Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

This is our main forum. Here, anything related to languages and linguistics can be discussed.

Moderators: Global Moderators, Forum Administrators

User avatar
Dormouse559
Language Forum Moderator
Posts: 5798
Joined: 2010-05-30, 0:06
Real Name: Matthew
Gender: male
Country: US United States (United States)

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby Dormouse559 » 2017-03-03, 1:12

 (fr)
griller un feu rouge - to run a red light
bonbonne de gaz f - gas cylinder
N'hésite pas à corriger mes erreurs.

User avatar
Michael
Posts: 6810
Joined: 2009-07-21, 3:07
Real Name: Miguel aka Mike
Gender: male
Location: Oak Park (subúrbio de Chicago), Illinois
Country: US United States (United States)
Contact:

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby Michael » 2017-03-03, 1:50

dEhiN wrote:
Michael wrote: (sq) t’qifsha fuck you

Would that be pronounced /t(ə) cifʃa/? Or maybe something more like /t͡cifʃa/?

The former, as it's simply a truncation of të qifsha.
N: American English (en-us) Pizzonese (nap) | B1: Italian (it) Mexican Spanish (es-mx) Brazilian Portuguese (pt-br) Greek (el) | A2: Persian (fa) Azerbaijani (az) | A1: Turkish (tr)  (sq)
Personal language journals: TAC ‘17 (general log) | Türkî/Türkçe
I appreciate all corrections. In fact, I encourage them!
AVATAR: Mustafa Kemal Atatürk, founder of the modern Turkish Republic and champion of secularism

User avatar
Michael
Posts: 6810
Joined: 2009-07-21, 3:07
Real Name: Miguel aka Mike
Gender: male
Location: Oak Park (subúrbio de Chicago), Illinois
Country: US United States (United States)
Contact:

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby Michael » 2017-03-04, 3:39

I'm currently going over Greek numbers, and I just learned a few ordinal numbers that I've never encountered before:

 (el)
δισχιλιοστός [ðisçiʎɔsˈtɔs] 2000th (ordinal of δυο χιλιάδες)
δεκακισχιλιοστός [ðɛkacisçiʎɔsˈtɔs] 10,000th (ordinal of δέκα χιλιάδες)
εκατοντάκισχιλιοστός [ɛkatɔⁿˈd̪acisçiʎɔsˈtɔs] 100,000th (ordinal of εκατό χιλιάδες)

The third one is so long, that it needs to be marked with two tonoi (markers of stress)! :shock:
N: American English (en-us) Pizzonese (nap) | B1: Italian (it) Mexican Spanish (es-mx) Brazilian Portuguese (pt-br) Greek (el) | A2: Persian (fa) Azerbaijani (az) | A1: Turkish (tr)  (sq)
Personal language journals: TAC ‘17 (general log) | Türkî/Türkçe
I appreciate all corrections. In fact, I encourage them!
AVATAR: Mustafa Kemal Atatürk, founder of the modern Turkish Republic and champion of secularism

User avatar
Vlürch
Posts: 382
Joined: 2014-05-06, 8:42
Gender: male
Location: Roihuvuori, Helsinki
Country: FI Finland (Suomi)

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby Vlürch » 2017-03-05, 7:04

English (en) undinism
Chinese (zh) 水色情 - undinism

I came across this on my quest to learn lewd colour terms in Japanese and Chinese on the side. Of course, it's 水 + 色情 and not 水色 + 情, but still. It's not like the meaning of the Chinese term isn't obvious or that there's anything surprising about sexual arousal by water being a thing, but I was surprised that there's such a specific English word for it. The inclusion of urination is also kind of surprising, since the word "urolagnia" exists for just that, but then again, so does "aquaphilia" for the non-urinary water sexuality.

