Multilingual True Friends

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Michael
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Re: Multilingual True Friends

Postby Michael » 2016-07-23, 20:44

 (sq) prind
 (en) parent
N: American English (en-us) Pizzonese (nap) | B1: Italian (it) Mexican Spanish (es-mx) Brazilian Portuguese (pt-br) Greek (el) | A2:  (sq) Persian (fa) Azerbaijani (az) | A1: Turkish (tr)
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Re: Multilingual True Friends

Postby linguoboy » 2016-07-23, 20:55

Michael wrote: (sq) prind
 (en) parent

I guess there's an etymological connexion? Because I see prind and think "friend", not "parent".
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Re: Multilingual True Friends

Postby Michael » 2016-07-23, 20:56

linguoboy wrote:
Michael wrote: (sq) prind
 (en) parent

I guess there's an etymological connexion? Because I see prind and think "friend", not "parent".

According to Wiktionary: "From Latin parēns, parentem."

However, if I had known it came from Latin, I wouldn't have posted it.
N: American English (en-us) Pizzonese (nap) | B1: Italian (it) Mexican Spanish (es-mx) Brazilian Portuguese (pt-br) Greek (el) | A2:  (sq) Persian (fa) Azerbaijani (az) | A1: Turkish (tr)
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Re: Multilingual True Friends

Postby vijayjohn » 2016-11-19, 5:03

The first two of these are definitely not cognates. The third pair probably isn't, either. The fourth one almost certainly is:

English (en) dog
Mbabaram (ntj) dog

English (en) bad
Persian (fa) بد bad

English (en) to cut
Urdu (ur) کاٹنا / Hindi (hi) काटना [ˈkaʈna]

Malay (ms) kolam - pond (though also (e.g. swimming) pool)
Malayalam (ml) കുളം [kɔˈɭəm] - pond

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Re: Multilingual True Friends

Postby linguoboy » 2017-03-13, 22:46

 (ady) тутын cigarette
 (ga) toitín cigarette
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Re: Multilingual True Friends

Postby vijayjohn » 2017-03-19, 7:02

I guess you could say this is a true friend:

Malayalam (ml) കാണ് [ˈkaːɳɯ] - see!
Mandarin Chinese (zh)kàn - look!

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Michael
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Re: Multilingual True Friends

Postby Michael » 2017-04-01, 21:35

 (sq) gisht, -i, -a(t) finger
 (fa) انگشت angošt
 (tg) ангушт

 (sq) para, -ja, -Ø money
 (tr) para

The Albanian analogue of the latter pair is an obvious Turkish loan. It exists in Kurdish as well.
N: American English (en-us) Pizzonese (nap) | B1: Italian (it) Mexican Spanish (es-mx) Brazilian Portuguese (pt-br) Greek (el) | A2:  (sq) Persian (fa) Azerbaijani (az) | A1: Turkish (tr)
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Re: Multilingual True Friends

Postby vijayjohn » 2017-04-02, 1:13

Michael wrote: (sq) gisht, -i, -a(t) finger
 (fa) انگشت angošt
 (tg) ангушт

(Vlax) Romani also has angušt (also meaning 'finger'; Sinti has gušto), and Sanskrit has अङ्गुष्ठ aṅguṣṭha 'thumb, big toe, hallux'. Some modern Indo-Aryan languages have similar words for 'finger', too. The words for 'finger' in Sanskrit and a lot of its descendants are also related, albeit a bit more distantly, and Dravidian languages have borrowed this Sanskrit word as well.
 (sq) para, -ja, -Ø money
 (tr) para

The Albanian analogue of the latter pair is an obvious Turkish loan. It exists in Kurdish as well.

The Turkish word comes from Persian, so maybe the Kurdish word is native?

Hungarian and even English have words derived from this word, too (due to its onetime use as a unit of currency, especially in the Ottoman Empire).

