:Does he make dad's jokes?

Yes (at least if I understand correctly what those are).

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Re: Random language thread 4

Postby Osias » 2017-02-13, 13:27

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Re: Random language thread 4

Postby vijayjohn » 2017-02-15, 1:53

Okay, I know Dravidian place names are hard for foreigners and all, but did people really have to call it Diamper? That almost sounds (and, even more so, looks) like "diaper"! :lol:

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Re: Random language thread 4

Postby Yasna » 2017-02-15, 21:02

Who said dictionaries have to be dry? :D

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Re: Random language thread 4

Postby dEhiN » 2017-02-16, 5:36

My latest post on księżyc's blog (which you can read here) made me wonder about the way I used to pronounce English /r/, and linguistically how that would be classified.

I have a high palate, and for the first 20-25 years of my life, as far as I can remember, I never used my tongue to say /r/. Well that's probably not technically true, but there was no raising of the tongue that I was aware of. It seemed more like my tongue stayed still and flat and I distinctly remember curling the right side of my lips which is how any sound came out.

Here's what I looked like:
IMG_20170216_003152.jpg
And here is a recording of me saying "I ran across the road to get the car" using my old way of pronouncing English /r/: http://vocaroo.com/i/s1T21aPTyf4i

Here is currently how I say that same phrase for comparison: http://vocaroo.com/i/s0yBD2MFDL6n
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Re: Random language thread 4

Postby vijayjohn » 2017-02-17, 0:48

I wonder whether it could be [ɰᵝ], a (near)-back compressed semivowel.

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Re: Random language thread 4

Postby dEhiN » 2017-02-17, 10:31

vijayjohn wrote:I wonder whether it could be [ɰᵝ], a (near)-back compressed semivowel.

Perhaps! That does seem to fit what I do. Thanks Vijay! You solved a decade long mystery for me. :D
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Re: Random language thread 4

Postby vijayjohn » 2017-02-17, 17:22

Bear in mind that I'm not certain about this at all. I'm no expert phonetician or anything, and my ears can be terrible. Just a guess on my part. :) You're welcome, though! :mrgreen:

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Re: Random language thread 4

Postby Michael » 2017-02-18, 22:09

I'm watching the pilot of a very compelling Brazilian miniseries, A Casa das Sete Mulheres (The House of the Seven Women), set in colonial Brazil in the late 1830's, and I noticed they use (v)uste and vosmecê instead of você, which suggests that vossa mercê had just started undergoing the process of apocopation around that time. Plus, tu was used much more often, obviously together with its respective conjugation. I think I even hear them using buênu (instead of bom meaning "well…") and buênas (instead of boas [tardes] meaning "good evening"), which of course is unexpected in Portuguese. I have to say, a well-made series all around.
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Re: Random language thread 4

Postby Osias » 2017-02-19, 1:52

"Tu" and "buenas" are still used in Rio Grande do Sul still today, along of other Spanish words. The actors of the series don't have a gaúcho accent, but as far as I know, the language used is accurate.

I think I saw the first episode when it was first aired, but I don't remember much.
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Re: Random language thread 4

Postby Michael » 2017-02-19, 2:22

osias wrote:"Tu" and "buenas" are still used in Rio Grande do Sul still today, along of other Spanish words. The actors of the series don't have a gaúcho accent, but as far as I know, the language used is accurate.

I think I saw the first episode when it was first aired, but I don't remember much.

Sim, é certo. Não ouvi muito do sotaque gaúcho, somente do carioca, paulista e baiano, mas ele não me veio à cabeça enquanto ouvia ao diálogo.

Estou acabando o segundo episódio agora, e neste episódio chegou o Giuseppe Garibaldi, herói da independência italiana, ao Rio Grande do Sul pra ajudar aos revolucionários ali conquistarem a independência daquele estado do Império Português (creio). Fiquei empulgado que o Giuseppe Garibaldi tivesse levado a cabo a aprendizagem da língua portuguesa! :D (Porém, não estou certo que ele tivesse feito tal coisa ou não…)
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Re: Random language thread 4

Postby Osias » 2017-02-19, 2:28

Michael wrote:Não ouvi muito do sotaque gaúcho, somente do carioca, paulista e baiano, mas ele não me veio à cabeça enquanto ouvia o diálogo.

Estou acabando o segundo episódio agora, e neste episódio chegou o Giuseppe Garibaldi, herói da independência italiana, ao Rio Grande do Sul pra ajudar aos revolucionários ali conquistarem a independência daquele estado do Império Português (creio).


Era o império brasileiro, mesmo, o Brasil teve dois imperadores: Dom Pedro I (primeiro) e Pedro II (segundo).

Durante essa época, o governo... mmmm, melhor calar a boca pra não dar spoiler.
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Re: Random language thread 4

Postby Michael » 2017-02-19, 2:39

Osias wrote:Era o império brasileiro, mesmo, o Brasil teve dois imperadores: Dom Pedro I (primeiro) e Pedro II (segundo).

Durante essa época, o governo... mmmm, melhor calar a boca pra não dar spoiler.

Nossa! Por alguma razão desconhecida, eu pensei que a data da independência estivesse lá nos anos mil oitocentos cinquenta, mas não, é o 7 de Setembro de 1822.

Graças pela sua atenciosa consideração. :) Acredito que esta série já ficou a minha predileta.
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Re: Random language thread 4

Postby Osias » 2017-02-19, 2:48

Michael wrote:
Osias wrote:Era o império brasileiro, mesmo, o Brasil teve dois imperadores: Dom Pedro I (primeiro) e Pedro II (segundo).

Durante essa época, o governo... mmmm, melhor calar a boca pra não dar spoiler.

Nossa! Por alguma razão desconhecida, eu pensei que a data da independência estivesse lá nos anos mil oitocentos cinquenta, mas não, é o 7 de Setembro de 1822.

Obrigado pela sua atenciosa consideração. :) Acredito que esta série já virou a minha predileta.
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Re: Random language thread 4

Postby vijayjohn » 2017-02-19, 2:49

Osias wrote:along of with

;)

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Re: Random language thread 4

Postby OldBoring » 2017-02-19, 2:50

Osias wrote:
Obrigado pela sua atenciosa consideração. :) Acredito que esta série já virou a minha predileta.

Por quê corrigiu o sacro idioma portunhol com o português? :evil:

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Re: Random language thread 4

Postby Osias » 2017-02-19, 2:53

Faltou a bandeirinha do portunhol pra indicar a intenção.
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