On a related note, I didn't know "watersports" could refer to anything other than sexual things with urine until like a year or two ago... an old couple interviewed in some TV show talked about their love of watersports and I was giggling like hell because I kept thinking of something completely different than what they actually meant, which only became clear when they were shown driving around on scooters and playing water polo and stuff. I still thought that they were talking about pissing on each other but got filmed doing those things as a joke, and actually laughed even more since "watersports" referring to actual sports in water made sense. I'm still not entirely sure about that, and feel like they did mean urolagnia and just wanted to see how far they could push it on a family show. It did turn out that "watersports" can mean just that, though, so I don't know...

Also, I find it interesting that a lot of Japanese and Chinese lewd colour terms seem to be almost mutually exclusive to the languages; 黄片 is rare in Japanese, 桃色 with the meaning of "erotic" is common in Chinese while in Japanese ピンク is used instead, etc.

By the way, is there a more technical term for "lewd colour term"? I like "lewd colour term", but it's not very formal. Erotochromatic vocabulary, maybe? :P

User avatar
dEhiN
Posts: 3306
Joined: 2013-08-18, 2:51
Real Name: David
Gender: male
Location: Toronto
Country: CA Canada (Canada)
Contact:

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby dEhiN » 2017-03-06, 6:02

Vlürch wrote:English (en) undinism
Chinese (zh) 水色情 - undinism

I came across this on my quest to learn lewd colour terms in Japanese and Chinese on the side. Of course, it's 水 + 色情 and not 水色 + 情, but still. It's not like the meaning of the Chinese term isn't obvious or that there's anything surprising about sexual arousal by water being a thing, but I was surprised that there's such a specific English word for it. The inclusion of urination is also kind of surprising, since the word "urolagnia" exists for just that, but then again, so does "aquaphilia" for the non-urinary water sexuality.

So I looked up those 3 terms on various medical dictionaries, and here are the results: undinism, urolagnia, and aquaphilia.

From what I can see, the meanings can overlap but not always. So aquaphilia seems to include sexual paraphilia around water, but can also refer to other types of love for water. Most of the definitions for urolagnia seemed to specify arousal by sight or thought, while one definition of undinism specified smell. So, as usual with multiple English technical terms that seem to refer to the same thing, there are slight variations in nuance or meaning.

Vlürch wrote:On a related note, I didn't know "watersports"...

Yeah I would venture that "watersports / water sports" referred to sports in water before the more slang meaning of a sexual paraphilia.

Vlürch wrote:By the way, is there a more technical term for "lewd colour term"? I like "lewd colour term", but it's not very formal. Erotochromatic vocabulary, maybe? :P

Don't forget that a technical term and a formal term aren't necessarily the same thing. I'm not sure what the technical term would be, but personally I wouldn't consider "lewd colour term" as particularly informal.
Follow my TAC 2017 here.

(N)  (en-CA) | (B2/B1)  (fr) | (B1/A2)  (es-CO) (pt-BR) | (A1/A0)  (de) (fy) (hi)  (hu) (id) (it) (ja) (ko) (oc) (oj) (pl) (ro) (sq) (sv) (ta-LK) (tl) (tr) (zh)

vijayjohn
Language Forum Moderator
Posts: 14513
Joined: 2013-01-10, 8:49
Real Name: Vijay John
Gender: male
Location: Austin
Country: US United States (United States)

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby vijayjohn » 2017-03-06, 7:42

dEhiN wrote:Yeah I would venture that "watersports / water sports" referred to sports in water before the more slang meaning of a sexual paraphilia.

I don't think I even knew it could mean anything other than sports in water until after I joined this forum. I've never seen anyone else use it to mean anything sexual as often as Vlürch does. :lol:

User avatar
dEhiN
Posts: 3306
Joined: 2013-08-18, 2:51
Real Name: David
Gender: male
Location: Toronto
Country: CA Canada (Canada)
Contact:

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby dEhiN » 2017-03-06, 10:33

vijayjohn wrote:
dEhiN wrote:Yeah I would venture that "watersports / water sports" referred to sports in water before the more slang meaning of a sexual paraphilia.

