The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby Osias » 2017-01-23, 19:48

Feels like me, only with Portuguese and posts on TAC subforum.
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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby linguoboy » 2017-01-23, 20:18

Osias wrote:Feels like me, only with Portuguese and posts on TAC subforum.

I guess that makes you a meticuguês?
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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby Osias » 2017-01-23, 21:49

Now that's a word that doesn't even invite porn puns, it is a porn pun.
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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby linguoboy » 2017-01-31, 16:58

 (en) flannel (v.)
 (en) kamilavka, klobuk
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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby dEhiN » 2017-02-04, 17:18

 (en) whiskering (fashion) The fading of creases in blue jeans, especially around the crotch; often added artificially in order to simulate a "worn" look
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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby vijayjohn » 2017-02-04, 18:33

Osias wrote:Now that's a word that doesn't even invite porn puns, it is a porn pun.

I don't get it. :doggy:

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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby Osias » 2017-02-05, 0:19

"meti" sounds like "mete", from the verb "meter", "to stick". In third person, "he sticks". It's slang for sex. "cu" means asshole and...
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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby vijayjohn » 2017-02-05, 0:29

Oh. Okay, now I get it. :silly: Obrigado!

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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby danmayofficial » 2017-02-08, 15:09

'Phatic'

Pointless chatter with no real consequence or meaning.

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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby Dormouse559 » 2017-02-08, 15:54

 (en-us) anthimeria - usage of a word as a different part of speech than normal (so verbing, nouning and such)
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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby dEhiN » 2017-02-08, 21:00

 (en) appellant a person who has made an appeal in court
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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby linguoboy » 2017-02-09, 16:18

 (en) prodigal

It's weird to list this one, since I've "known" it for most of my life, but only in the collocation "prodigal son". Since to me the point of the story is that the son's genuine contrition wins him forgiveness, I've always assumed "prodigal" meant something like "remorseful". Recently, though, someone asked me what the relationship was between "prodigal" and "prodigy" and I didn't know so I looked it up and was surprised to find that the definition of "prodigal" is actually "wastefully extravagant" (< Latin prodigere "squander").
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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby dEhiN » 2017-02-09, 21:41

linguoboy wrote: (en) prodigal

It's weird to list this one, since I've "known" it for most of my life, but only in the collocation "prodigal son". Since to me the point of the story is that the son's genuine contrition wins him forgiveness, I've always assumed "prodigal" meant something like "remorseful". Recently, though, someone asked me what the relationship was between "prodigal" and "prodigy" and I didn't know so I looked it up and was surprised to find that the definition of "prodigal" is actually "wastefully extravagant" (< Latin prodigere "squander").

Yeah I used to think the same as you, but then several years ago I heard a sermon in a church where the pastor explained the meaning of prodigal, and went on to say that in some ways it that parable could also have been called the prodigal father, due to the way the father lauded on the son when he returned.
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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby Osias » 2017-02-09, 23:23

I think most people here also don't know that. I know this since childhood, probably because my father is a pastor.

But I've also seen the word in other contexts, like a law class where the professor told us if a person has some kind of mental issue that makes they start to spend all their money and other assets, the family could somehow prevent this juridically. And the term used by the law was "prodigal". ("pródigo" in Portuguese)
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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby vijayjohn » 2017-02-10, 1:10

dEhiN wrote:
linguoboy wrote: (en) prodigal

It's weird to list this one, since I've "known" it for most of my life, but only in the collocation "prodigal son". Since to me the point of the story is that the son's genuine contrition wins him forgiveness, I've always assumed "prodigal" meant something like "remorseful". Recently, though, someone asked me what the relationship was between "prodigal" and "prodigy" and I didn't know so I looked it up and was surprised to find that the definition of "prodigal" is actually "wastefully extravagant" (< Latin prodigere "squander").

Yeah I used to think the same as you, but then several years ago I heard a sermon in a church where the pastor explained the meaning of prodigal, and went on to say that in some ways it that parable could also have been called the prodigal father, due to the way the father lauded on the son when he returned.

:shock: I never knew anyone thought the father in that story was wastefully extravagant. How extravagant could he even have been, especially compared to his son? Wasn't he just some farmer or something?

Sorry. I'm just having some trouble wrapping my head around that. :P

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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby dEhiN » 2017-02-10, 4:55

vijayjohn wrote:I never knew anyone thought the father in that story was wastefully extravagant. How extravagant could he even have been, especially compared to his son? Wasn't he just some farmer or something?

