Random language thread 4

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Prowler
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Re: Random language thread 4

Postby Prowler » 2017-04-13, 18:01

OK I dunno where else to post this but...

Is it odd for me to have some sort of irrational hatred for the slang word "bro"? Something about it really irritates me for some reason. I don't like being called "bro". It sounds cringe worthy for some reason while "dude" and "man" don't.

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Re: Random language thread 4

Postby linguoboy » 2017-04-13, 18:06

Prowler wrote:Is it odd for me to have some sort of irrational hatred for the slang word "bro"? Something about it really irritates me for some reason. I don't like being called "bro". It sounds cringe worthy for some reason while "dude" and "man" don't.

Maybe because the stereotype of bro culture is so relentlessly negative. Nobody I know would ever think to use "bro" unironically.
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Re: Random language thread 4

Postby Prowler » 2017-04-13, 18:14

linguoboy wrote:
Prowler wrote:Is it odd for me to have some sort of irrational hatred for the slang word "bro"? Something about it really irritates me for some reason. I don't like being called "bro". It sounds cringe worthy for some reason while "dude" and "man" don't.

Maybe because the stereotype of bro culture is so relentlessly negative. Nobody I know would ever think to use "bro" unironically.

Yeah I had a feeling it was that. But I avoid to refer to people as "bros" or "dudebros" because labelling people can always be inaccurate or simplistic.

Sometimes people joke about me "one day becoming a brah" due to going to the gym. And man "brah" is even more cringe worthy.

Anyway, you said you were a teenager in the 80s iirc. So if you mostly talk to people aroudn your age I'm not surprised they don't use the word "bro".

Sadly, people online refer to me as "bro" and "bruh" at times. It's becoming the same thing as "man" and "dude".

Speaking of labels, the "nerd" one is a bit confusing. I thought it was supposedly used to describe people who loved math and hard sciences, but people use it to refer to pretty much anyone who likes video games, anime, LOTR, Star Trek and such more than your average Joe. I've been called a "nerd" and a "geek" before even though I'm terrible at math and physics. And now people are saying being a "nerd" is "cool". This whole thing seems dumb to me.

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Re: Random language thread 4

Postby voron » 2017-04-13, 18:30

There is a hilarious line in English in this dance song by a Kurdish DJ:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0MbgMib9V_A&t=2m10s

She is talking Zazaki, I don't know what she is saying,
She is trying Sorani, I am an Englishman, the Kurdistan world I don't understand.
:D
(Yeah but he knew enough to tell the difference between Zazaki and Sorani).

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Re: Random language thread 4

Postby Babbsagg » 2017-04-14, 0:57

dEhiN wrote:In the series there are many words which sound to me like oddly pronounced English, but I wasn't always sure whether it was the actual Danish way of saying that word (i.e., it was a word in Danish), or if the actor/actress was saying it in English but with their Danish accents.

There was a plot arc during the second season which involved one of the Danish actors speaking English for various scenes over multiple episodes. There were also other moments in episodes where one of the Danish actors or actresses had to speak in English. I found their accents less estranged from a GA or even RP accent than I have heard from Swedes speaking English. Though to be fair, I've heard more Swedes in different environments speaking English, and these few moments in Dicte were the only times I heard a Dane speaking English.

I guess that makes sense considering that the Anglo-Saxons roughly came from what's today the German North Sea Coast and southernmost Denmark--and on top of that there was the Danish invasion and the Danelaw later.
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Re: Random language thread 4

Postby vijayjohn » 2017-04-14, 21:56

Babbsagg wrote:I don't know about the Swedes, but Norwegians often say the Danish sound as if they had hot potatoes in their mouths.

One guy I went to grad school with was from Mallorca and said that when we Americans talk, we sound like we have gum in our mouths, and when English people talk, they sound like they have a muffin in their mouths.
dEhiN wrote:On a different, but thread-related note, when writing the "though to be fair..." sentence, I naturally wanted to write "trying to speak English" instead of "speaking English". I caught myself, realizing what that implies. But do other English native speakers think/feel that way too? What about native speakers of other languages? Have you ever noticed non language enthusiasts convey that idea? That if a non-native speaker is speaking your native language, you see them as "trying to speak" instead of as "speaking"?