I don't think I even knew it could mean anything other than sports in water until after I joined this forum. I've never seen anyone else use it to mean anything sexual as often as Vlürch does. :lol:

I have a feeling that's because "watersports" and "toilet play" (which would include watersports) are niche fetishes that (at least from my experiences) people get introduced to through porn, or a play partner that's into it. At which point, they either think "this is gross! I'm never doing that again" or they think "this is kinda kinky and is turning me on...". Of course I'm sure there are some who don't like it at first, and then for various reasons keep trying it and eventually start liking it. As for Vlürch's oft usage of the sexual meaning, that probably derives from him being exposed to the term mainly/mostly (if not solely) in the context of porn and/or other sexual environments.
Follow my TAC 2017 here.

(N)  (en-CA) | (B2/B1)  (fr) | (B1/A2)  (es-CO) (pt-BR) | (A1/A0)  (de) (fy) (hi)  (hu) (id) (it) (ja) (ko) (oc) (oj) (pl) (ro) (sq) (sv) (ta-LK) (tl) (tr) (zh)

User avatar
Vlürch
Posts: 382
Joined: 2014-05-06, 8:42
Gender: male
Location: Roihuvuori, Helsinki
Country: FI Finland (Suomi)

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby Vlürch » 2017-03-06, 13:41

dEhiN wrote:
vijayjohn wrote:
dEhiN wrote:Yeah I would venture that "watersports / water sports" referred to sports in water before the more slang meaning of a sexual paraphilia.

I don't think I even knew it could mean anything other than sports in water until after I joined this forum. I've never seen anyone else use it to mean anything sexual as often as Vlürch does. :lol:

I have a feeling that's because "watersports" and "toilet play" (which would include watersports) are niche fetishes that (at least from my experiences) people get introduced to through porn, or a play partner that's into it. At which point, they either think "this is gross! I'm never doing that again" or they think "this is kinda kinky and is turning me on...". Of course I'm sure there are some who don't like it at first, and then for various reasons keep trying it and eventually start liking it. As for Vlürch's oft usage of the sexual meaning, that probably derives from him being exposed to the term mainly/mostly (if not solely) in the context of porn and/or other sexual environments.

Heh, yeah, I first encountered the term either in the context of porn or when reading about fetishes. I personally go in the "that's gross" category when it comes to bodily fluids (including the ones that shouldn't induce that reaction, like saliva and sweat; one of the main reasons I never want to have sex is that it's sweaty (although I'm fine with cum (well, I mean, if some random dude randomly came on me, that'd be gross... but you know what I mean))), but all the weird sexual fetishes people have are interesting because the human mind is interesting, and sexuality is a big part of it. Since evacuating the bowels and bladder is a big part of people's daily life, it makes sense for people to want to combine the two in an attempt to make the latter less boring and, in the case of diarrhoea, shitty. I had to.

Anyway,
Japanese (ja) 幽体離脱 (yūtai ridatsu) - out-of-body experience
Japanese (ja) 体外離脱 (taigai ridatsu) - out-of-body experience
Japanese (ja) 幽鬱 (yūutsu) - depression
Kinda surprised I didn't know either of the first two already since I'm into all kinds of weird spiritual stuff, and only learned by checking on Wiktionary other words with 幽 besides 幽霊. I'm not sure if the latter counts as the last word I learned since I was familiar with 憂鬱, and it's the alternative form spelled with 幽 that I didn't know, but I guess it's close enough to a new word.

User avatar
linguoboy
Posts: 19102
Joined: 2009-08-25, 15:11
Real Name: Da
Location: Chicago
Country: US United States (United States)

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby linguoboy » 2017-03-06, 16:17

"Aquaphilia" makes my teeth itch. It's not like "hydro-" is an obscure combining element. True, hydrophilia exists and is defined as "a love of being near water" (OED), but it's a rare word and the meaning could easily be extended.