Really? You can read more about it on the Wikipedia page. But I'll highlight some stuff and summarize.

Basically the interpretation most Biblical scholars and pastors/priests (at least as far as I'm aware) go with is that:
The request of the younger son for his share of the inheritance is "brash, even insolent"[7] and "tantamount to wishing that the father was dead."[7]
In Luke 15:17-20 (in the World Edition Bible), after the son had squandered all the inheritance and had gotten a job feeding the pigs (which I believe culturally would have been considered filthy and unclean), he comes to his senses:
But when he came to himself he said, "How many hired servants of my father's have bread enough to spare, and I'm dying with hunger! I will get up and go to my father, and will tell him, 'Father, I have sinned against heaven, and in your sight. I am no more worthy to be called your son. Make me as one of your hired servants.'" He arose, and came to his father. But while he was still far off, his father saw him, and was moved with compassion, and ran towards him, and fell on his neck, and kissed him.
Wikipedia mentions that:
This implies the father was hopefully watching for the son's return.
And then goes on to say:
The son does not even have time to finish his rehearsed speech, since the father calls for his servants to dress him in a fine robe, a ring, and sandals, and slaughter the "fattened calf" for a celebratory meal.
And:
On the son's return, the father treats him with a generosity far more than he has a right to expect.
.

Also, I never thought of him as a farmer, or at least not a poor one, because:
The parable begins with a young man, the younger of two sons, who asks his father to give him his share of the estate.
Plus fatted calf and rings and robes are not things typically owned by a farmer, unless he's a wealthy one with many lands.

So the sermon I heard was about how the parable is highlighting God's love for his children, and how even when we stray, God (portrayed by the father in the parable) eagerly awaits our return, and when we return, instead of treating us as our sins deserve, shows love and give us good things. Which is why that pastor used the term prodigal with the father in the story.
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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby vijayjohn » 2017-02-10, 6:55

I knew all of this except:
dEhiN wrote:Also, I never thought of him as a farmer, or at least not a poor one, because:
The parable begins with a young man, the younger of two sons, who asks his father to give him his share of the estate.
Plus fatted calf and rings and robes are not things typically owned by a farmer, unless he's a wealthy one with many lands.

An estate doesn't have to mean a large amount of property even though it typically does these days, and I'm not sure it's true that a farmer who wasn't all that wealthy couldn't have a fatted calf, rings, and robes. If you raise calves for meat, of course you're going to fatten them up, inasmuch as you can anyway, otherwise you wouldn't have much to eat when you killed it. :P And depending on how prosperous the specific area (presumably somewhere in Palestine) where the characters of this story lived was at the time, it's entirely possible that even relatively ordinary citizens had some minor luxuries at least.
So the sermon I heard was about how the parable is highlighting God's love for his children, and how even when we stray, God (portrayed by the father in the parable) eagerly awaits our return, and when we return, instead of treating us as our sins deserve, shows love and give us good things. Which is why that pastor used the term prodigal with the father in the story.

But giving someone love and good things despite their sins doesn't make you wastefully extravagant, just forgiving. That's what makes no sense to me.

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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby dEhiN » 2017-02-10, 13:25

vijayjohn wrote:An estate doesn't have to mean a large amount of property even though it typically does these days, and I'm not sure it's true that a farmer who wasn't all that wealthy couldn't have a fatted calf, rings, and robes. If you raise calves for meat, of course you're going to fatten them up, inasmuch as you can anyway, otherwise you wouldn't have much to eat when you killed it. :P And depending on how prosperous the specific area (presumably somewhere in Palestine) where the characters of this story lived was at the time, it's entirely possible that even relatively ordinary citizens had some minor luxuries at least.

That's true.

But giving someone love and good things despite their sins doesn't make you wastefully extravagant, just forgiving. That's what makes no sense to me.

Good point. Yeah I guess picking it apart does reveal that prodigal should be used with the son not with the father.
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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby vijayjohn » 2017-02-11, 4:58

Thanks! :)

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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby dEhiN » 2017-02-11, 18:57

vijayjohn wrote:Thanks! :)

நீ வணக்கம் இருக்கிறாய்! (Haha, that was my attempt to literally say "you are welcome" in Tamil! :D )
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