I don't think I've ever heard that or remember feeling that, no.
linguoboy wrote:Nobody I know would ever think to use "bro" unironically.

I've thought of using it lots of times (and used it a few times :P) without intending it as a joke. I guess you could say it's "ironic," but only in the sense that there's only one context where I would use it.
Prowler wrote:Sometimes people joke about me "one day becoming a brah" due to going to the gym. And man "brah" is even more cringe worthy.

I can think of exactly two people who I specifically remember using "brah." One is Mike and the other is ''' (maggy on Skype. Both are UniLangers).
Sadly, people online refer to me as "bro" and "bruh" at times. It's becoming the same thing as "man" and "dude".

There are (or were) a few people at work who have called me both before.
Speaking of labels, the "nerd" one is a bit confusing. I thought it was supposedly used to describe people who loved math and hard sciences, but people use it to refer to pretty much anyone who likes video games, anime, LOTR, Star Trek and such more than your average Joe. I've been called a "nerd" and a "geek" before even though I'm terrible at math and physics. And now people are saying being a "nerd" is "cool". This whole thing seems dumb to me.

I always thought nerds were basically any kind of intellectual and geeks were just unpopular kids.
voron wrote:There is a hilarious line in English in this dance song by a Kurdish DJ:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0MbgMib9V_A&t=2m10s

She is talking Zazaki, I don't know what she is saying,
She is trying Sorani, I am an Englishman, the Kurdistan world I don't understand.
:D
(Yeah but he knew enough to tell the difference between Zazaki and Sorani).

First this reminded me of Meera pointing out that Bollywood movie songs have the corniest English lyrics, such as I see what I want, I see what I love, she's sent to me from heaven above! She's so cool, she's so fine, out of ten I'd give her nine! :lol: Then it reminded me of this song that's in English but with lots of Neo-Aramaic words in it:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wq13SKoQN9c
"I want you teach me Assyrian," honey I think you know enough Assyrian already! :P

Also dang, Bangladeshis can be so much harder for me to understand than West Bengalis (when either is speaking Bengali)!

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Re: Random language thread 4

Postby mōdgethanc » 2017-04-15, 5:29

Prowler wrote:OK I dunno where else to post this but...

Is it odd for me to have some sort of irrational hatred for the slang word "bro"? Something about it really irritates me for some reason. I don't like being called "bro". It sounds cringe worthy for some reason while "dude" and "man" don't.
No, because bro is shorthand for "douchebag" and probably also for "rapist". The word "dude" sounds dated to the 80s or 90s, and "man" to the 60s or 70s, but both are pretty neutral. Someone who calls me "dude" is someone who probably watched a lot of MTV growing up and smokes weed; someone who calls me "bro" is most likely someone I want to get the hell away from me.

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Re: Random language thread 4

Postby dEhiN » 2017-04-15, 7:53

mōdgethanc wrote:
Prowler wrote:OK I dunno where else to post this but...

Is it odd for me to have some sort of irrational hatred for the slang word "bro"? Something about it really irritates me for some reason. I don't like being called "bro". It sounds cringe worthy for some reason while "dude" and "man" don't.
No, because bro is shorthand for "douchebag" and probably also for "rapist". The word "dude" sounds dated to the 80s or 90s, and "man" to the 60s or 70s, but both are pretty neutral. Someone who calls me "dude" is someone who probably watched a lot of MTV growing up and smokes weed; someone who calls me "bro" is most likely someone I want to get the hell away from me.

I didn't respond to Prowler's post or linguoboy's reply but I want to reply now. I think the usage of bro/brah/dude/man all depends on context, the circle of friends, and the individual using it (including his tone, etc.). i've used all 4 words unironically and I'm not a douchebag nor rapist nor did I mean the person I was calling those words were any of those things. There have been a few times where I've used bro/brah/dude with an ironic/satirical/condescending tone intentionally and in those cases, I was implying the person on the receiving end was a douchebag.