The last word in a foreign language I learnt is Polish zdrobnienie "diminutive" from the adjective drobny "minute" (from Common Slavic *drobь "entrails").
"Richmond is a real scholar; Owen just learns languages because he can't bear not to know what other people are saying."--Margaret Lattimore on her two sons

User avatar
dEhiN
Posts: 3306
Joined: 2013-08-18, 2:51
Real Name: David
Gender: male
Location: Toronto
Country: CA Canada (Canada)
Contact:

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby dEhiN » 2017-03-13, 14:35

 (fr) le mot-dièse hashtag (official word)
 (fr-CA) le mot-clic hashtag
 (fr-QC) la poudrerie blowing snow
Follow my TAC 2017 here.

(N)  (en-CA) | (B2/B1)  (fr) | (B1/A2)  (es-CO) (pt-BR) | (A1/A0)  (de) (fy) (hi)  (hu) (id) (it) (ja) (ko) (oc) (oj) (pl) (ro) (sq) (sv) (ta-LK) (tl) (tr) (zh)

User avatar
Dormouse559
Language Forum Moderator
Posts: 5798
Joined: 2010-05-30, 0:06
Real Name: Matthew
Gender: male
Country: US United States (United States)

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby Dormouse559 » 2017-03-13, 22:21

 (fr) dru - (of hair) thick
N'hésite pas à corriger mes erreurs.

User avatar
linguoboy
Posts: 19102
Joined: 2009-08-25, 15:11
Real Name: Da
Location: Chicago
Country: US United States (United States)

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby linguoboy » 2017-03-13, 22:25

Dormouse559 wrote: (fr) dru - (of hair) thick

Wow, a rare Gaulish survival! (Cf. Welsh drud "bold person; hero")
"Richmond is a real scholar; Owen just learns languages because he can't bear not to know what other people are saying."--Margaret Lattimore on her two sons

vijayjohn
Language Forum Moderator
Posts: 14513
Joined: 2013-01-10, 8:49
Real Name: Vijay John
Gender: male
Location: Austin
Country: US United States (United States)

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby vijayjohn » 2017-03-14, 0:00

The only two possible Gaulish survivals that I always remember off the top of my head are chêne 'oak tree' and if 'yew tree'. I don't remember how I learned chêne, probably in one of my French books or something. I learned if from mishearing one of my classmates' French names in the very first French class I attended.

All of us had to pick random words or phrases in French as names for ourselves in that class. There was someone named Gorille 'gorilla' and I think also someone named Neige 'snow', for example, and probably there was also a Singe 'monkey' and a Canard 'duck'; my own name was Languedoc simply because I had just learned about Occitan and was fascinated by that particular region of France at the time. Anyway, one of my classmates was named Ruban Adhésif 'scotch tape', and whenever our French teacher called out her name, I always misheard this as Ruban des Ifs even though 'ribbon of the yew trees' doesn't make much sense. That led me to look up if.
Last edited by vijayjohn on 2017-03-14, 1:02, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
Dormouse559
Language Forum Moderator
Posts: 5798
Joined: 2010-05-30, 0:06
Real Name: Matthew
Gender: male
Country: US United States (United States)

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby Dormouse559 » 2017-03-14, 0:54

linguoboy wrote:Wow, a rare Gaulish survival! (Cf. Welsh drud "bold person; hero")
I love the semantic spread here.

vijayjohn wrote:All of us had to pick random words or phrases in French as names for ourselves in that class.
My class picked names for ourselves, but they were actual French given names. :P I was Fernand. You should have persuaded someone sitting next to you to call themselves Roussillon.
N'hésite pas à corriger mes erreurs.

vijayjohn
Language Forum Moderator
Posts: 14513
Joined: 2013-01-10, 8:49
Real Name: Vijay John
Gender: male
Location: Austin
Country: US United States (United States)

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby vijayjohn » 2017-03-14, 1:06

The reaction I kept getting to that name was "Long Duck? What?" :lol:

User avatar
dEhiN
Posts: 3306
Joined: 2013-08-18, 2:51
Real Name: David
Gender: male
Location: Toronto
Country: CA Canada (Canada)
Contact:

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby dEhiN » 2017-03-14, 18:07

linguoboy wrote:
Dormouse559 wrote: (fr) dru - (of hair) thick

Wow, a rare Gaulish survival! (Cf. Welsh drud "bold person; hero")

According to WordReference, it can also be used of vegetation, of rain (where it could be translated as heavy), and translated as vigorous.
Follow my TAC 2017 here.