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Re: Multilingual True Friends

Postby Michael » 2017-04-05, 18:37

 (sq)
fëmij/ë, -a, -ë(t) child
familj/e, -a, -e(t) family (pure Albanian: farefis)

Both of these words are derived from the Latin familia, but the former was borrowed into Albanian during the first of the three separate bouts of Latin influence upon the medieval Albanian tribes, and has shifted semantically since then, while the latter was apparently borrowed more recently.
N: American English (en-us) Pizzonese (nap) | B1: Italian (it) Mexican Spanish (es-mx) Brazilian Portuguese (pt-br) Greek (el) | A2:  (sq) Persian (fa) Azerbaijani (az) | A1: Turkish (tr)
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Re: Multilingual True Friends

Postby dEhiN » 2017-04-06, 17:04

Michael wrote: (sq)
fëmij/ë, -a, -ë(t) child
familj/e, -a, -e(t) family (pure Albanian: farefis)

Both of these words are derived from the Latin familia, but the former was borrowed into Albanian during the first of the three separate bouts of Latin influence upon the medieval Albanian tribes, and has shifted semantically since then, while the latter was apparently borrowed more recently.

Is that why there's a pure Albanian word for family but none for child? What about Old Albanian (or Proto-Albanian if such a thing existed)? Surely child is such a core vocabulary word, they must've had a non Latin-influenced word?
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Re: Multilingual True Friends

Postby linguoboy » 2017-04-06, 17:59

dEhiN wrote:Surely child is such a core vocabulary word, they must've had a non Latin-influenced word?

I can easily see a language lacking a native gender-inclusive term. Irish, for instance, has a native term for "baby" (leanbh) but even the term for "offspring", clann, is a borrowing of Latin planta. Páiste (from Norman French page) is the usual word for "child" in the modern language. (In some dialects, gasúr from Norman French garçun has this meaning, but generally it's specifically "boy".) All other words designating adolescents--e.g. gearrbhodach, girseach, buachaill, macaomh--are gendered.
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Re: Multilingual True Friends

Postby dEhiN » 2017-04-08, 14:35

linguoboy wrote:
dEhiN wrote:Surely child is such a core vocabulary word, they must've had a non Latin-influenced word?

I can easily see a language lacking a native gender-inclusive term. Irish, for instance, has a native term for "baby" (leanbh) but even the term for "offspring", clann, is a borrowing of Latin planta. Páiste (from Norman French page) is the usual word for "child" in the modern language. (In some dialects, gasúr from Norman French garçun has this meaning, but generally it's specifically "boy".) All other words designating adolescents--e.g. gearrbhodach, girseach, buachaill, macaomh--are gendered.

I never thought of that, but that makes sense. Do you know when páiste and gasúr came into Irish? Was it during the Norman conquest and rule of England?
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Re: Multilingual True Friends

Postby linguoboy » 2017-04-09, 13:42

dEhiN wrote:I never thought of that, but that makes sense. Do you know when páiste and gasúr came into Irish? Was it during the Norman conquest and rule of England?

No, it was during the Norman conquest of Ireland.
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Re: Multilingual True Friends

Postby Michael » 2017-04-19, 9:44

 (sq) pik/ë, -a, -a(t) point
 (en) peak (even: pike)

This one's prolly a bit of a stretch, but I digress:

 (sq) lashë irregular 1PS.PRET of "to leave, let"
 (it) lascia 3PS.PRES.IND and 2PS.IMP of lasciare "to leave, let"
 (nap) lassa 3PS.PRES.IND and 2PS.IMP of lassà "to leave, let"
N: American English (en-us) Pizzonese (nap) | B1: Italian (it) Mexican Spanish (es-mx) Brazilian Portuguese (pt-br) Greek (el) | A2:  (sq) Persian (fa) Azerbaijani (az) | A1: Turkish (tr)
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Re: Multilingual True Friends

Postby vijayjohn » 2017-04-20, 0:04

Michael wrote: (sq) lashë irregular 1PS.PRET of "to leave, let"
 (it) lascia 3PS.PRES.IND and 2PS.IMP of lasciare "to leave, let"
 (nap) lassa 3PS.PRES.IND and 2PS.IMP of lassà "to leave, let"

German (de) lassen - to let, leave (imperative: lass(e))

Latin (la) - give! (+ descendants)
Tamil (ta) தா [t̪aː] - give! [+1st person indirect object] (+ cognates)


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