So I don't think it's right to generalize those who use these words. Internet usage is different, and since it's written text with a stranger, I have no way of knowing what the person means when they use those words. I personally think that because dude and man are older words, they have a more neutral or generic meaning than bro and brah.
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Re: Random language thread 4

Postby Prowler » 2017-04-15, 18:06

mōdgethanc wrote:
Prowler wrote:OK I dunno where else to post this but...

Is it odd for me to have some sort of irrational hatred for the slang word "bro"? Something about it really irritates me for some reason. I don't like being called "bro". It sounds cringe worthy for some reason while "dude" and "man" don't.
No, because bro is shorthand for "douchebag" and probably also for "rapist". The word "dude" sounds dated to the 80s or 90s, and "man" to the 60s or 70s, but both are pretty neutral. Someone who calls me "dude" is someone who probably watched a lot of MTV growing up and smokes weed; someone who calls me "bro" is most likely someone I want to get the hell away from me.

Actually, I think I used "man" and "dude" due to growing up watching the 1987 Ninja Turtles cartoon and finding Michelangelo's expressions funny. No, I don't use "tubular" or "radical", but I think "dude" was the first English slang word I've learned. I was like 5 years old and the 1987 TMNT toon began rerunning here. So yeah... tbh "dude" doesn't really fit me. I type it online but if I had to chat to someone face to face in English I'd not use it. I don't smoke weed nor am I a surfer.

Yeah "bro" sure sounds douchey, but rapist? Care to elaborate? :hmm:

Btw, I seem to almost take offence when someone refers to me as a sportsman or an athlete just because I mention I go to the gym... yes I know exercising implies that somehow but I don't like being labelled as such for some odd reason.

dEhiN wrote:
mōdgethanc wrote:
Prowler wrote:OK I dunno where else to post this but...

Is it odd for me to have some sort of irrational hatred for the slang word "bro"? Something about it really irritates me for some reason. I don't like being called "bro". It sounds cringe worthy for some reason while "dude" and "man" don't.
No, because bro is shorthand for "douchebag" and probably also for "rapist". The word "dude" sounds dated to the 80s or 90s, and "man" to the 60s or 70s, but both are pretty neutral. Someone who calls me "dude" is someone who probably watched a lot of MTV growing up and smokes weed; someone who calls me "bro" is most likely someone I want to get the hell away from me.

I didn't respond to Prowler's post or linguoboy's reply but I want to reply now. I think the usage of bro/brah/dude/man all depends on context, the circle of friends, and the individual using it (including his tone, etc.). i've used all 4 words unironically and I'm not a douchebag nor rapist nor did I mean the person I was calling those words were any of those things. There have been a few times where I've used bro/brah/dude with an ironic/satirical/condescending tone intentionally and in those cases, I was implying the person on the receiving end was a douchebag.

So I don't think it's right to generalize those who use these words. Internet usage is different, and since it's written text with a stranger, I have no way of knowing what the person means when they use those words. I personally think that because dude and man are older words, they have a more neutral or generic meaning than bro and brah.

"Man" is just a word that fits in at the end of certain sentences. As in if someone asks me something I'll answer "no, man". Or if I'm chatting with someone and am about to complain about something I start of with "man..."

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Re: Random language thread 4

Postby vijayjohn » 2017-04-15, 18:23

Prowler wrote:No, I don't use "tubular" or "radical"

Me neither. I didn't even know "tubular" was a thing.
Yeah "bro" sure sounds douchey, but rapist? Care to elaborate? :hmm:

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfr ... -ban-frats
Btw, I seem to almost take offence when someone refers to me as a sportsman or an athlete just because I mention I go to the gym... yes I know exercising implies that somehow but I don't like being labelled as such for some odd reason.

I don't like it when people act like it's a big deal for me to exercise in general. To me, if I'm exercising, I'm exercising, and if I'm not, I'm not. Either way, I have my reasons for either doing it or not doing it, and it's really nobody else's business unless maybe I have some really critical health issue or something.

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Re: Random language thread 4

Postby Prowler » 2017-04-15, 18:32

vijayjohn wrote:https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfr ... -ban-frats
That's messed up.

vijayjohn wrote: I don't like it when people act like it's a big deal for me to exercise in general. To me, if I'm exercising, I'm exercising, and if I'm not, I'm not. Either way, I have my reasons for either doing it or not doing it, and it's really nobody else's business unless maybe I have some really critical health issue or something.

Worst is when they still remind you for being "too thin" or "too fat". Yeah I know that, thanks. It's almost like gains take their time or something. I get enough pressure already. No wonder so many people are unmotivated to workout and just say "ah fuck it. What's the point?" :ohwell:

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Re: Random language thread 4

Postby mōdgethanc » 2017-04-16, 6:00

Prowler wrote:Yeah "bro" sure sounds douchey, but rapist? Care to elaborate?
Bros are known for having a culture of toxic masculinity that encourages heavy drinking and bragging about sexual conquests. It's that lax player frat-dweller mentality of getting "lit" and fucking bitches. It's not hard to see how these attitudes of demeaning women and consuming large quantities of alcohol could easily lead to questionable sexual consent at best.

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Re: Random language thread 4

Postby Johanna » 2017-04-17, 13:31

dEhiN wrote:There's also one phrase that I feel like I've heard several times and I seem to remember as sounding like /ɛlæɾə dʉ̩̟/ and I think the translation was something like "what do you mean" or "what do you think". But I might be way off because neither "what do you mean" or "what do you think" seem to be close to that.

I wonder if it's something like the Swedish eller hur? :hmm:

Literally it means "or how?", but Its exact translation differs a bit, it's mostly used when you'd add a tag question to an English sentence, like in for example "It's not like that, is it?" or "You picked it up, didn't you?". So when you ask someone what they think about something, this short phrase becomes about that too.
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Re: Random language thread 4

Postby linguoboy » 2017-04-17, 14:28

While at the bookstore Saturday, I picked up a graphic novel in Spanish for my nephew. I also assumed that it had been written in Spanish, but I found out I was wrong last night when I couldn't sleep so I read the first chapter. The translation is generally smooth and colloquial, but I came across a couple of bits which didn't make sense. First, the focus character's mother tells a story about having rejected her Mexican heritage to the point of not learning to speak good Spanish. Of course, since the beginning of the story, she's been speaking nothing but perfectly idiomatic Mexican Spanish. Later, her daughter meets some ghosts. After she says, "Hola" and they don't respond, the boy with her tells her that they are the souls of non-English-speakers, so she says, "¡HOLA!" and suddenly they all become friendly.

I'm not sure how a translator could have fixed these problems. Giving the mother slightly non-native diction, as if she'd only learned Spanish later in life, would've been a job of work and might have invited criticism (either from Chicanos sensitive about the issue or educators who didn't want to see errors modeled for students). In the second case, I think it would've been simple enough to have the child initially say "Hi" on the unspoken assumption that strangers are more likely to know English.
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Re: Random language thread 4

Postby mōdgethanc » 2017-04-17, 19:05

Prowler wrote:Speaking of labels, the "nerd" one is a bit confusing. I thought it was supposedly used to describe people who loved math and hard sciences, but people use it to refer to pretty much anyone who likes video games, anime, LOTR, Star Trek and such more than your average Joe. I've been called a "nerd" and a "geek" before even though I'm terrible at math and physics. And now people are saying being a "nerd" is "cool". This whole thing seems dumb to me.
A nerd is someone who is academically inclined, especially in science and math, but it could be anything. A geek is someone who has a strong passion for some particular non-academic interest, which could be board games, comics, superhero movies, etc.

Having said that, there's this:

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Re: Random language thread 4

Postby vijayjohn » 2017-04-18, 4:52

linguoboy wrote:While at the bookstore Saturday, I picked up a graphic novel in Spanish for my nephew. I also assumed that it had been written in Spanish, but I found out I was wrong last night when I couldn't sleep so I read the first chapter. The translation is generally smooth and colloquial, but I came across a couple of bits which didn't make sense. First, the focus character's mother tells a story about having rejected her Mexican heritage to the point of not learning to speak good Spanish. Of course, since the beginning of the story, she's been speaking nothing but perfectly idiomatic Mexican Spanish. Later, her daughter meets some ghosts. After she says, "Hola" and they don't respond, the boy with her tells her that they are the souls of non-English-speakers, so she says, "¡HOLA!" and suddenly they all become friendly.

I'm not sure how a translator could have fixed these problems. Giving the mother slightly non-native diction, as if she'd only learned Spanish later in life, would've been a job of work and might have invited criticism (either from Chicanos sensitive about the issue or educators who didn't want to see errors modeled for students). In the second case, I think it would've been simple enough to have the child initially say "Hi" on the unspoken assumption that strangers are more likely to know English.

This reminded me of some of the amusing issues I've encountered in children's literature in Malayalam (especially when it's obviously a direct translation from English).

EDIT: I just found out that one song I posted in the "music in minority languages" thread, hoping it was in a variety of Tamazight (Berber), was just a popular Libyan Arabic folk song after all. :oops: It's called ياريت تعاود يا ماضي.

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Re: Random language thread 4

Postby linguoboy » 2017-04-21, 17:36

I got the "French" and "Finnish" rows mixed up on a chart of translations and momentarily thought the French word for "pointer" was osoitin.
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Re: Random language thread 4

Postby Dormouse559 » 2017-04-21, 18:36

It would be a perfectly valid spelling in French. :hmm: I say we keep it.
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Re: Random language thread 4

Postby vijayjohn » 2017-04-22, 3:30

This is a dialog from a Malayalam movie that I posted earlier in this thread. I've always wanted to (try to) transcribe and translate it, and now, here it is! It's not at all the kind of movie I like watching, but I have seen it, and I suppose you could say this scene is kind of interesting since In addition to Malayalam, it includes English, Hindi, and what is supposed to be Tamil (it even seems to include a word in Marathi that's supposed to be masquerading as Tamil).

The movie itself is about a Malayalee businessman named Bhuvana Chandran who finds himself caught in the middle of a gang turf war in Tamil Nadu. One of the gangsters is a Tamil guy named Pandi Durai, and he is conscripted into his gang. The other is actually Malayalee, and his name is Karuppayya Swami. In this scene, Pandi's gang confronts Karuppayya's, but the encounter quickly turns into a battle of (linguistic) wits thanks to Karuppayya's daughter, Meena.

I'm including the following as indicators for what language is being spoken at any given time (I'll assume English is obvious enough, but I'll transcribe that, too, since it's not always intuitively clear what they're saying in it. Even to me, it wasn't. :P I've transcribed the parts that aren't in any particular language in Roman script, too):

Malayalam (ml) Malayalam (even though it's apparently supposed to be Tamil lol)
Hindi (hi) (Not completely grammatical) Hindi (same flag as Malayalam, of course, but at least you can tell the difference between written Hindi and written Malayalam, and there's only like two lines in it anyway)
Tamil (ta) Actual Tamil
"Tamil (ta)" Fake Tamil, which I've written in Malayalam script; clearly not Malayalam, but very close to it for the most part and almost certainly not real Tamil, either, even though it's intended to sound to the audience like Tamil
Marathi (mr) A word that also is supposed to be in Tamil but appears to actually be Marathi, though it probably comes ultimately from Telugu and is also found in Dakhini (the variety of Urdu spoken in Hyderabad) and probably also Bambaiyya Hindi (the variety spoken in Mumbai)
"_____" just means I couldn't make out what word they were saying
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ll79oKRr-Sg
Pandi: Malayalam (ml) നീ ________ കണ്ടോ? എന്റെ അമ്മ പറഞ്ഞനുസരിച്ച ആ സ്ഥലത്തിന്റെ പ്രശ്‍നം പറഞ്ഞു തീർക്കേണ്ടിയ ആളെ വിട്ടു. ആ ആളിനെ അവന്മാർ ചുരുട്ടിയില്ലേ? ആ അതിനെ ഇനി സംസാരിക്കേണ്ട. എടി, നീ അയാളുടെ "Tamil (ta)" മോളില്ലെ?  (ta) நீ இறங்கடி! இறங்கடி Marathi (mr) इकडे! Malayalam (ml) നീ സംസാരിച്ചാ മതി. "Tamil (ta)" ഈ പ്രശ്‍നം പറഞ്ചു തീർക്കാതെ നിയോ നിന്റെ അച്ഛനോ ഇവിടൂന്നു പോകില്ലാം. Tamil (ta) பேசடி, பேசடி! பேசு!!
'You see __________? I sent off a guy to take care of the problem with that land that I took because my mom told me to. :?: Didn't those guys roll him up? :?: There's no point in talking about that now. Hey you, aren't you his daughter? You get out! Get out here! I'll let you do the talking. Neither you nor your dad will leave from here without clearing up this problem. Talk, girl...talk, girl! Talk!!!'

Meena: O...O-OK!

P: Ahhh!

M: Let us talk about your bloody thirty acres land!

P: Ah?

M: Talk about your bloody thirty acres land!

(Pandi gulps).

M: Come on...come on, man!

Karuppayya: Ey, Pandi! Heh! Tamil (ta) என்னடா? பேசடா, பேசு! உனக்கு "Tamil (ta)" തെരിയുമോടാ? Tamil (ta) இது ABCD டா! "Tamil (ta)" ദേയ്, നീ ഊരുക്ക് പെരിയുന്തവനേ! നീ ഭയങ്കരവന്താനേ! പേശടാ! മോളേ! Tamil (ta) இங்கே வா! "Tamil (ta)" പേശു മുടി! Heh heh! ദേയ് പാണ്ടി, എന്റെ മോള് ഡിഗ്രീയാണടാ, ഡിഗ്രീ! വീട്ടിലും ഞങ്ങൾ ഇംഗ്ലീഷിലേ പേസാറുള്ളൂ.
'What's up, man? Talk, man, talk! You know, man? This is an ABCD!* Look, you're a big ol' city guy! You're so great! Talk, man! Honey! Come here! Get talking! :?: Look, Pandi, my daughter's (got) a degree, a degree! Even at home, we only speak English.'

P: Ah?

K: Malayalam (ml) ങ്‌ഹും!
'Yeah!'

P: Malayalam (ml) ങ്‌ഹും??
'Huh??'

K: Malayalam (ml) എടാ, "Tamil (ta)" സ്‌കൂളിന്റെ Malayalam (ml) പഠിച്ച കുട്ടി എങ്ങാനേലും ഉണ്ടോടാ നിന്റെകൂടെ? "Tamil (ta)" ചൊല്ലടാ**, Tamil (ta) சொல்!
'Dude, do you have a kid who went to school anywhere with you at all? Tell us, dude, tell us!'

(Everyone in Pandi's gang avoids looking at him in the face. Karuppayya chuckles, satisfied).

Bhuvana: Excuse me. What's happened here, ah? What's the matter? Ah?

P: Malayalam (ml) നിനക്ക് ഇംഗ്ലീഷ് അറിയാമോ? Tamil (ta) அப்ப "Tamil (ta)" പള്ള് സൊല്ലടാ! Tamil (ta) சொல்லு!
'You know English? Then cuss him out! Do it!'

B: Hey old man!

P: Ah!

B: What's going on here, ah?

P: Ah!

K: Ehhhh?

B: What's wrong with you?

P: Mmm!

B: Hey, come on, man!

P: [unintelligible]

B: Hey! Let's talk about the thirty acres of land, the bloody thirty acres of land! Hey! (implying he's fat) Humpty Dumpty sat on a wall? (implying he's childish) Twinkle, twinkle, little star? (implying he's stupid) How I wonder what you are!

K: Ey! Malayalam (ml) വണ്ടി എടുക്കട്ടെ, മോളേ?
'Should I get the car, honey?'

P: Tamil (ta) பேசடா!
'Talk, man!'

B: Hey, madam, you know one thing? Once upon a time, there was a lion living in the dense forest. His name is Pandi Durai!

(Pandi's gang cheers).

P: Tamil (ta) பேசடா!!
'Talk, man!!'

B: Hindi (hi) हम्हें सुन...Tamil (ta) பாண்டி துரை அண்ண Hindi (hi) और मैं जो कहता है, वही यह ग़म पे चलेगा। :?:
'Listen to me...what Big Brother Pandi Durai and I say will walk on these tears.' :?:

P: Eh?

B: Malayalam (ml) ഹിന്ദി, അണ്ണേ!
'Hindi, Big Brother!'

P: Oh! Hee hee hee! Hindi!!!

B: Hindi (hi) वह तीस acre ज़मीन हैं ना, वह Tamil (ta) அண்ணா Hindi (hi) की है।
'You know those thirty acres of land? It's Big Brother's.'

K: Uh

B: Hindi (hi) सिर्फ Tamil (ta) அண்ணா Hindi (hi) की है! समझा? समझा, बेटी?
'It's only Big Brother's! Understood? Understood, honey?'

K: Eh!

B: Hindi (hi) क्या?
'What?'

K: "Tamil (ta)" ഈ ഹിന്ദിക്കും അറിവിന്ത്യ അറിവില്ലെങ്കിൽ :?: Malayalam (ml) എന്റെ പേര് കറുപ്പയ്യനല്ല! നീ ചെവിയേ നുള്ളിക്കോ! വാ മോളേ!
'If knowledgeable India doesn't have knowledge of this Hindi, :?: then my name isn't Karuppayya, (and you can) go ahead and pinch my ear! Come on, honey!'

P: Tamil (ta) போடா!
'Git outta here!'

K: Malayalam (ml) കയ്യടിക്കടാ!
'Clap, dammit!'

B: Malayalam (ml) [inaudible] പറഞ്ഞപ്പോ, അയ്യോ! അയ്യോ, ചവിട്ടരുത്, കേട്ടോ? വിട് കേട്ടോ? അയ്യോ! അണ്ണാ! ഒന്ന് നിന്നത്...അയ്യോ!
[not sure I heard this line right at all, but I'm trying] 'When [inaudible] said [inaudible], ow! Ow, don't step on me, okay? Let go, okay? Ow! Big Brother! Just wait and...ow!'

P: Malayalam (ml) യ്യോ, എന്റള്ളോ, എന്റള്ളോ, എന്റള്ളോ!
'Oh my Allah, my Allah, my Allah!' [that's an unexpected quote given that the actor appears to be Hindu and his character definitely is :shock:]

*I'm not sure whether he means "American-Born Confused Desi" or just that she's literate in English or something. I think the latter is more likely.

**Technically, this is a valid Tamil word but only if it's taken to be in a different register of Tamil from the one he uses right after that when repeating more or less the exact same word.

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Re: Random language thread 4

Postby dEhiN » 2017-04-22, 13:55

vijayjohn wrote:This is a dialog from a Malayalam movie that I posted earlier in this thread. I've always wanted to (try to) transcribe and translate it, and now, here it is!

ரொம நன்றி!

vijayjohn wrote:K: Malayalam (ml) എടാ, "Tamil (ta)" സ്‌കൂളിന്റെ Malayalam (ml) പഠിച്ച കുട്ടി എങ്ങാനേലും ഉണ്ടോടാ നിന്റെകൂടെ? "Tamil (ta)" ചൊല്ലടാ**, Tamil (ta) சொல்!
...
**Technically, this is a valid Tamil word but only if it's taken to be in a different register of Tamil from the one he uses right after that when repeating more or less the exact same word.

What's the word he says before சொல்?
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