(N)  (en-CA) | (B2/B1)  (fr) | (B1/A2)  (es-CO) (pt-BR) | (A1/A0)  (de) (fy) (hi)  (hu) (id) (it) (ja) (ko) (oc) (oj) (pl) (ro) (sq) (sv) (ta-LK) (tl) (tr) (zh)

vijayjohn
Language Forum Moderator
Posts: 14513
Joined: 2013-01-10, 8:49
Real Name: Vijay John
Gender: male
Location: Austin
Country: US United States (United States)

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby vijayjohn » 2017-03-15, 0:31

dEhiN wrote:
linguoboy wrote:
Dormouse559 wrote: (fr) dru - (of hair) thick

Wow, a rare Gaulish survival! (Cf. Welsh drud "bold person; hero")

According to WordReference, it can also be used of vegetation, of rain (where it could be translated as heavy), and translated as vigorous.

I'm starting to have serious doubts about using WordReference as a reliable source. Where do they get their information from? :hmm:

User avatar
dEhiN
Posts: 3306
Joined: 2013-08-18, 2:51
Real Name: David
Gender: male
Location: Toronto
Country: CA Canada (Canada)
Contact:

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby dEhiN » 2017-03-15, 5:25

vijayjohn wrote:
dEhiN wrote:
linguoboy wrote:
Dormouse559 wrote: (fr) dru - (of hair) thick

Wow, a rare Gaulish survival! (Cf. Welsh drud "bold person; hero")

According to WordReference, it can also be used of vegetation, of rain (where it could be translated as heavy), and translated as vigorous.

I'm starting to have serious doubts about using WordReference as a reliable source. Where do they get their information from? :hmm:

Well Wiktionary does indicate just thick as an adjectival meaning (along with (of hair) thick), as well as heavily as an adverbial meaning with the example sentence being il pleut dru. Further, even le Trésor de la langue française informatisé entry, which Wiktionary references, has as a first point the use of dru with vegetation. So all in all, WordReference's translations seem on point.
Follow my TAC 2017 here.

(N)  (en-CA) | (B2/B1)  (fr) | (B1/A2)  (es-CO) (pt-BR) | (A1/A0)  (de) (fy) (hi)  (hu) (id) (it) (ja) (ko) (oc) (oj) (pl) (ro) (sq) (sv) (ta-LK) (tl) (tr) (zh)

User avatar
Dormouse559
Language Forum Moderator
Posts: 5798
Joined: 2010-05-30, 0:06
Real Name: Matthew
Gender: male
Country: US United States (United States)

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby Dormouse559 » 2017-03-15, 16:37

vijayjohn wrote:I'm starting to have serious doubts about using WordReference as a reliable source. Where do they get their information from? :hmm:

As far as I can tell, they give no information about their methods for compiling the in-house dictionary, and I'll grant that's unsettling. However, I've never noticed any serious errors in their French-English section. I consider it quite reliable, at least for that language pairing. Maybe don't cite it in your translation dissertation, but otherwise, it should give you valid information. I should add though that even with a source I trust like WordReference, I normally check it against other resources. I might consult as many as three other sites before settling on the best way to translate something.
N'hésite pas à corriger mes erreurs.

User avatar
Dormouse559
Language Forum Moderator
Posts: 5798
Joined: 2010-05-30, 0:06
Real Name: Matthew
Gender: male
Country: US United States (United States)

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby Dormouse559 » 2017-03-21, 1:58

 (fr)
ventriloque m/f - ventriloquist
botter en touche - evade an issue, a question; pass the buck; punt

fraise (du dentiste) f - (dentist's) drill
N'hésite pas à corriger mes erreurs.


Return to “General Language Forum”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest